e99 Online Shopping Mall

Geometry.Net - the online learning center Help  
Home  - Book Author - Chesterton G K (Books)

  1-20 of 100 | Next 20
A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

click price to see details     click image to enlarge     click link to go to the store

$18.06
1. Alarms and discursions
$22.85
2. Tremendous trifles
 
$22.42
3. Varied types
$21.42
4. All things considered
$10.44
5. Lord Kitchener
$13.14
6. Charles Dickens
$20.76
7. Tremendous trifles
$18.32
8. Twelve types
$18.12
9. Twelve types
$14.53
10. The barbarism of Berlin
$11.57
11. The future of religion: Mr. G.
$22.59
12. A Chesterton calendar
$25.01
13. Robert Browning
$22.85
14. Manalive
$69.98
15. G.K. Chesterton (1874-1936): Creation
$21.37
16. All things considered
$11.83
17. Catholic truth in history
 
$16.86
18. St. Francis of Assisi
$13.72
19. The book of Job
$11.57
20. A shilling for my thoughts: being

1. Alarms and discursions
by G K. 1874-1936 Chesterton
Paperback: 322 Pages (2010-06-25)
list price: US$30.75 -- used & new: US$18.06
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1175902721
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words.This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book. ... Read more


2. Tremendous trifles
by G K. 1874-1936 Chesterton
Paperback: 342 Pages (2010-09-04)
list price: US$31.75 -- used & new: US$22.85
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1178358488
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description

Chesterton's 39 short essays are the result, he says, of "sitting still and letting marvels and adventures settle on him like flies." Actually, he does move around — Germany, France, and on foot in England when he tires of waiting for a train. Full of both good sense and nonsense, his commentaries remain an absolute delight.
... Read more

Customer Reviews (6)

4-0 out of 5 stars A Different Look at Chesterton
I have read some of G.K. Chesterton's fiction and religious non-fiction but had never read any of his newspaper articles. These reflections cover a variety of topics -- mostly light. I enjoyed them for his opinions, style, and the fact that they are short stories that can be read when just a few minutes are available. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to see another side of Chesterton's interests and writing skills.

4-0 out of 5 stars Classic Chesterton
This is a compilation of essays written for his newspaper column. I am always impressed by his poetic and detailed descriptions of the world around him. He covers a variety of subjects and always turns the observations about life into truths that I did not expect. Among my favorites: A Piece of Chalk--where a drawing exercise turns into a lesson on the nature of truth, The Dragon's Grandmother--on why we should read fairy tales to our children, and Twelve Men--the best explanation I have read on why we have juries made of our peers and not professional jurors.

5-0 out of 5 stars G.K. Lite
Anyone new to Mr. Chesterson's writings will find this book fun and entertaining. It will give you a glimpse into the genius of Chesterton's brilliant mind. Then you must move on to the more meaty, weighty, substantive philosophic works: Orthodoxy and The Everlasting Man.

5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful writing makes for wonderful reading
If you're a fan of great writing, you'll be a fan of this collection.Each story within the collection is short, maximum 4 pages, and they get right to the point.However, like any great story, they save the best for last and you will find yourself looking forward to reading the last paragraph within each story as it is truly the best and most invigorating.Chesterton's control of the English language is stunning and his direct matter of proving a thing is awe-inspiring.If you're a fan of his other works, you may like this one even more because it doesn't take as long to get the same great Chesterton-messages out of the reading.I give this book 5 stars because it really is wonderful when you don't have all day to read, yet still want to learn something or be motivated that the world is not all bad throughout the day.If you've got 15 spare minutes, thats enough to flip through one of these stories and feel better about yourself and the world.

4-0 out of 5 stars A Century of Wonders
2009 marks the hundredth anniversary of this book from 1909, which is a collection of columns the author penned for a British newspaper, the Daily Mail. As such it's a mixed bag; some of the writing is, in my view a 3, and some a 5, thus my rating of a 4. Sometimes I don't know what he's talking about. Other times I find myself quoting a paragraph in an e-mail. This book contains my first encounter with Chesterton, a brief essay called "On Lying in Bed", which I still think one of his best. But when I began this book, although I avidly devour G.K.'s novels, and some of his nonfiction, like Orthodoxy, this one didn't hold me.

I returned to it now and then, as one does, after reading rather more gripping reads. Then its magic kicked in, and in my view, some of the later essays, particularly those that are travelogues, are the best. Other readers will have their favorites; some of mine are:" The advantages of Having One Leg"; "The Twelve Men"; "The Wind and the Trees"; "In Topsy-Turvy Land"; "The Tower"; "The Orthodox Barber"; "Humanity: An Interlude"; "The Little Birds Who Won't Sing"; "The Travellers in State"; "The Prehistoric Railway Station"; "A Glimpse of My Country"; and "The Ballade of a Strange Town".

That's my dozen keepers from these 39 essays, a rather good haul from a book a century old. The difficulty in this volume is that the references, as in most newspaper columns, are to current controversies, culture, and even jokes of the day. The reason this book celebrates a centennial when so many others of the era are forgotten, is because for Chesterton, those passing fancies, all the rage at the moment, are signposts to conditions common to humanity. That's why he remains so quotable. But neither did he write vaguely about universals; he observed and commented on particular people and places in his time. That's why he remains readable.

Few read the sort of column collected here in our day, and fewer now write it. What one notices on reading any Chesterton, however, on dipping into any book almost anywhere, is his delight in living, and looking, and reuminating. This is not a self-help book, but any reader who helps him or herself to it, may be helped regardless, to see more, and enjoy life more. Because his message at bottom is it's OK to enjoy life, to see it as a good gift, to be thankful and revel in it. This is not the frantic optimism of a prescriptive self-help book. To Chesterton, it's simple realism. As he writes in "The Ballade of a Strange Town":

"The false optimism, the modern happiness, tires us because it tells us we fit into this world. The true happiness is that we don't fit. We come from somewhere else. We have lost our way." A hundred years later these words still ring true. Which is why we're still reading him. ... Read more


3. Varied types
by G K. 1874-1936 Chesterton, Bret Harte
 Paperback: 290 Pages (2010-09-10)
list price: US$28.75 -- used & new: US$22.42
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1172334455
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923.This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process.We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book. ... Read more


4. All things considered
by G K. 1874-1936 Chesterton
Paperback: 310 Pages (2010-08-30)
list price: US$29.75 -- used & new: US$21.42
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1178102351
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.This is an OCR edition with typos.Excerpt from book:The Fallacy of Success © © ©rF"HERE has appeared in our time a particular class of books and articles which I sincerely and solemnly think may be called the silliest ever known among men. They are much more wild than the wildest romances of chivalry and much more dull than the dullest religious tract. Moreover, the romances of chivalry were at least about chivalry; the religious tracts are about religion. But these things are about nothing ; they are about what is called Success. On every bookstall, in every magazine, you may find works telling people how to succeed. They are books showing men how to succeed in everything; they are written by men who cannot even succeed in writing books. To begin with, of course, there is no such thing as Success. Or, if you like to put it so, there is nothing that is not successful. That a thing is successful merely means that it is; a millionaire is successful in being a millionaire and a donkey in being a donkey. Any live manhas succeeded in living; any dead man may have succeeded in committing suicide. But, passing over the bad logic and bad philosophy in the phrase, we may take it, as these writers do, in the ordinary sense of success in obtaining money or worldly position. These writers profess to tell the ordinary man how he may succeed in his trade or speculation—how, if he is a builder, he may succeed as a builder; how, if he is a stockbroker, he may succeed as a stockbroker. They profess to show him how, if he is a grocer, he may become a sporting yachtsman; how, if he is a tenth-rate journalist, he may become a peer; and how, if he is a German Jew, he may become an Anglo-Saxon. This is a definite and business-like proposal, and I really think that the people who buy these books (if any people do buy them) have a moral, if not a ... ... Read more

Customer Reviews (7)

5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful book!Lovely edition!
This book is a great collection of wonderful newspaper stories of Chesterton, and as reverent today as when written!Enjoy!

5-0 out of 5 stars This book is perfect!
First, this book is in perfect shape - I think some reviews were of a different edition.

But more important, is this wonderful book!This is a collection of various newspaper columns by Chesterton - thus ``All Things Considered`` - what is also fascinating is the fact that while one expects the wit, charm, humor and intelligence to last the years, (and it does), the issues of the day, while different on the surface, are no different than those in Rome 2000 years ago, or the USA 100 years later, (today).

If you like Chesterton, you`ll love reading one of these columns each night!

5-0 out of 5 stars This is a great book and PERFECT copy!
I bought this with out looking at the reviews (generally they liked the book and did not like the edition), anyway, I wanted to report back that somehow this has been fixed, as this edition is perfect in every way!Fell good to get it, and read GK's views on everything, as he considers 'all things'.Ok, I'm not witty, but I know a good book when I read it!This is it!

5-0 out of 5 stars This edition is perfect!
This edition is perfect!For those who were wondering if they would get a poorlymade book based on the only 1 star review, let me assure you that you will not, I received this book without any mistakes, or missing pages, etc.Its a charming and complete edition.

I see that the release date for this edition is after the date the 1 star review was made.

This book has been well reviewed already, and all I can add is this is a real treat for anyone who loves intelligent argument, wit and written brilliance!

1-0 out of 5 stars Shoddy
All Things Considered

First time I can recall seeing an advertisement masquerading as an "Editorial Review." I cannot abide Kessinger and its mission to re-appropriate books (often mere pamphlets) in the public domain and republish them in shoddy overpriced editions. Wankers. ... Read more


5. Lord Kitchener
by G K. 1874-1936 Chesterton
Paperback: 50 Pages (2010-06-07)
list price: US$16.75 -- used & new: US$10.44
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1149928158
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words.This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book. ... Read more


6. Charles Dickens
by G K. 1874-1936 Chesterton, Frederic George Kitton
Paperback: 60 Pages (2010-08-30)
list price: US$17.75 -- used & new: US$13.14
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1178105296
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
Originally published in 1906.This volume from the Cornell University Library's print collections was scanned on an APT BookScan and converted to JPG 2000 format by Kirtas Technologies.All titles scanned cover to cover and pages may include marks notations and other marginalia present in the original volume. ... Read more


7. Tremendous trifles
by G K. 1874-1936 Chesterton
Paperback: 286 Pages (2010-09-01)
list price: US$28.75 -- used & new: US$20.76
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1178216993
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description

Chesterton's 39 short essays are the result, he says, of "sitting still and letting marvels and adventures settle on him like flies." Actually, he does move around — Germany, France, and on foot in England when he tires of waiting for a train. Full of both good sense and nonsense, his commentaries remain an absolute delight.
... Read more

Customer Reviews (6)

4-0 out of 5 stars A Different Look at Chesterton
I have read some of G.K. Chesterton's fiction and religious non-fiction but had never read any of his newspaper articles. These reflections cover a variety of topics -- mostly light. I enjoyed them for his opinions, style, and the fact that they are short stories that can be read when just a few minutes are available. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to see another side of Chesterton's interests and writing skills.

4-0 out of 5 stars Classic Chesterton
This is a compilation of essays written for his newspaper column. I am always impressed by his poetic and detailed descriptions of the world around him. He covers a variety of subjects and always turns the observations about life into truths that I did not expect. Among my favorites: A Piece of Chalk--where a drawing exercise turns into a lesson on the nature of truth, The Dragon's Grandmother--on why we should read fairy tales to our children, and Twelve Men--the best explanation I have read on why we have juries made of our peers and not professional jurors.

5-0 out of 5 stars G.K. Lite
Anyone new to Mr. Chesterson's writings will find this book fun and entertaining. It will give you a glimpse into the genius of Chesterton's brilliant mind. Then you must move on to the more meaty, weighty, substantive philosophic works: Orthodoxy and The Everlasting Man.

5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful writing makes for wonderful reading
If you're a fan of great writing, you'll be a fan of this collection.Each story within the collection is short, maximum 4 pages, and they get right to the point.However, like any great story, they save the best for last and you will find yourself looking forward to reading the last paragraph within each story as it is truly the best and most invigorating.Chesterton's control of the English language is stunning and his direct matter of proving a thing is awe-inspiring.If you're a fan of his other works, you may like this one even more because it doesn't take as long to get the same great Chesterton-messages out of the reading.I give this book 5 stars because it really is wonderful when you don't have all day to read, yet still want to learn something or be motivated that the world is not all bad throughout the day.If you've got 15 spare minutes, thats enough to flip through one of these stories and feel better about yourself and the world.

4-0 out of 5 stars A Century of Wonders
2009 marks the hundredth anniversary of this book from 1909, which is a collection of columns the author penned for a British newspaper, the Daily Mail. As such it's a mixed bag; some of the writing is, in my view a 3, and some a 5, thus my rating of a 4. Sometimes I don't know what he's talking about. Other times I find myself quoting a paragraph in an e-mail. This book contains my first encounter with Chesterton, a brief essay called "On Lying in Bed", which I still think one of his best. But when I began this book, although I avidly devour G.K.'s novels, and some of his nonfiction, like Orthodoxy, this one didn't hold me.

I returned to it now and then, as one does, after reading rather more gripping reads. Then its magic kicked in, and in my view, some of the later essays, particularly those that are travelogues, are the best. Other readers will have their favorites; some of mine are:" The advantages of Having One Leg"; "The Twelve Men"; "The Wind and the Trees"; "In Topsy-Turvy Land"; "The Tower"; "The Orthodox Barber"; "Humanity: An Interlude"; "The Little Birds Who Won't Sing"; "The Travellers in State"; "The Prehistoric Railway Station"; "A Glimpse of My Country"; and "The Ballade of a Strange Town".

That's my dozen keepers from these 39 essays, a rather good haul from a book a century old. The difficulty in this volume is that the references, as in most newspaper columns, are to current controversies, culture, and even jokes of the day. The reason this book celebrates a centennial when so many others of the era are forgotten, is because for Chesterton, those passing fancies, all the rage at the moment, are signposts to conditions common to humanity. That's why he remains so quotable. But neither did he write vaguely about universals; he observed and commented on particular people and places in his time. That's why he remains readable.

Few read the sort of column collected here in our day, and fewer now write it. What one notices on reading any Chesterton, however, on dipping into any book almost anywhere, is his delight in living, and looking, and reuminating. This is not a self-help book, but any reader who helps him or herself to it, may be helped regardless, to see more, and enjoy life more. Because his message at bottom is it's OK to enjoy life, to see it as a good gift, to be thankful and revel in it. This is not the frantic optimism of a prescriptive self-help book. To Chesterton, it's simple realism. As he writes in "The Ballade of a Strange Town":

"The false optimism, the modern happiness, tires us because it tells us we fit into this world. The true happiness is that we don't fit. We come from somewhere else. We have lost our way." A hundred years later these words still ring true. Which is why we're still reading him. ... Read more


8. Twelve types
by G K. 1874-1936 Chesterton
Paperback: 218 Pages (2010-08-31)
list price: US$24.75 -- used & new: US$18.32
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1178159493
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.This is an OCR edition with typos.Excerpt from book:THE OPTIMISM OF BYRONEvebything is against our appreciating the spirit and the age of Byron. The age that has just passed from us is always like a dream when we wake in the morning, a thing incredible and centuries away. And the world of Byron seems a sad and faded world, a weird and inhuman world, where men were romantic in whiskers, ladies lived, apparently, in bowers, and the very word has the sound of a piece of stage scenery. Roses and nightingales recur in their poetry with the monotonouselegance of a wall-paper pattern. Thewhole is like a revel of dead men, a revel with splendid vesture and half-witted faces.But the more shrewdly and earnestly we study the histories of men, the less ready shall we be to make use of the word "artificial." Nothing in the world has ever been artificial. Many customs, many dresses, many works of art are branded with artificiality because they exhibit vanity and self-consciousness: as if vanity were not a deep and elemental thing, like love and hate and the fear of death. Vanity may be found in darkling deserts, in the hermit and in the wild beasts that crawl around him. It may be good or evil, but assuredly it is not artificial: vanity is a voice out of the abyss.The remarkable fact is, however, and it bears strongly on the present position of Byron, that when a thing is unfamiliar to us, when it is remote and the product of some other age or spirit, we think it not savage or terrible, but merely artificial. There are many instances of this: a fair one is the case of tropical plants and birds. When we see some of the monstrous and flamboyant blossoms that enrich the equatorial woods, we do not feel that they are conflagrations of nature; silent explosions of her frightful energy. We simply find it hard to believe that they are n... ... Read more

Customer Reviews (3)

3-0 out of 5 stars Fine Collection of Essays but This is Not a Book
This review is focused on the IHS edition of "Twelve Types." While "Twelve Types" is one of Chesterton's earliest works--he was not even 30 when he wrote it--there is much to ponder in his twelve sketches of leading thinkers and figures of the last millennium. While Chesterton was a fine biographer, as his later works on St. Francis--who is one of the figures sketched in an essay in "Twelve Types"--and St. Thomas Aquinas show, the subtitle is not correct. These are not "mini-biographies." These are quick glimpses of one aspect or another of figures ranging from Charles II to Tolstoy. There is much to kick over in these pieces though some of these essays are free-wheeling, even by Chesterton's standards. While this book is not the classic that some of Chesterton's other works are, it is still a profitable and enjoyable read.

So why three stars? This "book" was less than 100 pages--of which less than 75 are from Chesterton. IHS could have easily placed this in another book of Chesterton's. The introduction was fine but the notes seemed a bit too much. We may need notes to tell us Randolph Churchill was. We do not need notes to tell us about the artist Chesterton calls "Michael Angelo" was or that "Punch and Judy" are a puppet show. I have a high opinion of IHS but they could have included this with another work of Chesterton instead of publishing this slip of a book.

5-0 out of 5 stars We admire ruined monasteries. Why not ruined men as well?
"GKC" was pushing 30 when TWELVE TYPES was pulled together in book form in 1903. It made his literary reputation among the cognoscenti of England.

His little essays touch on one woman and eleven men. All twelve "types" are well known, although for different skills, including writing, thinking, brooding or kinging it.

Charlotte Bronte wrote of plain people with big, sometimes tortured souls. William Morris found the 19th Century ugly and tried to reshape it in stained glass and cloth to evoke better bygone ages.

Lord Byron wore many disguises, including pessimism. Robert Louis Stevenson was even more a man of masks. Alexander Pope knew, generously, that people worth satirizing had to have a core of value. He made his witty, wise couplets look easy. But no one who has copied him has been remotely so good.

What did Francis of Assisi and Edmund Rostand share? They were great poets, first and foremost. Francis loved life and people more happily than anyone before or since. Rostand's soldiers dying in fear of the crows that would soon pluck out their eyes cheered for Napoleon one last "Vive l'empereur!."

That idlest but most despotic of Stuart Kings, Charles II, was a thorough sceptic. He was not just sceptical about this or that. He doubted everything. Even in turning Catholic and taking communion on his deathbed, he might muse, "The wafer might not be God, similarly it might not be a wafer." Charles's restoration in 1660 was a revolt "of the debris of human nature." Men of the Restoration, weak Epicureans all, were masters of killing time. Higher Epicureans "make time live."

Thomas Carlyle believed his message to be true and important but did not think it important to persuade others. Count Tolstoy saw the simplicity of "mere Christianity" but then tried to codify it in rules. Michelangelo was a friend of the austere Dominican Monk of Florence Savonarola and would gladly have tossed his greatest works into the "bonfire of the vanities" if he thought its flames signaled "the dawn of a younger and wiser world."

Finally, Sir Walter Scott. He is the eternal king of romance and romance touches the deepest core of human nature. First impressions are deepest. And boys are therefore right to pay more attention to Bruce's plume than to his hatreds. Sir Walter tells a story lovingly. He invites us to sip it like wine and not gulp it down like bitter medicine.

TWELVE TYPES is a book to pull out of our pocket when the world grows too much with us. It is wise, consoling, provocative. It is over a hundred years old And don't we all wish that we could write something half so timely! -OOO-

5-0 out of 5 stars A HEAVY READ, BUT NECESSARY
This is one of Chesterton's smallest books, but boy is it packed with knowledge.If you are considering a career in literary criticism you would do well to purchase this book.At times, because Chesterton can be so deep, it is hard to follow.But there are good footnotes in the back of the book.Read it slowly, and savor every moment. ... Read more


9. Twelve types
by G K. 1874-1936 Chesterton
Paperback: 216 Pages (2010-08-17)
list price: US$24.75 -- used & new: US$18.12
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1177315483
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.This is an OCR edition with typos.Excerpt from book:THE OPTIMISM OF BYRONEvebything is against our appreciating the spirit and the age of Byron. The age that has just passed from us is always like a dream when we wake in the morning, a thing incredible and centuries away. And the world of Byron seems a sad and faded world, a weird and inhuman world, where men were romantic in whiskers, ladies lived, apparently, in bowers, and the very word has the sound of a piece of stage scenery. Roses and nightingales recur in their poetry with the monotonouselegance of a wall-paper pattern. Thewhole is like a revel of dead men, a revel with splendid vesture and half-witted faces.But the more shrewdly and earnestly we study the histories of men, the less ready shall we be to make use of the word "artificial." Nothing in the world has ever been artificial. Many customs, many dresses, many works of art are branded with artificiality because they exhibit vanity and self-consciousness: as if vanity were not a deep and elemental thing, like love and hate and the fear of death. Vanity may be found in darkling deserts, in the hermit and in the wild beasts that crawl around him. It may be good or evil, but assuredly it is not artificial: vanity is a voice out of the abyss.The remarkable fact is, however, and it bears strongly on the present position of Byron, that when a thing is unfamiliar to us, when it is remote and the product of some other age or spirit, we think it not savage or terrible, but merely artificial. There are many instances of this: a fair one is the case of tropical plants and birds. When we see some of the monstrous and flamboyant blossoms that enrich the equatorial woods, we do not feel that they are conflagrations of nature; silent explosions of her frightful energy. We simply find it hard to believe that they are n... ... Read more

Customer Reviews (3)

3-0 out of 5 stars Fine Collection of Essays but This is Not a Book
This review is focused on the IHS edition of "Twelve Types." While "Twelve Types" is one of Chesterton's earliest works--he was not even 30 when he wrote it--there is much to ponder in his twelve sketches of leading thinkers and figures of the last millennium. While Chesterton was a fine biographer, as his later works on St. Francis--who is one of the figures sketched in an essay in "Twelve Types"--and St. Thomas Aquinas show, the subtitle is not correct. These are not "mini-biographies." These are quick glimpses of one aspect or another of figures ranging from Charles II to Tolstoy. There is much to kick over in these pieces though some of these essays are free-wheeling, even by Chesterton's standards. While this book is not the classic that some of Chesterton's other works are, it is still a profitable and enjoyable read.

So why three stars? This "book" was less than 100 pages--of which less than 75 are from Chesterton. IHS could have easily placed this in another book of Chesterton's. The introduction was fine but the notes seemed a bit too much. We may need notes to tell us Randolph Churchill was. We do not need notes to tell us about the artist Chesterton calls "Michael Angelo" was or that "Punch and Judy" are a puppet show. I have a high opinion of IHS but they could have included this with another work of Chesterton instead of publishing this slip of a book.

5-0 out of 5 stars We admire ruined monasteries. Why not ruined men as well?
"GKC" was pushing 30 when TWELVE TYPES was pulled together in book form in 1903. It made his literary reputation among the cognoscenti of England.

His little essays touch on one woman and eleven men. All twelve "types" are well known, although for different skills, including writing, thinking, brooding or kinging it.

Charlotte Bronte wrote of plain people with big, sometimes tortured souls. William Morris found the 19th Century ugly and tried to reshape it in stained glass and cloth to evoke better bygone ages.

Lord Byron wore many disguises, including pessimism. Robert Louis Stevenson was even more a man of masks. Alexander Pope knew, generously, that people worth satirizing had to have a core of value. He made his witty, wise couplets look easy. But no one who has copied him has been remotely so good.

What did Francis of Assisi and Edmund Rostand share? They were great poets, first and foremost. Francis loved life and people more happily than anyone before or since. Rostand's soldiers dying in fear of the crows that would soon pluck out their eyes cheered for Napoleon one last "Vive l'empereur!."

That idlest but most despotic of Stuart Kings, Charles II, was a thorough sceptic. He was not just sceptical about this or that. He doubted everything. Even in turning Catholic and taking communion on his deathbed, he might muse, "The wafer might not be God, similarly it might not be a wafer." Charles's restoration in 1660 was a revolt "of the debris of human nature." Men of the Restoration, weak Epicureans all, were masters of killing time. Higher Epicureans "make time live."

Thomas Carlyle believed his message to be true and important but did not think it important to persuade others. Count Tolstoy saw the simplicity of "mere Christianity" but then tried to codify it in rules. Michelangelo was a friend of the austere Dominican Monk of Florence Savonarola and would gladly have tossed his greatest works into the "bonfire of the vanities" if he thought its flames signaled "the dawn of a younger and wiser world."

Finally, Sir Walter Scott. He is the eternal king of romance and romance touches the deepest core of human nature. First impressions are deepest. And boys are therefore right to pay more attention to Bruce's plume than to his hatreds. Sir Walter tells a story lovingly. He invites us to sip it like wine and not gulp it down like bitter medicine.

TWELVE TYPES is a book to pull out of our pocket when the world grows too much with us. It is wise, consoling, provocative. It is over a hundred years old And don't we all wish that we could write something half so timely! -OOO-

5-0 out of 5 stars A HEAVY READ, BUT NECESSARY
This is one of Chesterton's smallest books, but boy is it packed with knowledge.If you are considering a career in literary criticism you would do well to purchase this book.At times, because Chesterton can be so deep, it is hard to follow.But there are good footnotes in the back of the book.Read it slowly, and savor every moment. ... Read more


10. The barbarism of Berlin
by G K. 1874-1936 Chesterton
Paperback: 108 Pages (2010-08-09)
list price: US$19.75 -- used & new: US$14.53
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1177128969
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923.This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process.We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (1)

4-0 out of 5 stars Compelling arguments (a history teacher's review)
G.K. Chesterton's "The Barbarism of Berlin" is a lengthy essay (442 kindle "locations") defending the decision by the U.K. to join World War I and fight the Central Powers, Germany in particular.

It is a testament to Chesterton's powerful skills as a writer that I found myself agreeing with him so much because I've typically found World War I to have been one of the most extraordinary wastes of lives in the long history of a world that regularly wastes lives.

Chesterton makes a compelling argument that Germany's outlook on the world is different than France's and England's and that these competing worldviews are bound to confront. Eventually, one will win out - thus the war. Or, as he buts it, Germany has "the perfectly serious aim of destroying certain ideas, which, as they think, the world has outgrown; without which, as we think, the world will die." (location 118)

The essay is a bit dated by anachronstic racial terms and stereotypes, acceptable then but not now but a knowledgeable reader understands that the world is a different place now. Worthy of your time if you are a history buff, especially a student of "The War to End All Wars." ... Read more


11. The future of religion: Mr. G. K. Chesterton's reply to Mr. Bernard Shaw
by G K. 1874-1936 Chesterton
Paperback: 28 Pages (2010-08-01)
list price: US$15.75 -- used & new: US$11.57
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1176635506
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

12. A Chesterton calendar
by G K. 1874-1936 Chesterton
Paperback: 440 Pages (2010-08-19)
list price: US$35.75 -- used & new: US$22.59
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1177477874
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
Originally published in 1911.This volume from the Cornell University Library's print collections was scanned on an APT BookScan and converted to JPG 2000 format by Kirtas Technologies.All titles scanned cover to cover and pages may include marks notations and other marginalia present in the original volume. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Everyday Chesterton
With Chesterton on your schedule, you'll always remember that it is a joy to be late! ... Read more


13. Robert Browning
by G K. 1874-1936 Chesterton
Paperback: 420 Pages (2010-08-06)
list price: US$34.75 -- used & new: US$25.01
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1176948083
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.This is an OCR edition with typos.Excerpt from book:CHAPTER IIIBROWNING AND HIS MARRIAGERgbert Browning had his faults, and the general direction of those faults has been previously suggested. The chief of his faults, a certain uncontrollable brutality of speech and gesture when he was strongly roused, was destined to cling to him all through his life, and to startle with the blaze of a volcano even the last quiet years before his death. But any one who wishes to understand how deep was the elemental honesty and reality of his character, how profoundly worthy he was of any love that was bestowed upon him, need only study one most striking and determining element in the question — Browning's simple, heartfelt, and unlimited admiration for other people. He was one of a generation of great men, of great men who had a certain peculiar type, certain peculiar merits and defects. Carlyle, Tennyson, Ruskin, Matthew Arnold, were alike in being children of a very strenuous and conscientious age, alike in possessing its earnestness and air of deciding great matters, alike also in showing a certain almost noble jealousy, a certain restlessness, a certain fear of other influences. Browning alone had no fear; he welcomed, evidently without the least affectation, all the influences of his day.; A very interesting letter of his remains in which he describeshis pleasure in a university dinner. " Praise," he says in effect, "was given very deservedly to Matthew Arnold and Swinburne, and to that pride of Oxford men, Clough." The really striking thing about these three names is the fact that they are united in Browning's praise in a way in which they are by no means united in each other's. Matthew Arnold, in one of his extant letters, calls Swinburne "a young pseudo- Shelley," who, according to Arnold, thinks he can make Greek plays good by ma... ... Read more


14. Manalive
by G K. 1874-1936 Chesterton
Paperback: 326 Pages (2010-08-03)
list price: US$31.75 -- used & new: US$22.85
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1176803697
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
Perhaps the most light-hearted of all Chesterton’s "serious" works, Manalive pits a group of disillusioned young people against Mr. Innocent Smith, a bubbly, high-spirited gentleman who literally falls into their midst. Accused of murder and denounced for repeatedly marrying his wife and attempting to live in various houses (all of which turn out to be his own), Smith prompts his newfound acquaintances to recognize an important idea: that life is worth living.
... Read more

Customer Reviews (25)

1-0 out of 5 stars Great book, horrible edition
This is one of my favorite novels, so I bought it for my brother-in-law as a graduation present. This edition is awful: tacky cover, horrible layout, each page has the little blips that come from being scanned. Buy a different edition.

5-0 out of 5 stars Manalive!
I really enjoyed this book. It is, like all Chesterton books, a little tough to get through if you are not accustomed to his writing style and language. The story itself is riveting. As someone who sometimes gets to focused on the end result, it was a good reminder to live.

5-0 out of 5 stars fist pumping good
I'm a huge Chesterton fan- at used bookstores I'll pick up everything by him they have, just so that I can give them away to friends, family, and interested strangers.

This is the work of Chesterton's I've read the most.I'll pick this up at least once a year for a re-read. It is packed full of humor, wisdom, insights into society, and all wrapped up in a darn good plot.

There are ideas in here that shook me, as Chesterton often does, with his counter-intuitive insights.The early passage on how the more exciting and important a thing is, the more likely that rules are to be built around it out of sheer exuberance utterly destroys the common argument against Christianity that the "Man Made Rules of the Church" destroyed the "Message of Jesus."

I don't know if Chuck Palahniuk read this book, but there is a scene from Fight Club that appears to have been inspired by manalive, where "life is fired from the end of a gun."

If you're new to Chesterton, and want to know where to start, start here.This is always the book I recommend be read first- even if you're looking to Chesterton for his Christian apologetics.Read this before you read Orthodoxy.

Love it, love it, love it.

3-0 out of 5 stars don't dig his fiction... read his non fiction
though filled with a few awesome quotes the story as a whole is BORING! I couldn't finish. I love the monologues if Mr Smith. There are many great quotes on life an such, but getting through the dumb story bits was a bit much... this was my first chesterton book, so i didn't pick up another one by him for long time afterward, but i read "the everlasting man" (which was a big factor in C.S.Lewis' conversion) and couldn't put it down, and followed with "orthodoxy" which again i couldn't put down. about to read "heretics" ... i strongly recommend chesterton, but your time is better spent reading his other works, save this one when you have nothing else to read.

1-0 out of 5 stars Beware This Edition!
Although not labeled as such, this is a print-on-demand book (the telltale sign is an output date on the last page). The odd dimensions (7.5" x 9.25") and the abundance of errors in typographymake it difficult to read. There is also the added concern that since there is absolutely no front matter supplied not even as to the source edition scanned that this may be an altered or abridged version. Find yourself a better edition. ... Read more


15. G.K. Chesterton (1874-1936): Creation romanesque et imagination (Bibliotheque de l'Universite de Haute-Alsace) (French Edition)
by Max Ribstein
Paperback: 294 Pages (1981)
-- used & new: US$69.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 2252023309
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

16. All things considered
by G K. 1874-1936 Chesterton
Paperback: 310 Pages (2010-08-09)
list price: US$29.75 -- used & new: US$21.37
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1177120542
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.This is an OCR edition with typos.Excerpt from book:The Fallacy of Success © © ©rF"HERE has appeared in our time a particular class of books and articles which I sincerely and solemnly think may be called the silliest ever known among men. They are much more wild than the wildest romances of chivalry and much more dull than the dullest religious tract. Moreover, the romances of chivalry were at least about chivalry; the religious tracts are about religion. But these things are about nothing ; they are about what is called Success. On every bookstall, in every magazine, you may find works telling people how to succeed. They are books showing men how to succeed in everything; they are written by men who cannot even succeed in writing books. To begin with, of course, there is no such thing as Success. Or, if you like to put it so, there is nothing that is not successful. That a thing is successful merely means that it is; a millionaire is successful in being a millionaire and a donkey in being a donkey. Any live manhas succeeded in living; any dead man may have succeeded in committing suicide. But, passing over the bad logic and bad philosophy in the phrase, we may take it, as these writers do, in the ordinary sense of success in obtaining money or worldly position. These writers profess to tell the ordinary man how he may succeed in his trade or speculation—how, if he is a builder, he may succeed as a builder; how, if he is a stockbroker, he may succeed as a stockbroker. They profess to show him how, if he is a grocer, he may become a sporting yachtsman; how, if he is a tenth-rate journalist, he may become a peer; and how, if he is a German Jew, he may become an Anglo-Saxon. This is a definite and business-like proposal, and I really think that the people who buy these books (if any people do buy them) have a moral, if not a ... ... Read more

Customer Reviews (7)

5-0 out of 5 stars Wonderful book!Lovely edition!
This book is a great collection of wonderful newspaper stories of Chesterton, and as reverent today as when written!Enjoy!

5-0 out of 5 stars This book is perfect!
First, this book is in perfect shape - I think some reviews were of a different edition.

But more important, is this wonderful book!This is a collection of various newspaper columns by Chesterton - thus ``All Things Considered`` - what is also fascinating is the fact that while one expects the wit, charm, humor and intelligence to last the years, (and it does), the issues of the day, while different on the surface, are no different than those in Rome 2000 years ago, or the USA 100 years later, (today).

If you like Chesterton, you`ll love reading one of these columns each night!

5-0 out of 5 stars This is a great book and PERFECT copy!
I bought this with out looking at the reviews (generally they liked the book and did not like the edition), anyway, I wanted to report back that somehow this has been fixed, as this edition is perfect in every way!Fell good to get it, and read GK's views on everything, as he considers 'all things'.Ok, I'm not witty, but I know a good book when I read it!This is it!

5-0 out of 5 stars This edition is perfect!
This edition is perfect!For those who were wondering if they would get a poorlymade book based on the only 1 star review, let me assure you that you will not, I received this book without any mistakes, or missing pages, etc.Its a charming and complete edition.

I see that the release date for this edition is after the date the 1 star review was made.

This book has been well reviewed already, and all I can add is this is a real treat for anyone who loves intelligent argument, wit and written brilliance!

1-0 out of 5 stars Shoddy
All Things Considered

First time I can recall seeing an advertisement masquerading as an "Editorial Review." I cannot abide Kessinger and its mission to re-appropriate books (often mere pamphlets) in the public domain and republish them in shoddy overpriced editions. Wankers. ... Read more


17. Catholic truth in history
by Hilaire Belloc, G K. 1874-1936 Chesterton, James Joseph Walsh
Paperback: 26 Pages (2010-09-05)
list price: US$14.75 -- used & new: US$11.83
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1178429601
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
Hilaire Belloc shows us not only the importance of history, but the importance that the truth of history is truly conveyed rather than a false history as so often can happen when there is an anti-Catholic bias. This is just as true today as when he wrote it. ... Read more


18. St. Francis of Assisi
by G K. 1874-1936 Chesterton
 Paperback: 198 Pages (2010-09-13)
list price: US$23.75 -- used & new: US$16.86
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1171881339
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
This is the story of Francis of Assisi, who inspired a revolution in art that began with Giotto and a revolution in poetry that began with Dante. Here is the Francis who prayed and danced with pagan abandon, who talked to animals, who invented the creche.Amazon.com Review
There are certainly many studies of Saint Francis of Assisi that aninterested reader might find and many of them immensely praiseworthy. Butin reading G.K. Chesterton on Francis, you get two glories for one: first isan enlightening study of this most beloved of Christian saints and secondis Chesterton himself, one of the great Christian writers of the 20thcentury, who converted to Roman Catholicism in 1922 because, it has beensaid, "only the Roman Church could produce a St. Francis of Assisi." Published shortly after his conversion, Chesterton wrote this book in partto reclaim Francis for the church. There are always those who want to claimFrancis for their cause, Chesterton recognized, who also fail to understandthe spiritual and intellectual ground upon which he stands. Chestertonwould return Francis to Christ. As he summarizes, "however wild andromantic his gyrations might appear to many, [Francis] always hung on toreason by one invisible and indestructible hair.... The great saint wassane.... He was not a mere eccentric because he was always turning towardsthe center and heart of the maze; he took the queerest and most zigzagshortcuts through the wood, but he was always going home."

As one editor of Chesterton's puts it, "of St. Francis he might have saidwhat he said about Blake: 'We always feel that he is saying something veryplain and emphatic even when we have not the wildest notion of what itis.'" --Doug Thorpe ... Read more

Customer Reviews (32)

5-0 out of 5 stars Much More than Merely a Biography
This book is written and crafted by a genius. What came in the mail was much more than merely a biography, this is a work of precision cultural criticism and wit which can be both pointed and beautiful at the same time.

I love how Chesterton picks out his contemporaries or past thinkers and then tells us why they are wrong for thinking x. There is so much truth in this book-- I could go on and on about how relevant this work is to us in the 21st Century. When talking about Ancient Rome: "Thus the effect of treating sex as only one innocent natural thing was that every other innocent natural thing became soaked and sodden with sex" (21).

What makes Chesterton so good, though, is that he is not parading merely his own opinion throughout the book-- he is speaking with the fullness of truth backing him up. The reader will experience what happens when Jn 8:32 is applied to literature: "the truth will set you free" and you will then be free to take down that which is not true-- and do it with style.

5-0 out of 5 stars Interesting and unique look at the life of St Francis
A fascinating and unique look at St Francis by one of the greats; rather than simply detailing St Francis' life in biography form, Chesterton takes events from St Francis' life that show his uniqueness, and then weaves theology and Franciscan practice around them. Thu the life and beliefs of this great Saint are explained in ways an "ordinary" biography could not. A wonderful book.

5-0 out of 5 stars The True Spirit of the Man
For quite a long time, even though I should have known better, I've avoided getting to know St. Francis of Assisi, being somewhat repulsed by the saccharine hippie that he is so often made out to be. Happy and carefree to some extent Francis was, but how one reconciles this image with the suffering of the Stigmata, and the fasting and mortification of Mt. Alverno, leaves a lot to be worked out.

But thankfully now in Chesterton, I have encountered St. Francis as he was and is, in all his beautiful paradoxes. I have encountered a man who was what I have always wanted to be: "a poet who lived his life as a poem," a man who felt the Sun his brother, and the Moon his sister, not because of the sweetness and mere prettiness of nature, but because together we owe all our existence and purpose to the grace of God our creator. And so the apparent madness of Francis's almost brutal asceticism, Chesterton explains, is not the senseless behavior of a lunatic, but can only be understood as the complete self-giving of one desperately in love.

It must be said that, as in all great writing, Chesterton's book gives as much insight into Chesterton himself as he does his subject--so alongside the Saint we encounter another man of ranging mind, delicious wit, and perhaps above all, wholehearted sincerity. And in both men we find one worthy of admiration--imitation, even. But in this case, as in only the most transcendent of writing, the way to attain such high company is also illuminated: lively faith and complete trust in God. To imitate the best of Chesterton, as to imitate St. Francis himself, is to imitate Christ and so make a poem of our own lives--to take up the wild and almost desperate call to share in the creative work of a loving God.

This book is not a complete history of Francis's life, nor was it intended to be. But in St. Francis of Assisi, G. K. Chesterton truly captures the spirit of the man, while expressing his own poetic character. Both are refreshing, both are an inspiration. And both, we can pray, might lead us to appreciate God's grace more dearly.

5-0 out of 5 stars Glad to get to know Chesterton
A friend of mine who is a devotee of Chesterton suggested reading this biography of St. Francis as a good way to acquaint myself with his writings. She is correct. This small book is packed full of interesting thoughts about the times and circumstances in which St. Francis lived and how he helped shape the late Middle Ages with his, for the time, novel and often shocking approach to Christian living. Chesterton's insights into the person of St. Francis are excellent. I highly recommend this to anyone who wishes to become comfortable with this fine author's writings.

3-0 out of 5 stars The life of a saint and too much else!
This short volume by Chesterton on the life of St. Francis of Assisi did not satisfy me either as a biography, as a glimpse into his time period or as a devotional read. Chesterton's circuitous style of writing while passable in longer works gets annoying here particularly at moments when he goes off on long tangents. These tangents add something to the narrative, but by the time you arrive at their end you've already forgotten where you began from. The big chunks on the life of St. Francis are well done, quite honest and quite approachable, but the fact that they're interspersed with so much wandering text makes this a difficult book to read. There are better books on the life of St. Francis out there. For instance, although I've never read the English translation, the best Life of St. Francis that I have thus far read is El Hermano de Asís by Ignacio Larrañaga. ... Read more


19. The book of Job
by G K. 1874-1936 Chesterton
Paperback: 158 Pages (2010-08-18)
list price: US$21.75 -- used & new: US$13.72
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1177395673
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words.This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book. ... Read more


20. A shilling for my thoughts: being a selection from the essays, stories, and other writings of
by G K. 1874-1936 Chesterton, E 1868-1938 Lucas
Paperback: 48 Pages (2010-08-13)
list price: US$15.75 -- used & new: US$11.57
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 117720181X
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

  1-20 of 100 | Next 20
A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

Prices listed on this site are subject to change without notice.
Questions on ordering or shipping? click here for help.

site stats