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$52.00
1. The Decameron / Giovanni Boccaccio
 
2. Decameron / Giovanni Boccaccio
 
3. The Decameron or Ten days' Entertainment
4. Stories of Boccaccio (The Decameron),
5. The Decameron, Volume II
 
6. Concerning famous women / translated
 
$31.08
7. Opere volgari di Giovanni Boccaccio,
 
$32.38
8. Opere volgari di Giovanni Boccaccio,
 
$31.08
9. Decameron Von Heinrich Steinhowel
 
$31.08
10. Le Philocope De Messire Iean Boccace
 
11. The Decameron or Ten Days Entertainment
 
12. Tales from Boccaccio.
 
13. Boccaccio 's Olympia. ed. with
 
14. Pearl : an English poem of the
 
15. GESAMMELTE WERKE (in 5 volumes)
$34.90
16. Visualizing Boccaccio: Studies
$5.94
17. Decameron and the Philosophy of
 
18. Boccaccio: The Man and His Works
$51.25
19. A Rhetoric of the Decameron (Toronto
$18.87
20. Boccaccio: Decameron (Landmarks

1. The Decameron / Giovanni Boccaccio ; translated by G. H. McWilliam
by Giovanni (1313-1375) Boccaccio
 Hardcover: Pages (1979-01-01)
-- used & new: US$52.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B001KIBB4A
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2. Decameron / Giovanni Boccaccio ; the John Payne translation, revised and annotated by Charles S. Singleton [complete in two volumes with a 3rd supplementary volume of notes and commentary]
by Giovanni (1313-1375) Boccaccio
 Hardcover: Pages (1982-01-01)

Asin: B000W00KUI
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Customer Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Bawdy tales of love
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
The "Decameron" is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353.It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.Other topics such as wit and witticism, practical jokes and worldly initiation also form part of the mosaic.Beyond its entertainment and literary popularity, it remains an important historical document of life in the fourteenth century.

Decameron is structured in a frame narrative, or frame tale.Boccaccio begins with a description of the Black Death and leads into an introduction of a group of seven young women and three young men who flee from plague-ridden Florence to a villa in the (then) countryside of Fiesole for two weeks.To pass the time, each member of the party tells one story for each one of the nights spent at the villa.Although fourteen days pass, two days each week are set aside: one day for chores and one holy day during which no work is done.In this manner, 100 stories are told by the end of the ten days.Each of the ten characters is charged as King or Queen of the company for one of the ten days in turn.This charge extends to choosing the theme of the stories for that day, and all but two days have topics assigned: examples of the power of fortune; examples of the power of human will; love tales that end tragically; love tales that end happily; clever replies that save the speaker; tricks that women play on men; tricks that people play on each other in general; examples of virtue.Only Dioneo, who usually tells the tenth tale each day, has the right to tell a tale on any topic he wishes, due to his wit.Each day also includes a short introduction and conclusion to continue the frame of the tales by describing other daily activities besides story telling.These frame tale interludes frequently include transcriptions of Italian folk songs.The interactions among tales in a day, or across days, as Boccaccio spins variations and reversals of previous material, forms a whole and not just a collection of stories. The basic plots of the stories including mocking the lust and greed of the clergy; tensions in Italian society between the new wealthy commercial class and noble families; the perils and adventures of traveling merchants.The title is a portmanteau, or combination of two Greek words meaning "ten" and "day".Boccacio made similar Greek etymological plays of words in his other works. The subtitle is Prencipe Galeotto, which derives from the opening material in which Boccaccio dedicates the work to ladies of the day who did not have the diversions of men (hunting, fishing, riding, falconry) who were forced to conceal their amorous passions and stay idle and concealed in their rooms.Thus, the book is subtitled Prencipe Galeotto, that is Galehaut, the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a nod to Dante's allusion to Galeotto in "Inferno V", who was blamed for the arousal of lust in the episode of Paolo and Francesca.

Throughout Decameron, the mercantile ethic prevails and predominates.The commercial and urban values of quick wit, sophistication, and intelligence are treasured, while the vices of stupidity and dullness are cured, or punished.While these traits and values will seem obvious to the modern reader, they were an emerging feature in Europe with the rise of urban centers and a monetized economic system beyond the traditional rural feudal and monastery systems, which placed greater value on piety and loyalty.Beyond the unity provided by the frame narrative, Decameron provides a unity in philosophical outlook.Throughout runs the common medieval theme of Lady Fortune, and how quickly one can rise and fall through the external influences of the "Wheel of Fortune".Boccaccio had been educated in the tradition of Dante's Divine Comedy, which used various levels of allegory to show the connections between the literal events of the story and the hidden Christian message.However, Decameron uses Dante's model not to educate the reader, but to satirize this method of learning.The Roman Catholic Church, priests, and religious belief become the satirical source of comedy throughout.This was part of a wider historical trend in the aftermath of the Black Death, which saw widespread discontent with the church.Many details of the Decameron are infused with a medieval sense of numerological and mystical significance.For example, it is widely believed that the seven young women are meant to represent the Four Cardinal Virtues (Prudence, Justice, Temperance, and Fortitude) and the Three Theological Virtues (Faith, Hope, and Charity).It is further supposed that the three men represent the classical Greek tripartite division of the soul (Reason, Spirit, and Lust, see Book IV of Republic).Boccaccio himself notes that the names he gives for these ten characters are in fact pseudonyms chosen as "appropriate to the qualities of each".The Italian names of the seven women, in the same (most likely significant) order as given in the text, are: Pampinea, Fiammetta, Filomena, Emilia, Lauretta, Neifile, and Elissa.The men, in order, are: Panfilo, Filostrato, and Dioneo.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.
... Read more


3. The Decameron or Ten days' Entertainment of Boccaccio
by Giovanni (1313-1375) Boccaccio
 Hardcover: Pages (1926-01-01)

Asin: B001CEDWLW
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

4. Stories of Boccaccio (The Decameron), tr. from the Italian into English, with eleven original etchings by Leopold Flameng
by Giovanni (1313-1375) - Related names: Payne, John (1842-1916) tr; Fla Boccaccio
Hardcover: 555 Pages (1920)

Asin: B0000EEK6L
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Customer Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Bawdy tales of love
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
The "Decameron" is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353.It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.Other topics such as wit and witticism, practical jokes and worldly initiation also form part of the mosaic.Beyond its entertainment and literary popularity, it remains an important historical document of life in the fourteenth century.

Decameron is structured in a frame narrative, or frame tale.Boccaccio begins with a description of the Black Death and leads into an introduction of a group of seven young women and three young men who flee from plague-ridden Florence to a villa in the (then) countryside of Fiesole for two weeks.To pass the time, each member of the party tells one story for each one of the nights spent at the villa.Although fourteen days pass, two days each week are set aside: one day for chores and one holy day during which no work is done.In this manner, 100 stories are told by the end of the ten days.Each of the ten characters is charged as King or Queen of the company for one of the ten days in turn.This charge extends to choosing the theme of the stories for that day, and all but two days have topics assigned: examples of the power of fortune; examples of the power of human will; love tales that end tragically; love tales that end happily; clever replies that save the speaker; tricks that women play on men; tricks that people play on each other in general; examples of virtue.Only Dioneo, who usually tells the tenth tale each day, has the right to tell a tale on any topic he wishes, due to his wit.Each day also includes a short introduction and conclusion to continue the frame of the tales by describing other daily activities besides story telling.These frame tale interludes frequently include transcriptions of Italian folk songs.The interactions among tales in a day, or across days, as Boccaccio spins variations and reversals of previous material, forms a whole and not just a collection of stories. The basic plots of the stories including mocking the lust and greed of the clergy; tensions in Italian society between the new wealthy commercial class and noble families; the perils and adventures of traveling merchants.The title is a portmanteau, or combination of two Greek words meaning "ten" and "day".Boccacio made similar Greek etymological plays of words in his other works. The subtitle is Prencipe Galeotto, which derives from the opening material in which Boccaccio dedicates the work to ladies of the day who did not have the diversions of men (hunting, fishing, riding, falconry) who were forced to conceal their amorous passions and stay idle and concealed in their rooms.Thus, the book is subtitled Prencipe Galeotto, that is Galehaut, the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a nod to Dante's allusion to Galeotto in "Inferno V", who was blamed for the arousal of lust in the episode of Paolo and Francesca.

Throughout Decameron, the mercantile ethic prevails and predominates.The commercial and urban values of quick wit, sophistication, and intelligence are treasured, while the vices of stupidity and dullness are cured, or punished.While these traits and values will seem obvious to the modern reader, they were an emerging feature in Europe with the rise of urban centers and a monetized economic system beyond the traditional rural feudal and monastery systems, which placed greater value on piety and loyalty.Beyond the unity provided by the frame narrative, Decameron provides a unity in philosophical outlook.Throughout runs the common medieval theme of Lady Fortune, and how quickly one can rise and fall through the external influences of the "Wheel of Fortune".Boccaccio had been educated in the tradition of Dante's Divine Comedy, which used various levels of allegory to show the connections between the literal events of the story and the hidden Christian message.However, Decameron uses Dante's model not to educate the reader, but to satirize this method of learning.The Roman Catholic Church, priests, and religious belief become the satirical source of comedy throughout.This was part of a wider historical trend in the aftermath of the Black Death, which saw widespread discontent with the church.Many details of the Decameron are infused with a medieval sense of numerological and mystical significance.For example, it is widely believed that the seven young women are meant to represent the Four Cardinal Virtues (Prudence, Justice, Temperance, and Fortitude) and the Three Theological Virtues (Faith, Hope, and Charity).It is further supposed that the three men represent the classical Greek tripartite division of the soul (Reason, Spirit, and Lust, see Book IV of Republic).Boccaccio himself notes that the names he gives for these ten characters are in fact pseudonyms chosen as "appropriate to the qualities of each".The Italian names of the seven women, in the same (most likely significant) order as given in the text, are: Pampinea, Fiammetta, Filomena, Emilia, Lauretta, Neifile, and Elissa.The men, in order, are: Panfilo, Filostrato, and Dioneo.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.
... Read more


5. The Decameron, Volume II
by Giovanni, 1313-1375 Boccaccio
Kindle Edition: Pages (2009-10-04)
list price: US$1.99
Asin: B002RKTMFU
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars Bawdy tales of love
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
The "Decameron" is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353.It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.Other topics such as wit and witticism, practical jokes and worldly initiation also form part of the mosaic.Beyond its entertainment and literary popularity, it remains an important historical document of life in the fourteenth century.

Decameron is structured in a frame narrative, or frame tale.Boccaccio begins with a description of the Black Death and leads into an introduction of a group of seven young women and three young men who flee from plague-ridden Florence to a villa in the (then) countryside of Fiesole for two weeks.To pass the time, each member of the party tells one story for each one of the nights spent at the villa.Although fourteen days pass, two days each week are set aside: one day for chores and one holy day during which no work is done.In this manner, 100 stories are told by the end of the ten days.Each of the ten characters is charged as King or Queen of the company for one of the ten days in turn.This charge extends to choosing the theme of the stories for that day, and all but two days have topics assigned: examples of the power of fortune; examples of the power of human will; love tales that end tragically; love tales that end happily; clever replies that save the speaker; tricks that women play on men; tricks that people play on each other in general; examples of virtue.Only Dioneo, who usually tells the tenth tale each day, has the right to tell a tale on any topic he wishes, due to his wit.Each day also includes a short introduction and conclusion to continue the frame of the tales by describing other daily activities besides story telling.These frame tale interludes frequently include transcriptions of Italian folk songs.The interactions among tales in a day, or across days, as Boccaccio spins variations and reversals of previous material, forms a whole and not just a collection of stories. The basic plots of the stories including mocking the lust and greed of the clergy; tensions in Italian society between the new wealthy commercial class and noble families; the perils and adventures of traveling merchants.The title is a portmanteau, or combination of two Greek words meaning "ten" and "day".Boccacio made similar Greek etymological plays of words in his other works. The subtitle is Prencipe Galeotto, which derives from the opening material in which Boccaccio dedicates the work to ladies of the day who did not have the diversions of men (hunting, fishing, riding, falconry) who were forced to conceal their amorous passions and stay idle and concealed in their rooms.Thus, the book is subtitled Prencipe Galeotto, that is Galehaut, the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a nod to Dante's allusion to Galeotto in "Inferno V", who was blamed for the arousal of lust in the episode of Paolo and Francesca.

Throughout Decameron, the mercantile ethic prevails and predominates.The commercial and urban values of quick wit, sophistication, and intelligence are treasured, while the vices of stupidity and dullness are cured, or punished.While these traits and values will seem obvious to the modern reader, they were an emerging feature in Europe with the rise of urban centers and a monetized economic system beyond the traditional rural feudal and monastery systems, which placed greater value on piety and loyalty.Beyond the unity provided by the frame narrative, Decameron provides a unity in philosophical outlook.Throughout runs the common medieval theme of Lady Fortune, and how quickly one can rise and fall through the external influences of the "Wheel of Fortune".Boccaccio had been educated in the tradition of Dante's Divine Comedy, which used various levels of allegory to show the connections between the literal events of the story and the hidden Christian message.However, Decameron uses Dante's model not to educate the reader, but to satirize this method of learning.The Roman Catholic Church, priests, and religious belief become the satirical source of comedy throughout.This was part of a wider historical trend in the aftermath of the Black Death, which saw widespread discontent with the church.Many details of the Decameron are infused with a medieval sense of numerological and mystical significance.For example, it is widely believed that the seven young women are meant to represent the Four Cardinal Virtues (Prudence, Justice, Temperance, and Fortitude) and the Three Theological Virtues (Faith, Hope, and Charity).It is further supposed that the three men represent the classical Greek tripartite division of the soul (Reason, Spirit, and Lust, see Book IV of Republic).Boccaccio himself notes that the names he gives for these ten characters are in fact pseudonyms chosen as "appropriate to the qualities of each".The Italian names of the seven women, in the same (most likely significant) order as given in the text, are: Pampinea, Fiammetta, Filomena, Emilia, Lauretta, Neifile, and Elissa.The men, in order, are: Panfilo, Filostrato, and Dioneo.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.

5-0 out of 5 stars Bawdy tales of love
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
The "Decameron" is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353.It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.Other topics such as wit and witticism, practical jokes and worldly initiation also form part of the mosaic.Beyond its entertainment and literary popularity, it remains an important historical document of life in the fourteenth century.

Decameron is structured in a frame narrative, or frame tale.Boccaccio begins with a description of the Black Death and leads into an introduction of a group of seven young women and three young men who flee from plague-ridden Florence to a villa in the (then) countryside of Fiesole for two weeks.To pass the time, each member of the party tells one story for each one of the nights spent at the villa.Although fourteen days pass, two days each week are set aside: one day for chores and one holy day during which no work is done.In this manner, 100 stories are told by the end of the ten days.Each of the ten characters is charged as King or Queen of the company for one of the ten days in turn.This charge extends to choosing the theme of the stories for that day, and all but two days have topics assigned: examples of the power of fortune; examples of the power of human will; love tales that end tragically; love tales that end happily; clever replies that save the speaker; tricks that women play on men; tricks that people play on each other in general; examples of virtue.Only Dioneo, who usually tells the tenth tale each day, has the right to tell a tale on any topic he wishes, due to his wit.Each day also includes a short introduction and conclusion to continue the frame of the tales by describing other daily activities besides story telling.These frame tale interludes frequently include transcriptions of Italian folk songs.The interactions among tales in a day, or across days, as Boccaccio spins variations and reversals of previous material, forms a whole and not just a collection of stories. The basic plots of the stories including mocking the lust and greed of the clergy; tensions in Italian society between the new wealthy commercial class and noble families; the perils and adventures of traveling merchants.The title is a portmanteau, or combination of two Greek words meaning "ten" and "day".Boccacio made similar Greek etymological plays of words in his other works. The subtitle is Prencipe Galeotto, which derives from the opening material in which Boccaccio dedicates the work to ladies of the day who did not have the diversions of men (hunting, fishing, riding, falconry) who were forced to conceal their amorous passions and stay idle and concealed in their rooms.Thus, the book is subtitled Prencipe Galeotto, that is Galehaut, the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a nod to Dante's allusion to Galeotto in "Inferno V", who was blamed for the arousal of lust in the episode of Paolo and Francesca.

Throughout Decameron, the mercantile ethic prevails and predominates.The commercial and urban values of quick wit, sophistication, and intelligence are treasured, while the vices of stupidity and dullness are cured, or punished.While these traits and values will seem obvious to the modern reader, they were an emerging feature in Europe with the rise of urban centers and a monetized economic system beyond the traditional rural feudal and monastery systems, which placed greater value on piety and loyalty.Beyond the unity provided by the frame narrative, Decameron provides a unity in philosophical outlook.Throughout runs the common medieval theme of Lady Fortune, and how quickly one can rise and fall through the external influences of the "Wheel of Fortune".Boccaccio had been educated in the tradition of Dante's Divine Comedy, which used various levels of allegory to show the connections between the literal events of the story and the hidden Christian message.However, Decameron uses Dante's model not to educate the reader, but to satirize this method of learning.The Roman Catholic Church, priests, and religious belief become the satirical source of comedy throughout.This was part of a wider historical trend in the aftermath of the Black Death, which saw widespread discontent with the church.Many details of the Decameron are infused with a medieval sense of numerological and mystical significance.For example, it is widely believed that the seven young women are meant to represent the Four Cardinal Virtues (Prudence, Justice, Temperance, and Fortitude) and the Three Theological Virtues (Faith, Hope, and Charity).It is further supposed that the three men represent the classical Greek tripartite division of the soul (Reason, Spirit, and Lust, see Book IV of Republic).Boccaccio himself notes that the names he gives for these ten characters are in fact pseudonyms chosen as "appropriate to the qualities of each".The Italian names of the seven women, in the same (most likely significant) order as given in the text, are: Pampinea, Fiammetta, Filomena, Emilia, Lauretta, Neifile, and Elissa.The men, in order, are: Panfilo, Filostrato, and Dioneo.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.

5-0 out of 5 stars Bawdy tales of love
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
The "Decameron" is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353.It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.Other topics such as wit and witticism, practical jokes and worldly initiation also form part of the mosaic.Beyond its entertainment and literary popularity, it remains an important historical document of life in the fourteenth century.

Decameron is structured in a frame narrative, or frame tale.Boccaccio begins with a description of the Black Death and leads into an introduction of a group of seven young women and three young men who flee from plague-ridden Florence to a villa in the (then) countryside of Fiesole for two weeks.To pass the time, each member of the party tells one story for each one of the nights spent at the villa.Although fourteen days pass, two days each week are set aside: one day for chores and one holy day during which no work is done.In this manner, 100 stories are told by the end of the ten days.Each of the ten characters is charged as King or Queen of the company for one of the ten days in turn.This charge extends to choosing the theme of the stories for that day, and all but two days have topics assigned: examples of the power of fortune; examples of the power of human will; love tales that end tragically; love tales that end happily; clever replies that save the speaker; tricks that women play on men; tricks that people play on each other in general; examples of virtue.Only Dioneo, who usually tells the tenth tale each day, has the right to tell a tale on any topic he wishes, due to his wit.Each day also includes a short introduction and conclusion to continue the frame of the tales by describing other daily activities besides story telling.These frame tale interludes frequently include transcriptions of Italian folk songs.The interactions among tales in a day, or across days, as Boccaccio spins variations and reversals of previous material, forms a whole and not just a collection of stories. The basic plots of the stories including mocking the lust and greed of the clergy; tensions in Italian society between the new wealthy commercial class and noble families; the perils and adventures of traveling merchants.The title is a portmanteau, or combination of two Greek words meaning "ten" and "day".Boccacio made similar Greek etymological plays of words in his other works. The subtitle is Prencipe Galeotto, which derives from the opening material in which Boccaccio dedicates the work to ladies of the day who did not have the diversions of men (hunting, fishing, riding, falconry) who were forced to conceal their amorous passions and stay idle and concealed in their rooms.Thus, the book is subtitled Prencipe Galeotto, that is Galehaut, the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a nod to Dante's allusion to Galeotto in "Inferno V", who was blamed for the arousal of lust in the episode of Paolo and Francesca.

Throughout Decameron, the mercantile ethic prevails and predominates.The commercial and urban values of quick wit, sophistication, and intelligence are treasured, while the vices of stupidity and dullness are cured, or punished.While these traits and values will seem obvious to the modern reader, they were an emerging feature in Europe with the rise of urban centers and a monetized economic system beyond the traditional rural feudal and monastery systems, which placed greater value on piety and loyalty.Beyond the unity provided by the frame narrative, Decameron provides a unity in philosophical outlook.Throughout runs the common medieval theme of Lady Fortune, and how quickly one can rise and fall through the external influences of the "Wheel of Fortune".Boccaccio had been educated in the tradition of Dante's Divine Comedy, which used various levels of allegory to show the connections between the literal events of the story and the hidden Christian message.However, Decameron uses Dante's model not to educate the reader, but to satirize this method of learning.The Roman Catholic Church, priests, and religious belief become the satirical source of comedy throughout.This was part of a wider historical trend in the aftermath of the Black Death, which saw widespread discontent with the church.Many details of the Decameron are infused with a medieval sense of numerological and mystical significance.For example, it is widely believed that the seven young women are meant to represent the Four Cardinal Virtues (Prudence, Justice, Temperance, and Fortitude) and the Three Theological Virtues (Faith, Hope, and Charity).It is further supposed that the three men represent the classical Greek tripartite division of the soul (Reason, Spirit, and Lust, see Book IV of Republic).Boccaccio himself notes that the names he gives for these ten characters are in fact pseudonyms chosen as "appropriate to the qualities of each".The Italian names of the seven women, in the same (most likely significant) order as given in the text, are: Pampinea, Fiammetta, Filomena, Emilia, Lauretta, Neifile, and Elissa.The men, in order, are: Panfilo, Filostrato, and Dioneo.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.
... Read more


6. Concerning famous women / translated with an introduction and notes, by Guido A.Guarino
by Giovanni (1313-1375) Boccaccio
 Hardcover: Pages (1964-01-01)

Asin: B002BAGWLI
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7. Opere volgari di Giovanni Boccaccio, cor, su i testi a penna Volume 12-13 (Italian Edition)
by Boccaccio Giovanni 1313-1375, Moutier Ignazio ed
 Paperback: 538 Pages (2010-10-14)
list price: US$40.75 -- used & new: US$31.08
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1172150230
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8. Opere volgari di Giovanni Boccaccio, cor, su i testi a penna Volume 16-17 (Italian Edition)
by Boccaccio Giovanni 1313-1375, Moutier Ignazio ed
 Paperback: 584 Pages (2010-10-14)
list price: US$44.75 -- used & new: US$32.38
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1172150125
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9. Decameron Von Heinrich Steinhowel (German Edition)
by Boccaccio Giovanni 1313-1375
 Paperback: 538 Pages (2010-10-14)
list price: US$40.75 -- used & new: US$31.08
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1172119139
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10. Le Philocope De Messire Iean Boccace Florentin: Contenant L'histoire De Fleury & Blanchefleur. (French Edition)
by Boccaccio Giovanni 1313-1375, Sevin Adrien
 Paperback: 504 Pages (2010-10-15)
list price: US$39.75 -- used & new: US$31.08
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1172463700
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11. The Decameron or Ten Days Entertainment of Boccaccio (Giovanni, 1313-1375)
by Boccaccio
 Hardcover: Pages (1905-01-01)

Asin: B000GTNVQA
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12. Tales from Boccaccio.
by Boccaccio. Giovanni. 1313-1375.
 Paperback: Pages (1918-01-01)

Asin: B002WU09NY
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13. Boccaccio 's Olympia. ed. with an English rendering. by Israel G
by Boccaccio. Giovanni. 1313-1375.
 Paperback: Pages (1913-01-01)

Asin: B002WU8TAO
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14. Pearl : an English poem of the 14th century
by Giovanni, 1313-1375 Boccaccio
 Paperback: Pages (2009-10-26)

Asin: B003O5IXPW
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

15. GESAMMELTE WERKE (in 5 volumes) [Rösl-Klassiker]
by Giovanni di (1313-1375) (edited by Max Krell; translations by Karl Freiherrn von Beaulieu-Marconnay, Sophie Brentano, Wilhelm Neumann, Malte Overbeck, Karl Witte, and August Wilhelm Schlegel) Boccaccio
 Hardcover: Pages (1924)

Asin: B001PPVRP6
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16. Visualizing Boccaccio: Studies on Illustrations of the Decameron, from Giotto to Pasolini (Cambridge Studies in New Art History and Criticism)
by Jill M. Ricketts
Hardcover: 228 Pages (1997-03-28)
list price: US$133.00 -- used & new: US$34.90
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0521496004
Average Customer Review: 1.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
Visualizing Boccaccio represents a new approach to the interpretation of Boccaccio's classic book of erotic tales, The Decameron.In a comparison of selected tales from The Decameron with works by Cimabue and Giotto, fifteenth-century manuscript illumination, a series of paintings by Botticelli, and Pier Paolo Pasolini's cinematic interpretation of the tales, Ricketts demonstrates how the juxtaposition of verbal and visual renditions permits new interpretations of each of these works. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (1)

1-0 out of 5 stars title is misleading
The title of this book is misleading.
When you read title...Visualizing Boccaccio.. you expect some pictures and are very disappointed when you see couple black and white illustrations and paid 70 $.
I returnedbook to seller "Hudson book store" and never got refund. ... Read more


17. Decameron and the Philosophy of Storytelling: Author as Midwife and Pimp
by Richard Kuhns
Hardcover: 208 Pages (2005-04-15)
list price: US$50.00 -- used & new: US$5.94
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Asin: 0231136080
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In this creative and engaging reading, Richard Kuhns explores the ways in whichDecameron'ssexual themes lead into philosophical inquiry, moral argument, and aesthetic and literary criticism. As he reveals the stories' many philosophical insights and literary pleasures, Kuhns also examinesDecameronin the context of the nature of storytelling, its relationship to other classic works of literature, and the culture of trecento Italy.

Stories and storytelling are to be interpreted in terms of a wider cultural context that includes masks, metamorphosis, mythic themes, and character analysis, all of which Boccaccio explores with wit and subtlety. As a storyteller, Boccaccio represents himself as literary pimp, conceiving the relationship between storyteller and audience in sexual terms within a tradition that goes back as far as Socrates' conversations with the young Athenians.

As a whole, Boccaccio's great collection of stories creates a trenchant criticism of the ideas that dominated his social and cultural world. Addressed as it is to women who were denied opportunities for education, the author's stories create a university of wise and culturally observant texts. He teaches that comic, religious, sexual, and artistic themes can be seen to function as metaphors for hidden and often dangerous unorthodox thoughts.

Kuhns suggests thatDecameronis one of the first self-conscious creations of what we today call "a total work of art." Throughout the stories, Boccaccio creates a detailed picture of the Florentine trecento cultural world. Giotto, Buffalmacco, and other great painters of Boccaccio's time appear in the stories. Their works and the paintings that surround the characters as they prepare to leave the plague-ridden city, with their representations of Dante, Aquinas, and other thinkers, are essential to understanding the ways the stories work with other works of art and illuminate and enlarge interpretations of Boccaccio's book.

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18. Boccaccio: The Man and His Works
by Vittore Branca
 Paperback: 341 Pages (1984-01-01)
list price: US$15.00
Isbn: 0814710557
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19. A Rhetoric of the Decameron (Toronto Italian Studies)
by Marilyn Migiel
Hardcover: 220 Pages (2003-12-27)
list price: US$59.00 -- used & new: US$51.25
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Asin: 0802088198
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Both a passionate denunciation of masculinist readings of the Decameron and a meticulous critique of previous feminist analyses, Marilyn Migiel's A Rhetoric of the Decameron offers a sophisticated re-examination of the representations of women, men, gender identity, sexuality, love, hate, morality, and truth in Boccaccio's masterpiece. The Decameron stages an ongoing, dynamic, and spirited debate about issues as urgent now as in the fourteenth century ? a debate that can only be understood if the Decameron's rhetorical objectives and strategies are completely reconceived.

Addressing herself equally to those who argue for a proto-feminist Boccaccio ? a quasi-liberal champion of women's autonomy ? and to those who argue for a positivistically secure historical Boccaccio who could not possibly anticipate the concerns of the twenty-first century, Migiel challenges readers to pay attention to Boccaccio's language, to his pronouns, his passives, his echolalia, his patterns of repetition, and his figurative language. She argues that human experience, particularly in the sexual realm, is articulated differently by the Decameron's male and female narrators, and refutes the notion that the Decameron offers an undifferentiated celebration of Eros. Ultimately, Migiel contends, the stories of the Decameron suggest that as women become more empowered, the limitations on them, including the threat of violence, become more insistent.

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20. Boccaccio: Decameron (Landmarks of World Literature)
by David J. Wallace
Paperback: 132 Pages (1991-08-30)
list price: US$23.99 -- used & new: US$18.87
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0521388511
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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In Boccaccio's innovative text ten young people leave Florence to escape the Black Death of 1348, and organize their collective life in the countryside through the pleasure and discipline of storytelling. David Wallace guides the reader through their one hundred novelle, which explore both new and familiar conflicts with unprecendented subtlety, urgency and humor: everything from the struggle for domestic space, fought out between individual men and women, to the greater politics of the Mediterranean world where Christian and Arab meet. He emphasizes the relationship between the Decameron and the precocious proto-capitalist culture of Boccaccio's Florence. He also discusses gender issues and the influence of the text, particularly on Chaucer and on the novel. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Bawdy tales of love
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
The "Decameron" is a collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353.It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.Other topics such as wit and witticism, practical jokes and worldly initiation also form part of the mosaic.Beyond its entertainment and literary popularity, it remains an important historical document of life in the fourteenth century.

Decameron is structured in a frame narrative, or frame tale.Boccaccio begins with a description of the Black Death and leads into an introduction of a group of seven young women and three young men who flee from plague-ridden Florence to a villa in the (then) countryside of Fiesole for two weeks.To pass the time, each member of the party tells one story for each one of the nights spent at the villa.Although fourteen days pass, two days each week are set aside: one day for chores and one holy day during which no work is done.In this manner, 100 stories are told by the end of the ten days.Each of the ten characters is charged as King or Queen of the company for one of the ten days in turn.This charge extends to choosing the theme of the stories for that day, and all but two days have topics assigned: examples of the power of fortune; examples of the power of human will; love tales that end tragically; love tales that end happily; clever replies that save the speaker; tricks that women play on men; tricks that people play on each other in general; examples of virtue.Only Dioneo, who usually tells the tenth tale each day, has the right to tell a tale on any topic he wishes, due to his wit.Each day also includes a short introduction and conclusion to continue the frame of the tales by describing other daily activities besides story telling.These frame tale interludes frequently include transcriptions of Italian folk songs.The interactions among tales in a day, or across days, as Boccaccio spins variations and reversals of previous material, forms a whole and not just a collection of stories. The basic plots of the stories including mocking the lust and greed of the clergy; tensions in Italian society between the new wealthy commercial class and noble families; the perils and adventures of traveling merchants.The title is a portmanteau, or combination of two Greek words meaning "ten" and "day".Boccacio made similar Greek etymological plays of words in his other works. The subtitle is Prencipe Galeotto, which derives from the opening material in which Boccaccio dedicates the work to ladies of the day who did not have the diversions of men (hunting, fishing, riding, falconry) who were forced to conceal their amorous passions and stay idle and concealed in their rooms.Thus, the book is subtitled Prencipe Galeotto, that is Galehaut, the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a nod to Dante's allusion to Galeotto in "Inferno V", who was blamed for the arousal of lust in the episode of Paolo and Francesca.

Throughout Decameron, the mercantile ethic prevails and predominates.The commercial and urban values of quick wit, sophistication, and intelligence are treasured, while the vices of stupidity and dullness are cured, or punished.While these traits and values will seem obvious to the modern reader, they were an emerging feature in Europe with the rise of urban centers and a monetized economic system beyond the traditional rural feudal and monastery systems, which placed greater value on piety and loyalty.Beyond the unity provided by the frame narrative, Decameron provides a unity in philosophical outlook.Throughout runs the common medieval theme of Lady Fortune, and how quickly one can rise and fall through the external influences of the "Wheel of Fortune".Boccaccio had been educated in the tradition of Dante's Divine Comedy, which used various levels of allegory to show the connections between the literal events of the story and the hidden Christian message.However, Decameron uses Dante's model not to educate the reader, but to satirize this method of learning.The Roman Catholic Church, priests, and religious belief become the satirical source of comedy throughout.This was part of a wider historical trend in the aftermath of the Black Death, which saw widespread discontent with the church.Many details of the Decameron are infused with a medieval sense of numerological and mystical significance.For example, it is widely believed that the seven young women are meant to represent the Four Cardinal Virtues (Prudence, Justice, Temperance, and Fortitude) and the Three Theological Virtues (Faith, Hope, and Charity).It is further supposed that the three men represent the classical Greek tripartite division of the soul (Reason, Spirit, and Lust, see Book IV of Republic).Boccaccio himself notes that the names he gives for these ten characters are in fact pseudonyms chosen as "appropriate to the qualities of each".The Italian names of the seven women, in the same (most likely significant) order as given in the text, are: Pampinea, Fiammetta, Filomena, Emilia, Lauretta, Neifile, and Elissa.The men, in order, are: Panfilo, Filostrato, and Dioneo.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.
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