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$9.69
21. The Inferno
$10.68
22. Dante's Divine Comedy: A Graphic
$8.83
23. The Dore Illustrations for Dante's
$27.74
24. The Inferno of Dante; With Text
$3.99
25. The Inferno (Barnes & Noble
26. La Divina Comedia (Spanish Edition)
$9.99
27. The Portable Dante (Penguin Classics)
$7.25
28. The Divine Comedy: Volume 2: Purgatory
$2.98
29. Inferno (Modern Library Classics)
$32.94
30. Dante's Inferno
$4.00
31. Working for the Devil (Dante Valentine,
$14.13
32. The House of Life
 
$3.44
33. Paradiso (Bantam Classics)
$6.69
34. The Divine Comedy, Part 2: Purgatory
$5.23
35. The New Life/La Vita Nuova: A
$8.60
36. Paradise (Modern Library Classics)
$16.49
37. Divine Comedy
$21.37
38. The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri,
$0.95
39. Dante's Stolen Wife (Silhouette
$4.74
40. Dante's Inferno

21. The Inferno
by Dante
Paperback: 736 Pages (2002-01-08)
list price: US$17.00 -- used & new: US$9.69
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0385496982
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
The epic grandeur of Dante’s masterpiece has inspired readers for 700 years, and has entered the human imagination. But the further we move from the late medieval world of Dante, the more a rich understanding and enjoyment of the poem depends on knowledgeable guidance. Robert Hollander, a renowned scholar and master teacher of Dante, and Jean Hollander, an accomplished poet, have written a beautifully accurate and clear verse translation of the first volume of Dante’s epic poem, the Divine Comedy.Featuring the original Italian text opposite the translation, this edition also offers an extensive and accessible introduction and generous commentaries that draw on centuries of scholarship as well as Robert Hollander’s own decades of teaching and research. The Hollander translation is the new standard in English of this essential work of world literature.Amazon.com Review
Translation is always an imperfect art, demanding from its practitioners a level of dual fidelity that even a seasoned bigamist would envy. And nowork of art has prompted more in the way of earnest imperfection thanDante's Divine Comedy. Transforming those intricate, rhyme-richtercets into English has been the despair of many a distinguishedtranslator, from Henry Wadsworth Longfellow to W.S. Merwin (whose estimable rendition ofPurgatorio found the poet rattling over more than one linguisticspeed bump). Now comes a fresh rendition of the Inferno from ahusband-and-wife team. Robert Hollander, who has taught Dante for nearlyfour decades at Princeton, supplies the scholarly muscle, while his wife,poet Jean Hollander, attends to the verbal music.

How does their collaboration stack up? In his introduction, RobertHollander is quick to acknowledge his debt to John D. Sinclair's prose trot of 1939, and to theversion that CharlesSingleton derived largely from his predecessor's in 1970. Yet theHollanders have done us all a favor by throwing Sinclair'sfaux medievalisms overboard. And their predilection for direct,monosyllabic English sometimes brings them much closer to Dante's asperityand rhythmic urgency. One example will suffice. In the last line of CantoV, after listening to Francesca's adulterous aria, the poet faints: "Ecaddi come corpo morto cade." Sinclair's rendering---"I swooned as ifin death and dropped like a dead body"--has a kind of conditional mushinessto it. Compare the punchier rendition from the Hollanders: "And down I fellas a dead body falls." It sounds like an actual line of English verse,which is the least we can do for the supreme poet of our beleagueredcivilization.

Robert Hollander has also supplied an extensive and very welcomecommentary. There are times, perhaps, when he might have broken ranks withhis academic ancestors: why not deviate from Giorgio Petrocchi's 1967edition of the Italian text when he thinks that the great scholar wasbarking up the wrong tree? In any case, the Hollanders' Inferno is afine addition to the burgeoning bookshelf of Dante in English. It won'tdisplace the relatively recent verse translations by Robert Pinsky or AllenMandelbaum, and even John Ciardi's version, which sometimes substitutesbreeziness for accuracy, can probably hold its own here. But when it comesto high fidelity and exegetical generosity, this Inferno burnsbrightly indeed. --James Marcus ... Read more

Customer Reviews (31)

4-0 out of 5 stars Dante's Inferno
My son is interested in reading all 3 of these books, so I ordered them all.Good quality and arrived in a timely fashion.

2-0 out of 5 stars Bad Binding
The binding is really bad. The pages started to fall off soon after I bought the book.

I don't really like the translation. I would recommend Durling's translation.

5-0 out of 5 stars Best available translation and commentary
The Hollander's have produced an translation and commentary on Dante that is thoughtful, poetic, and scholarly without being pedantic or overbearing.

5-0 out of 5 stars If you buy only one translation of the Inferno...
If you buy only one translation of the Inferno, this one should be it.

Of course, if you like Dante, this won't be the only translation that you buy, but you absolutely must buy it. It's a remarkable translation and you certainly won't regret it!

5-0 out of 5 stars I don't know why you'd buy any other edition...
Perhaps needless to say, Dante is very hard to translate into English. His terza rima, his hendecayllabic lines often mislabeled "iambic pentameter," his constant elisions, his fluid syntax--all of these things are relatively easy to accomplish in medieval Italian, but trying to mimic its beauty in American English is like trying to squeeze Walt Whitman into tailored Milanese couture. The Hollanders make no such attempts to stretch American English beyond its limits, instead opting for faith to the meaning of Dante's words and lucid English syntax that actually sounds like contemporary American poetry (if Louise Glück decided to write The Divine Comedy today, this is how it would read). What more could you ask for?

Facing the text of the Hollanders' translation is Dante's Italian, allowing the gorgeousness of his poetry to speak for itself. At the beginning of each canto is an outline giving a thorough summary of the plot, and at the end are wonderfully extensive notes offering Professor Hollander's and his peers' interpretations of the text. Some might prefer to have these notes at the back of the book or in a separate volume, but I happen to think their placement in this translation allows one to flip between the poem and the notes much more easily. I also agree with other reviewers' annoyance that Hollander's notes often tell one to read further elsewhere instead of just explaining what these other sources say, but I suppose there's only so much literary criticism one can fit between two covers. ... Read more


22. Dante's Divine Comedy: A Graphic Adaptation
by Seymour Chwast
Hardcover: 128 Pages (2010-08-31)
list price: US$20.00 -- used & new: US$10.68
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1608190846
Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
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Amazon.com Review
Product Description
The "left-handed designer," Seymour Chwast has been putting his unparalleled take—and influence—on the world of illustration and design for the last half century. In his version of Dante's Divine Comedy, Chwast's first graphic novel, Dante and his guide Virgil don fedoras and wander through noir-ish realms of Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise, finding both the wicked and the wondrous on their way.

Dante Alighieri wrote his epic poem The Divine Comedy from 1308 to 1321 while in exile from his native Florence. In the work's three parts (Inferno, Purgatory, and Paradise), Dante chronicles his travels through the afterlife, cataloging a multitude of sinners and saints—many of them real people to whom Dante tellingly assigned either horrible punishment or indescribable pleasure—and eventually meeting both God and Lucifer face-to-face.

In his adaptation of this skewering satire, Chwast creates a visual fantasia that fascinates on every page: From the multifarious torments of the Inferno to the host of delights in Paradise, his inventive illustrations capture the delirious complexity of this classic of the Western canon.

A Look Inside Dante's Divine Comedy: A Graphic Adaptation
(Click on Images to Enlarge)

Second circle of Hell Sins of the flesh
The three furies Sixth circle of Hell
... Read more

Customer Reviews (27)

3-0 out of 5 stars Clarity without Beauty
This is a very clear graphic art depiction of the barebones of the comedy. For no obvious reason (link of Italians to mobsters? ) Dante and Vergil look vaguely 1930s (Dante in trench coat etc.) and a few other characters suggest that era but most are straightforward.The pictures are clear but lack the artistic impact of Dore. I can imagine that graphic artists with more gift for detail such as Herge or Brunhoff might have done more justice to the horror of hell or the beauty of heaven.
This may be useful as a kind of visual guide to the basics of the text for uninformed students-- I have used it successfully in world history for that purpose -- but Ithink considered simply as graphic art it does not deserve the fulsome praise in the blurbs on the cover.

4-0 out of 5 stars A Whirlwind Tour of Dante's Commedy
I enjoyed every minute of Chwast's take on Dante's Divine Comedy. He managed to adapt and distill a masterpiece without exploiting or dumbing it down.

At 128 pages, this whirlwind tour that takes you through a Canto or two per page. Even so, the drama doesn't feel rushed. In fact, if you're planning on reading the original it would be worthwhile to leave this volume open beside it to keep you grounded in the flow of the narrative.

There were many opportunities for a graphic artist to exploit the imagery. I mean, where else do you read about people swimming in pools of excrement as poop rains down from the sky? Chwast's economic style fairly evoked the imagery without degenerating into crassness. (I can only imagine what would have happened if Crumb tried to do this!)

This was my first encounter with Seymour Chwast's art. It will not be my last.

Disclaimer: A review copy of this book was provided at no cost through LibraryThing's Early Reviewer's program.

4-0 out of 5 stars Graphic Comedìa
Seymour Chwast's graphic novel is a thoroughly enjoyable companion piece to Dante's Comedìa. It's the literary geek's equivalent to action figures, only with delicious irony and style and demanding fewer explanations for one's spouse. Chwast has given us a Divine Comic. [Pre-recorded groans go here.]

[Disclaimer: I received this book as part of the LibraryThing Early Reviewers program.]

2-0 out of 5 stars Slightly fun, but kind of pointless.
I felt like the story wasn't particularly well represented in this book. The whole draw was the art which was good but suffered from a lacking of adequate detail. Kind of felt like a 'Where's Wally' book without the colour, set in a vague pretext of Dante's Divine comedy.

5-0 out of 5 stars I found it fun
I enjoyed Seymour Chwast's graphic novel of the Divine Comedy. It makes no effort to be poetic, it's essentially a "Cliff's Notes" with drawings. But the interpretation of the illustrations and the way that the text is summarized is honestly entertaining. As with many works of literature, one needs an annotation to explain what was happening culturally and politically at the time of writing in order to understand the text, and the Divine Comedy especially so because of the many levels of meaning. However, it's also a good story all on its own and Chwast's graphic novel portrays it in a creative fashion. ... Read more


23. The Dore Illustrations for Dante's Divine Comedy
by Gustave Dore
Paperback: 141 Pages (1976-06-01)
list price: US$14.95 -- used & new: US$8.83
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 048623231X
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
fantastic and grotesque scenes depict the passion and grandeur of one of Dante’s most highly regarded works—from the depths of hell onto the mountain of purgatory and up to the empyrean realms of paradise. Includes plates produced for The Inferno, Purgatory and Paradise. Illustrations accompanied by appropriate lines from the Longfellow translation.
... Read more

Customer Reviews (19)

5-0 out of 5 stars Vultures and spiders and Hell - o my!
Although just a man, the prolific career of Gustove Dore really has some divine inspiration. Perhaps that's one reason the church needed him so much - perhaps something really did reach out and whisper his name and someone listened. (Personally I hope that thing was Cthulhu and the dreams were bad, but that's just me)

As far as this book goes, it is one of the easiest to gain entry into a very exciting world. I like the way the rendering are set to tell the story, too, allowing the reader to walk through some frightening gates and look into some of the terrible things that are described in a language that sometimes does seem heavy (Personal opinion and I don't mean offense by it).

When I look at this, it reminds me of the journey that I took as a young adult while learning about all those names and faces that I didn't know. It also reminds me of everything from people with their bodies buried in the ground to one poor soul writhing as a half spider/half woman appeared on the ground. Dore is that kind of influence and I'm glad that someone granted me entry into this world because, if they hadn't, I would have missed out on so much. So, brielf, I have to say that this is well worth the price of admission and it is well worth obtaining so you can look at the detail and marvel at the tools being utilized.

also, look into the other books. The bible, the mad; Dore was inspired by everything. And that is inspiring, to say the least.

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent
Excellent book. This is a must-have for fans of Dore's work. I'm almost tempted to buy a second copy to frame a few pages.

5-0 out of 5 stars Classic and Classical
The work by Dore is what you think of when you imagine Dante's Divine Comedy.The comments of some should be completely disregarded and the work seen for what it is; Classic work, on Classical themes, done very well.

5-0 out of 5 stars Dore Illustrations
Book arrived in promised condition, and in a timely fashion.I would buy from this seller again.

5-0 out of 5 stars An Excellent book for the Doré or Dante lover
The quality of this book - along with an amazingly affordable price tag - quickly persuaded me to pick up a copy. Its really everything you could ask for in an art book;

The pictures are all very big, but not overwhelming; Its easy to see minute detail, and the overall scope of the image. I actually blew up some of the prints in photoshop and printed them on huge poster paper for my room, while not sacrificing a drop of detail.

Also, I had to put quite a good deal of pressure onto the spine of the book in order to get a good scan from them, and im happy to say that doing so didn't even leave an annoying "bookmark" crease in the book, and the spine didn't even crease. Dover books really did produce a fine quality book, and the note on the back really is true: This book IS permanent.

If you have read or are reading the divine comedy this book is a great reference to glance at every now and again to truly suck you into Dante's epic poem, and bring you to the Heights of Heaven, The Depths of Hell, or the pain of purgatory in a way you could never have imagened.

The woodcuts done here by dore are so elaborate and vivid you could spend a good portion of a day just gazing into the faces of cursed souls writhing in hell, or the beauty of millions of angels soaring in the highest heaven. Dore illustrates every picture so full of movement and depth its the next best thing to a movie. ... Read more


24. The Inferno of Dante; With Text and Translation
by Dante Alighieri
Paperback: 192 Pages (2010-10-14)
list price: US$27.74 -- used & new: US$27.74
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0217089496
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
This is an OCR edition without illustrations or index. It may have numerous typos or missing text. However, purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original rare book from GeneralBooksClub.com. You can also preview excerpts from the book there. Purchasers are also entitled to a free trial membership in the General Books Club where they can select from more than a million books without charge. Original Published by: Merrymount Press in 1920 in 416 pages; Subjects: Fiction / Classics; Poetry / General; Poetry / Continental European; Poetry / Ancient, Classical & Medieval;Amazon.com Review
The one quality that all classic works of literature share is their timelessness. Shakespeare still plays in Peoria 400 years after his death because the stories he dramatized resonate in modern readers' hearts and minds; methods of warfare have changed quite a bit since the Trojan War described by Homer in his Iliad, but the passions and conflicts that shaped such warriors as Achilles, Agamemnon, Patroclus, and Odysseus still find their counterparts today on battlefields from Bosnia to Afghanistan. Likewise, a little travel guide to hell written by the Florentine poet Dante Alighieri in the 13th century remains in print at the end of the 20th century, and it continues to speak to new generations of readers. There have been countless translations of the Inferno, but this one by poet Robert Pinsky is both eloquent and tailored to our times.

Yes, this is an epic poem, but don't let that put you off. An excellent introduction provides context for the work, while detailed notes on each canto are a virtual who's who of 13th-century Italian politics, culture, and literature. Best of all, Pinsky's brilliant translation communicates the horror, despair, and terror of hell with such immediacy, you can almost smell the sulfur and feel the heat from the rain of fire as Dante--led by his faithful guide Virgil--descends lower and lower into the pit. Dante's journey through Satan's kingdom must rate as one of the great fictional travel tales of all time, and Pinsky does it great justice. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (52)

4-0 out of 5 stars Quite rightly highly rated translation!
This came in today; compared with my 1968 edition [ which was minus Italian original verse ] Pinsky does a poetic justice to Dante.

I enjoy comparing James Branch Cabell's Jurgen's view of Hell and Heaven to Dante's. The dogmatic complexities of humor and poetry are almost numbing. In a way Cabell does a credible examination of Dante, he suggests that Hell is made in Jurgen's fathers
mind-something that children are taught at an early age-and the Devil is merely a shadow of God.

I wish Albrecht Dürer's illustrations were part of this volume too.The Inferno of Dante: A New Verse Translation, Bilingual Edition (English and Italian Edition)

5-0 out of 5 stars The darkest thing I have ever read
A guided tour through hell written in the form of a poem? An idea that good only comes once in a thousand years.

2-0 out of 5 stars Brilliant work but I didn't enjoy it
As a literature minor, I know that I'm supposed to take great joy in dissecting and analyzing a great work of literature such as The Inferno, but I didn't really enjoy this book all that much.

I found way too much of the storyline to be repetitive and drawn out for two long. The first half or so of the story is basically traveling from one circle of Hell to another, finding out what the sin and the punishment for the sin in that area is, meeting and talking with one or two of the sinners and relating what they did in their lives to the reason that they are here. Dante reacts to their trials either sympathetically or feeling that they deserve what they got mainly based on who they are (if they happen to be somebody from his actual life who treated him badly or had a hand in his expulsion from his home, he feels pretty justified in thinking that they are getting what they deserve.)

I don't want to take away from the greatness of this piece of literature. The rhyming scheme and the contrapasso (matching up the punishments so that they fit the crime) that Dante has developed are pure genius and the poem itself is a great accomplishment. My rating is based entirely upon my personal enjoyment (or lack there of) of the work.

5-0 out of 5 stars As Good as it Gets...
When I came across Mr. Pinsky's translation over a decade ago, I was thrilled and impressed.I loved sitting with the beautiful prose in Italian and English.When I heard my daughter was taking a course in Italian on Dante's Inferno at Syracuse (ahhh to be in college again), I sent her the book.Both my daughter and her professor love this translation.The professor has used the text in her class before.A great buy in hardcover...even better in paperback.A great enhancement would be a version for my new kindle2!

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent for the Rookie
Perhaps you are reading these reviews because, let us be honest, you are a bit intimidated to read a book of this nature.Written over seven centuries ago, many, perhaps even most, of the references are today obscure.Yes, the scholars can read Dante, but what of you, who just wants something deeper, who recognizes that you should fill your head with something a bit more permanent than the latest best seller?You still want something accessible and understandable.To you I say...you should plunge ahead and read THE INFERNO OF DANTE.It is fantastic.

I am no expert on the time period reflected in THE INFERNO.And I remember nothing about any poetry class I ever took.I cannot even say whether Pinsky did a good job of translating Dante into English.I can only comment on the pages that are in front of me, and they are extremely enjoyable.Dante himself sought to make THE INFERNO accessible to the masses.He wrote it in Italian rather than Latin for exactly that reason and this translation remains true to that end.

As most are aware, THE INFERNO takes us through the circles of Hell, deeper and deeper into the abyss.THE INFERNO's descriptions are excellent, grabbing the reader's attention as the sins become more and more serious the deeper we go, with the eternal punishments meted out becoming more and more severe.Although many references are now obscure, the notes for the book provide an excellent context that allows one to follow along.I personally was concerned that I would be spending too much time with the endnotes to really enjoy the text.But the two really complement each other very well, making the book that much more enjoyable.

We learn a great deal along the way.In limbo, for instance, Dante encounters many souls worthy of salvation, but which are doomed to limbo, as they were born before Christ provided that salvation to man.Interestingly, although most Muslims are later found deeper in hell with the heretics, several notable Muslims are here, evidencing at least a grudging appreciation on the part of the deeply Chritian Dante for the damned of a non-Christian religion.

Following that same theme, the founder of Islam himself, Mohammed, is further down still than the heretics.Following the belief that Mohammed was a fallen Catholic cardinal, he is with the schismatics, who broke from the one true church to lead others onto a false path.Eternally split open from head to tailbone only to heal up for another round of the same, his torture perfectly symbolizes his sin.

Of course, I use the above merely as examples.THE INFERNO is rife with others, each as readable as they are gruesome.Contrary to my own initial concerns, I found THE INFERNO OF DANTE very much worth the time and I recommend it without hesitation. ... Read more


25. The Inferno (Barnes & Noble Classics)
by Dante Alighieri
Hardcover: 352 Pages (2005-01-06)
list price: US$7.95 -- used & new: US$3.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1593083319
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description

The Inferno, by Dante Alighieri, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics:
New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars Biographies of the authors Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events Footnotes and endnotes Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work Comments by other famous authors Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations Bibliographies for further reading Indices & Glossaries, when appropriateAll editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works.
 
The Inferno remains literature’s most hallowed and graphic vision of Hell. Dante plunges readers into this unforgettable world with a deceptively simple—and now legendary—tercet:

Midway upon the journey of our life
I found myself within a forest dark
For the straightforward pathway had been lost.

With these words, Dante plunges readers into the unforgettable world of the Inferno—one of the most graphic visions of Hell ever created. In this first part of the epic The Divine Comedy, Dante is led by the poet Virgil down into the nine circles of Hell, where he travels through nightmare landscapes of fetid cesspools, viper pits, frozen lakes, and boiling rivers of blood and witnesses sinners being beaten, burned, eaten, defecated upon, and torn to pieces by demons. Along the way he meets the most fascinating characters known to the classical and medieval world—the silver-tongued Ulysses, lustful Francesca da Rimini, the heretical Farinata degli Uberti, and scores of other intriguing and notorious figures.

This edition of the Inferno revives the famous Henry Wadsworth Longfellow translation, which first introduced Dante’s literary genius to a broad American audience. “Opening the book we stand face to face with the poet,” wrote William Dean Howells of Longfellow’s Dante, “and when his voice ceases we may marvel if he has not sung to us in his own Tuscan.” Lyrically graceful and brimming with startlingly vivid images, Dante’s Inferno is a perpetually engrossing classic that ranks with the greatest works of Homer and Shakespeare.

Features a map of Hell and illustrations by Gustave Doré.
 
Peter Bondanella is Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature and Italian at Indiana University and a past president of the American Association for Italian Studies. His publications include a number of translations of Italian classics, books on Italian Renaissance literature and Italian cinema, and a dictionary of Italian literature.

... Read more

Customer Reviews (6)

5-0 out of 5 stars Exactly what I was looking for:
I wanted a copy of Dante's Inferno with the original Longfellow translation - and here it is! The translation is smooth, the book is great and it even has footnotes and endnotes to help understand some of the historical/theological/mythical background. Great book!

5-0 out of 5 stars Divinely nasty
"Midway life's journey I was made aware/that I had strayed into a dark forest..." Those eerie words open the first cantica of Dante Alighieri's "Inferno," the most famous part of the legendary Divina Comedia. But the stuff going on here is anything but divine, as Dante explores the metaphorical and supernatural horrors of the inferno.

The date is Good Friday of the year 1300, and Dante is lost in a creepy dark forest, being assaulted by a trio of beasts who symbolize his own sins. But suddenly he is rescued ("Not man; man I once was") by the legendary poet Virgil, who takes the despondent Dante under his wing -- and down into Hell.

But this isn't a straightforward hell of flames and dancing devils. Instead, it's a multi-tiered carnival of horrors, where different sins are punished with different means. Opportunists are forever stung by insects, the lustful are trapped in a storm, the greedy are forced to battle against each other, and the violent lie in a river of boiling blood, are transformed into thorn bushes, and are trapped on a volcanic desert.

If nothing else makes you feel like being good, then "The Inferno" might change your mind. The author loads up his "Inferno" with every kind of disgusting, grotesque punishment that you can imagine -- and it's all wrapped up in an allegorical journey of humankind's redemption, not to mention dissing the politics of Italy and Florence.

Along with Virgil -- author of the "Aeneid" -- Dante peppered his Inferno with Greek myth and symbolism. Like the Greek underworld, different punishments await different sins; what's more, there are also appearances by harpies, centaurs, Cerberus and the god Pluto. But the sinners are mostly Dante's contemporaries, from corrupt popes to soldiers.

And Dante's skill as a writer can't be denied -- the grotesque punishments are enough to make your skin crawl ("Fixed in the slime, groan they, 'We were sullen and wroth...'"), and the grand finale is Satan himself, with legendary traitors Brutus, Cassius and Judas sitting in his mouths. (Yes, I said MOUTHS, not "mouth")

More impressive still is his ability to weave the poetry out of symbolism and allegory, without it ever seeming preachy or annoying. Even pre-hell, we have a lion, a leopard and a wolf, which symbolize different sins, and a dark forest that indicates suicidal thoughts. And the punishments themselves usually reflect the person's flaws, such as false prophets having their heads twisted around so they can only see what's behind them. Wicked sense of humor.

Dante's vivid writing and wildly imaginative "inferno" makes this the most fascinating, compelling volume of the Divine Comedy. Never fun, but always spellbinding and complicated.

4-0 out of 5 stars Great Hardcover of a Classic
There's not much to say. It's a great hardcover edition of a must-read for just about everyone out there.

It would be nice to have a single hardcover edition of the entire trilogy, but this will suffice and is definitely the only true "must-read" of the trio.

4-0 out of 5 stars Sets the bar high for future B&N Classics
I ended up reading this book twice. The first time, I read straight through the poem and was thoroughly unimpressed. The story, as Longfellow himself says, is "tedious" and self-congratulatory and mostly a platform for attacking his enemies. It isn't really great reading.

So what made me read it a second time? This time, Barnes & Noble seems to have found the right person to write the introduction and put together endnotes and discussion notes. The second time through, I read the poem along with each endnote, and my appreciation of the book was dramatically better.

Without the background as presented in the introduction and endnotes, the story is hobbled from the outset. You simply can't understand the story and what Dante is trying to say without a clear understanding of the history and circumstances in which he wrote it. Who are these people in Hell? Why is Hell shaped the way it is? What is the meaning of each character in Hell? The endnotes answer all these questions, and make the story interesting.

The follow-on discussion notes pose an interesting question. Can a reader read and enjoy The Inferno as a book and story, rather than as "literature"? The answer, based on the story alone is a resounding no. However, this edition by Barnes & Noble Classics turns that right around and proves that with the right supporting material, even a "tedious" book like this can be made enjoyable.

5 stars for the excellent B&N addition, but -1 for the story itself.

5-0 out of 5 stars The best version of Inferno for the money
As I would never attempt to actually review Dante's Inferno, I am only going to review this version in comparison to others.

Of all of the different translations, the translation by Longfellow (which this is) seems to be more accessible then the tedious Mandelbaum version. That's not to say that it in any way dumbed down, it is simply more readable then the other translations that I have sat down in front of.

The illustrations by Gustave Dore are the standard and should never be replaced by anything else.This book has large illustrations of all of his original work seamlessly wrapped around a very readable font.

The preface, footnotes, and endnotes are plentiful and easily flipped to when needed.

The Inferno is a standard for any home good library, and this is an excellent hardcover copy to have for the price. ... Read more


26. La Divina Comedia (Spanish Edition) ILLUSTRATED (mobi)
by Dante Alighieri
Kindle Edition: Pages (2009-05-10)
list price: US$0.99
Asin: B002CCNBAU
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Customer Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Timely and priceless
Yo lei este libro en la edicion Hachette.El libro fue separado en partes y un parte fue publicado cada dos semanas.En aquel tiempo yo no tenia para comprar el libro completo, mas esperaba anhelosamente por cada parte a llegar al kiosko.Valia el precio de un almuerzo de disfrutar de la grandeza y imaginacion de Dante.

Este fue en 1966, y todavia tengo estas revistas guardadas con cuidado y carino.No puedo expresar en palabaras lo que significa poder alcanzar este clasico en todo lugar y en todo momento por el Kindle.Disculpame mis errors in escribir, el libro no necesita disculpos. ... Read more


27. The Portable Dante (Penguin Classics)
by Dante Alighieri
Paperback: 704 Pages (2003-07-29)
list price: US$18.00 -- used & new: US$9.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0142437549
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
Dante Alighieri paved the way for modern literature, while creating verse and prose that remain unparalleled for formal elegance, intellectual depth, and emotional grandeur. The Portable Dante contains complete verse translations of Dante's two masterworks, The Divine Comedy and La Vita Nuova, as well as a bibliography, notes, and an introduction by eminent scholar and translator Mark Musa.

Translated and edited by Mark Musa. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (18)

5-0 out of 5 stars Fabulous Read
This book was for a class, but I loved reading it.In excellent condition and arrived on time.

4-0 out of 5 stars dante's lover
the book was almost new, as defined. It came in a timely manner and it had only one page written . I was very happy.

4-0 out of 5 stars Just as promised
Book in good shape and is just as described. I had ordered from another place at the same time and this one showed up days before the other one. Thank you for the good service/experience.

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent translation, but some drawbacks to this edition
First, a word about Mark Musa's translation of Dante's works. His interpretations of the Divine Comedy and La Vita Nuova are very beautiful, extremely readable, and as true to Dante as you can be in English. Musa's scholarship is excellent, and his introductory essays on Dante and his works are a pleasure to read, offering a broad understanding of what Dante is all about.

However, it is important that you keep in mind that a number of concessions had to be made for this book. Collecting the massive poems of the Divine Comedy, along with La Vita Nuova, is no mean task - I'm astounded Penguin Classics pulled it off in such a compact and readable volume. But this collection comes at the expense of some features that range from minor to outright baffling.

First, the minor stuff. This edition lacks the informative diagrams and illustrations of the standalone Divine Comedy volumes from Penguin Classics (Inferno, et al). Given the complexity of Dante's creation, it is very helpful to have maps to show you where the various parts of the afterlife are, and who inhabits them. Puzzlingly, /The Portable Dante/ includes a detailed map of Purgatory, but only a very vague and un-labeled map of Inferno, and NO map of Paradiso and the celestial spheres. Very strange and disappointing.

More unfortunate is the lack of a glossary. The Penguin Classics /Inferno/ has an excellent glossary of people and places that appear in the poem. This is a phenomenal resource for figuring out who is where in Hell, what they represent, and what Dante is doing with them.

However, the most (potentially) major issue with this volume is the sparse commentary. The individual books of The Divine Comedy have extensive endnotes, detailing broad sections and individual passages in great detail. The notes offer a better understanding of what Dante is doing, because virtually every line of poetry includes multi-faceted references to classical mythology, Christian scripture, and contemporary or historical Italian culture. For the majority of the Divine Comedy, well over 50% of the notes (as compared with the individual Penguin Classics books) have been removed.

The endnotes have been converted to non-intrusive footnotes, which is a welcome shift. But I can't help but feel that also including a detailed endnotes section would have added much, so that at the very least the reader could explore the more obscure references (passages from the Aeneid, the Bible, and so on) if they so desire. I also noticed some notes rather crucial to understanding have been removed completely, which is very unfortunate.

So how come, after all this whining and moaning, I still give /The Portable Dante/ a full five stars? Because Mark Musa's translation is so fluid and vital, and having such a beautiful collection in a compact volume is extremely valuable. There is enough supplementary material that casual readers can enjoy Dante's mastery and creativity, and they will perhaps be tantalized to explore the deeper meanings he plants throughout.

Here's the bottom line: /The Portable Dante/ is what I use when I wish to read Dante to others, or to simply read through for my own enjoyment. If you need extensive scholarly information, I recommend also buying the Penguin Classics editions of the individual parts of The Divine Comedy. But as a smooth and very readable base camp for your exploration of Dante, I can think of no better book than this.

Highly recommended, whatever your level of interest in this fascinating poet and his works.

4-0 out of 5 stars Good basic text
good translation - not excellent, but good, and the footnotes are helpful. The translator also makes an attempt at explaining the contrapasso for each Canto of Inferno, which can be helpful to the independant reader. ... Read more


28. The Divine Comedy: Volume 2: Purgatory
by Dante Alighieri
Paperback: 399 Pages (1985-02-05)
list price: US$13.00 -- used & new: US$7.25
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0140444424
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

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Beginning with Dante's liberation from Hell, "Purgatory" relates his ascent, accompanied by Virgil, to the Mount of Purgatory - a mountain of nine levels, formed from rock forced upwards when God threw Satan into depths of the earth. As he travels through the first seven levels, Dante observes the sinners who are waiting for their release into Paradise, and through these encounters he is himself transformed into a stronger and better man. For, it is only when he has learned from each of these levels that he can ascend to the gateway to Heaven: the Garden of Eden. The second part of one of the greatest epic poems, "Purgatory" is an enthralling Christian allegory of sin, redemption and ultimate enlightenment. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (11)

5-0 out of 5 stars Purgation of Dante
I'd completed the first book of The Divine Comedy and had to pick up the second and third. This volume takes place in Catholic Purgatory and opens up with Dante escaping from Hell and making his way across the waters to the mountain of Purgatory. It follows Dante as he makes his way up the mountain encountering more souls who are paying the price for their sins in their now-lost lives. Dante will in essence share in these tribulations to purify himself so that he can enter Paradise.

5-0 out of 5 stars Medieval vision of the afterlife
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.Norton edition has great articles to help explain the work and is a great translation.The other great translation is by Mark Musa."The Divine Comedy" describes Dante's journey through Hell (Inferno), Purgatory (Purgatorio), and Paradise (Paradiso), guided first by the Roman epic poet Virgil and then by Beatrice, the subject of his love and another of his works, "La Vita Nuova." While the vision of Hell, the Inferno, is vivid for modern readers, the theological niceties presented in the other books require a certain amount of patience and scholarship to understand.Purgatorio, the most lyrical and human of the three, also has the most poets in it; Paradiso, the most heavily theological, has the most beautiful and ecstatic mystic passages in which Dante tries to describe what he confesses he is unable to convey (e.g., when Dante looks into the face of God: "all'alta fantasia qui mancò possa" - "at this high moment, ability failed my capacity to describe," Paradiso, XXXIII, 142).

Dante wrote the Comedy in his regional dialect.By creating a poem of epic structure and philosophic purpose, he established that the Italian language was suitable for the highest sort of expression, and simultaneously established the Tuscan dialect as the standard for Italian. In French, Italian is nicknamed la langue de Dante.Publishing in the vernacular language marked Dante as one of the first (among others such as Geoffrey Chaucer and Giovanni Boccaccio) to break from standards of publishing in only Latin or Greek (the languages of Church and antiquity).This break allowed more literature to be published for a wider audience - setting the stage for greater levels of literacy in the future.

Readers often cannot understand how such a serious work may be called a "comedy".In Dante's time, all serious scholarly works were written in Latin (a tradition that would persist for several hundred years more, until the waning years of the Enlightenment) and works written in any other language were assumed to be comedic in nature.Furthermore, the word "comedy," in the classical sense, refers to works which reflect belief in an ordered universe, in which events not only tended towards a happy or "amusing" ending, but an ending influenced by a Providential will that orders all things to an ultimate good.By this meaning of the word, the progression of Dante's pilgrim from Hell to Paradise is the paradigmatic expression of comedy, since the work begins with the pilgrim's moral confusion and ends with the vision of God.

The Divine Comedy can be described simply as an allegory: Each canto, and the episodes therein, can contain many alternate meanings.Dante's allegory, however, is more complex, and, in explaining how to read the poem (see the "Letter to Can Grande della Scala"), he outlines other levels of meaning besides the allegory (the historical, the moral, the literal, and the anagogical).The structure of the poem, likewise, is quite complex, with mathematical and numerological patterns arching throughout the work, particularly threes and nines.The poem is often lauded for its particularly human qualities: Dante's skillful delineation of the characters he encounters in Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise; his bitter denunciations of Florentine and Italian politics; and his powerful poetic imagination.Dante's use of real characters, according to Dorothy Sayers in her introduction to her translation of "L'Inferno", allows Dante the freedom of not having to involve the reader in description, and allows him to "[make] room in his poem for the discussion of a great many subjects of the utmost importance, thus widening its range and increasing its variety."

Dante called the poem "Comedy" (the adjective "Divine" added later in the 16th century) because poems in the ancient world were classified as High ("Tragedy") or Low ("Comedy"). Low poems had happy endings and were of everyday or vulgar subjects, while High poems were for more serious matters. Dante was one of the first in the Middle Ages to write of a serious subject, the Redemption of man, in the low and vulgar Italian language and not the Latin language as one might expect for such a serious topic.

Paradiso
After an initial ascension (Canto I), Beatrice guides Dante through the nine spheres of Heaven. These are concentric and spherical, similar to Aristotelian and Ptolemaic cosmology.Dante admits that the vision of heaven he receives is the one that his human eyes permit him to see. Thus, the vision of heaven found in the Cantos is Dante's own personal vision, ambiguous in its true construction.The addition of a moral dimension means that a soul that has reached Paradise stops at the level applicable to it.Souls are allotted to the point of heaven that fits with their human ability to love God.Thus, there is a heavenly hierarchy. All parts of heaven are accessible to the heavenly soul.That is to say all experience God but there is a hierarchy in the sense that some souls are more spiritually developed than others.This is not determined by time or learning as such but by their proximity to God (how much they allow themselves to experience him above other things).It must be remembered in Dante's schema that all souls in Heaven are on some level always in contact with God.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.

5-0 out of 5 stars A stint in Purgatorio
"And I shall sing about that second realm/where man's soul goes to purify itself/and become worthy to ascend to heaven..."

Having finished his tour of hell and its residents, Dante Alighieri turns his attention to a more cheerful (if less juicy) supernatural realm. "Purgatorio" is less famous than its predecessor, but it's still a beautiful piece of work that explores the mindset not of the damned, but of sinners who are undergoing a divine cleansing -- beautiful, hopeful and a little sad.

Outside of Hell, Dante and Virgil encounter a small boat piloted by an angel and filled with human souls -- and unlike the damned, they're eager to find "the mountain." And as Hell had circles of damnation, Purgatory has terraces that the redeemable souls climb on their way towards Heaven, and none of the people there will leave their terrace until they are cleansed.

And the sins that are cleansed here are the seven deadly ones: the proud, the envious, the wrathful, the greedy, the lazy, the gluttonous, and the lustful. But as Dante moves slowly through the terraces, he finds himself gaining a new tour guide as he approaches Heaven...

I'll say this openly: the second part of the "Divine Comedy" is simply not as deliciously entertaining as "Inferno" -- it was kind of fun to see Dante skewering the corrupt people of his time, and describing the sort of grotesque punishments they merited. But while not as fun, "Purgatorio" is a more transcendent, hopeful kind of story since all the souls there will eventually be cleansed and make their way to Heaven.

As a result, "Purgatorio" is filled with a kind of eager anticipation -- there's flowers, stars, dancing, angelic ferrymen, mythic Grecian rivers and an army of souls who are all-too-eager to get to Purgatory so their purification can start. Alighieri's timeless poetry has a silken quality, from beginning to end ("Here let death's poetry arise to life!/O Muses sacrosanct whose liege I am/and let Calliope rise up and play") and it's crammed with classical references and Christian symbolism (the Sun's part in advancing the soiled souls).

And the trip through Purgatory seems to have a strong effect on Dante's self-insert, who appears less repulsed and more fascinated by what he sees there. It's hard not to feel sorry for him when the paternal Virgil exits the Comedy, but at least he has someone else appears to guide him.

The middle part of the Divine Comedy isn't as juicy as "Inferno," but the beauty of Dante Alighieri's writing makes up for it."Purgatorio" is a must read... and then on to Paradise.

5-0 out of 5 stars The notes illuminate Dante's message.
This translation is a "must" for anyone who thought they couldn't comprehend the Divine Comedy.I recommend purchasing the 3 volume set.

5-0 out of 5 stars Dante Musa Style
Mark Musa has produced an extremely readable translation of a text that at times can be next to inaccessible.As a non-Dante scholar, I have struggled with other translations.The notes accompanying each canto also are well done:thorough and very illuminating.Musa's deft pen has turned Purgatory into a pleasure. ... Read more


29. Inferno (Modern Library Classics)
by Dante
Mass Market Paperback: 560 Pages (2005-10-25)
list price: US$5.95 -- used & new: US$2.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 034548357X
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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Customer Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars Phenomenal book, phenomenal translation!
This is the best translation of a great book that I have seen in a long time.

2-0 out of 5 stars Dante for Bigots??
Esolen is neither a Dante scholar nor an Italian language/literature specialist.He is an English Teacher at Providence College, a Catholic institution. His retelling of the Divine Comedy is reasonably accurate and quite readable.The problem comes with his notes.They range from the scandalously inadequate to the downright offensive.Esolen has written a number of anti-gay articles forreligious publications . This is reflected in his notes where he refers to homosexuality as something like "that most heinous of sins".This is not only offensive in a contemporary publication, but is totally out of tune with Dante himself, who took a much more sympathetic and nuanced approach c.1300 AD.And there are other personal and inappropriate comments.

There are many superior translations out there.Mandelbaum's is excellent and has very good notes.Robert and Jean Hollander's is also very fine and the notes are the most extensive and scholarly of all.

5-0 out of 5 stars The one to get
Aside from the excellent translation, Esolen's profound introductory essay and textual notes fully justify adopting this as one's preferred version of the glorious Divine Comedy in English. Enjoy.

"To read Dante is a duty;
To read him again is a need;
To relish him a sign of greatness."

-N. Tommaseo ... Read more


30. Dante's Inferno
by Marcus Sanders, Doug Harvey
Paperback: 218 Pages (2004-04)
list price: US$22.95 -- used & new: US$32.94
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0811842134
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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A faithful yet totally original contemporary spin on a classic, Dante's Inferno as interpreted by acclaimed artist Sandow Birk and writer Marcus Sanders is a journey through a Hell that bears an eerie semblance to our own world. Birk, hailed by the Los Angeles Times as one of "realism's edgier, more visionary painters," offers extraordinarily nuanced and vivid illustrations inspired by Gustave Dore's famous engravings. This modern interpretation depicts an infernal landscape infested with mini-malls, fast food restaurants, ATMs, and other urban fixtures, and a text that cleverly incorporates urban slang and references to modern events and people (as Dante did in his own time). Previously published in a deluxe, fine-press edition to wide praise, and accompanied by national exhibitions, this striking paperback edition of Dante's Inferno is a genuinely provocative and insightful adaptation for a new generation of readers. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (20)

4-0 out of 5 stars Californian English, enduring lessons, a thoughtful entry to hell and back
As a native Angeleno, reading about my hometown depicted as hell the week the temperature in my neighborhood hit 118 (the municipal thermometer broke at 113 downtown) made for some poetic justice. The tag of the gang that dominated my neighborhood graces a wall in one of the many illustrations that recall Dore as well as graphic art that Birk's known for, as in his witty SF vs. LA "war"-- it figures SF gets to be Purgatorio by comparison.

I have ten translations of the Inferno, and I like to compare their opening lines to judge the fidelity or flexibility of each version. "About halfway through the course of my pathetic life,/ I woke up and found myself in a stupor in some dark place./ I'm not sure how I ended up there; I guess I had taken a few wrong turns." This shows the casual prose and the matter-of-fact reporting that characterizes the mood of Dante's quest.

Sandow Birk and Marcus Sanders offer a surfer's translation, and while this may feel as dated as, say, the Beats' hip slang in a half century from now if not sooner, it does ring true as the vernacular I hear around me now. The placement of such as Slobodan Milosevic, Jim Bakker (misspelled in the text), and Anna Nicole Smith, as well as Porta Potties, Duraflames, and Fred Flintstone's inflated figure in the subway may lead to puzzled readers soon enough, but for now, pop culture references may hook an audience on the original, many translations graced by excellent renderings often side-by-side with the Italian.

The most harrowing scene for me has always been Canto XXXIII, Count Ugolino having to eat his sons. The simple plaint: "'Why don't you help me, Dad?' were his very last words" combines contemporary tone and eloquent power.
The liberties taken with the text, as with the illustrations, naturally are the reason this version's published, so the carping with the freedoms by some reviewers appears beside the point. Birk and Sanders love their wretched city, show compassion for those trapped here, and give voice to the outraged and the outrages in 1300 or 2000.

Many sections rely on digression to incorporate recent references, and then cut medieval ones, and the summaries before each canto do compress a lot, making likely any reader having to go back to a more comprehensive edition for footnotes and commentary. Brother Michael Meister's accessible introduction does assist us, however, and the illustrated map of Hell is clearly drawn. While this may not be the end of one's Dantean adventure, it may be for some readers put off by more scholarly or fussy texts an ideal enticement to descend into classic terror and enduringly moral, and very Christian and ethical, drama.

5-0 out of 5 stars Simply recast into understandable modern language
Oddly enough, I found a copy of this version of Dante's Inferno while waiting for a visit at the jail.It was wildly out of place among old children's books and slightly out of date newspapers.It grabbed me right away by making the tale understandable as it was being read without having to look up endless references.Being recast in modern English and infusing the characters with modern personalities made it more like reading a whomping good adventure.The retelling returns the reader to a very real-time understanding of what is going on, all while retaining Dante's story and tone (he wrote in the Italian vernacular, so the tone is very close to the original.)I know I will return and re-read it multiple times.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Hell of a Great Book
Full disclosure: I am not a scholar of Dante, nor of medieval Italian literature, so I will leave the cavils about Birk's adaptation to the die-hard Dante lovers among us.

What Birk has done is present an "Inferno" (not THE "Inferno," but AN "Inferno") that leaps to brilliant, vivid relevance right now, with illustrations straight out of every portrait of American urban decay you've ever seen or lived through.Hell, Birk is saying, is here and now; it is of you and among you and around you.Find your circle.

Dante's text was written in "low-class" vernacular Italian; this text is written in very vernacular English, and the honesty and familiarity makes the words and ideas immediately relevant; it makes the Inferno a living text.To insert modern figures such as Pol Pot or Bill Clinton or the Bushes (both of them) into the various circles of Hell creates an even more vivid sense of relevance and immediacy.Birk's illustrations and adaptation take off the "old-time goggles," those distorting lenses through which we too often see texts from other centuries and make the Inferno as much a part of this present instant as of the Middle Ages.

What's more, it's gripping.I care about this Dante -- enough so that I'm truly excited about the prospect of rediscovering the original text I slogged through portions of in Humanities 250A in college.I know I won't see Jim Baker or Charles Manson there, but I'll be on familiar territory nevertheless.

5-0 out of 5 stars Readable, Reliable, Riveting
Most translations of Dante sound like they're stuttering through the poem rather than rendering it into understandable English. But this one's different. It's readable. I mean the guy wrote it so it sounds like your neighbor talking, clear as a bell, no antiquated language. It's as easy to understand as the "No Fear Shakespeare" translations. Plus it adds some contemporary references to make up for all those old-fashioned outdated allusions Dante stuffed into the Divine Comedy. I'm a Dante aficionado and have read almost every translation and also some of the original Italian, and, in my opinion, this is the best English translation. Not that I don't love the John Ciardi translation (I do; it's terrific.), but this one tops them all for clarity. You won't be disappointed. Remember, Dante wrote in the vernacular so people of his day could understand him. He wouldhave approved of this.

3-0 out of 5 stars It's not the original, but it still works on some level.
I remember reading "Inferno" for the first time. I was avidly turning pages and I continued through into the heavens (which it got a little dull after purgatory). Inferno is a great book, and I would recommend it highly.

With this adaptation, I have to admit, I was smitten with the cynical artwork of this book and it's move into modern life. The actual writing was a little harder to swallow. It's kind of like someone took a really amazing story and decided to do a remake that didn't quite hit the mark. The original in this case was much better, but the artwork of this new version helps it sing (so to speak). If it had stood alone, it might have appealed to a couple of college kids looking for an alternative to "Cliff Notes", but not to many others.

The depressing landscapes and the illustrations of the modern damned helped pull it together. I was a little disappointed with the language (not that I'm so offended there is "foul" language, just that Dante's journey wasn't supposed to be akin to Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure...)

Not bad, but I'd recommend it mostly for the artwork. ... Read more


31. Working for the Devil (Dante Valentine, Book 1)
by Lilith Saintcrow
Mass Market Paperback: 384 Pages (2007-09-01)
list price: US$7.99 -- used & new: US$4.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0316003131
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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When the Devil needs a rogue demon killed, who does he call?

The Player: Necromance-for-hire Dante Valentine is choosy about her jobs. Hot tempered and with nerves of steel, she can raise the dead like nobody's business. But one rainy Monday morning, everything goes straight to hell.

The Score: The Devil hires Dante to eliminate a rogue demon: Vardimal Santino. In return, he will let her live. It's an offer she can't refuse.

The Catch: How do you kill something that can't die? ... Read more

Customer Reviews (110)

4-0 out of 5 stars fun and original
I really enjoyed this book, Dante Valentine is a fun and appealing heroine, a mix of wry humor and toughness.The plot--a necromance called in to work for the Devil--is a really unique and interesting idea.That said, the pacing felt a bit off to me, with too many repetative fights and the romance angle could have been developed more.But I really did enjoy it, still a great addition to any urban fantasy/paranormal collection.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Paranormal Raymond Chandler?
Working for the Devil is one of those books that you stay up late reading until your eyes are bleary...and then once you're done, you read it again.I loved the entire Dante Valentine series, and Working for the Devil was one of the best of the five books. If you crossed Steven Brust's Vlad the assassian novels and Raymond Chandler's hard-boiled dectective stories, you would get Dante Valentine.Saintcrow has created a detailed alternate version of our world set in the not-too-distant future where supernatural beings have come out of the closet and a minority of humans (who face fear and discrimination) have paranomal abilities.In this world, Necromancers talk to the dead, Sedayeen have healing gifts, Magi control demons, Shamans perform vodoo, and skinlin manipulate the genetic qualities of plants. Unlike many authors, the world Saintcrow created is completely convincing and engrossing. Even the slang terms the characters use feel natural...airborne skateboards that sk8ers ride are "slicboards" and Necromancers are "deadheads".

Dante is a tough-as-nails Necromancer and bounty hunter who hides her vulnerability under a veneer of cynicism and bravado. Her personal history of abuse has left her damaged, but in spite of (or because of) this she is one of the most accomplished paranormals of her generation. After being dragged to Hell for an audience with the Devil, Dante is hired to locate and kill a rogue demon...who happens to have killed one of Dante's former lovers.(The pay is good, but the health insurance is terrible...)She is paired with an enigmatic demon named Japhrimel, who becomes her familiar, friend, and ultimately her lover after he "Falls" from Hell to save her.Together with two paranormal friends and an ex-lover who had abandoned her several years earlier, Dante discovers that the rogue demon is plotting to take control of both Hell and earth through a genetic experiment intended to create a replacement for the Devil himself.

The book is full of Machiavellian twists and turns, so the summary above doesn't really do the plot justice.The characters are well-written and engagingly flawed, although as other reviewers have pointed out, sometimes you just want to shake Dante!I appreciated the fact that Saintcrow doesn't over-explain everything, and since the book is written from Dante's point of view, it leaves space for you to draw your own conclusions about the other character's motivations and feelings. The fight scenes are fast-paced and realistic, and you definitely do not see the end coming. Highly recommended.

5-0 out of 5 stars Who'd have thought?
Just picked this book up in my endless searches for good reads.I thought I exhausted the really "good" series and was caught up in a waiting game for my favorite authors' next novels.In a bio I read of one my fav authors, I saw her mention Lilith Saintcrow.With nothing else to read I finally just bought the whole series.WOW!!This book completely held me captive from the first page.How it took me so long to find this gem is beyond me!Maybe it was her cheesy obviously contrived pen name, or the cover but it gave me hope that there are other phenomenal series out there I just haven't discovered yet.I'm not a big fan of romance novels and I get tricked into buying books that look like they'll be strong paranormal story lines with a TOUCH of romance when in fact they're basically the epitome of "chick flicks"/Harlequin romance novels usually with some obnoxiously emotionally damaged super guy who no one can beat falling for the girl in the most predictable and boring way.While these premises (this book included) have a definite niche, it's the books that are so hyper focused on this type of relationship that gets old after the first chapter.This book actually has STORY and situations where the romance compliments the story rather than becomes the story.I loved it.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Devil has it!
I am already familiar with Saintscrow's Kismet series, so I wasn't sure what to expect here. Would it be too similar? Would it be too much a departure from what Ms. Saintcrow does best? Well, bottom line- this is a GREAT beginning to a series.

I have to say I am VERY impressed with Ms. Saintcrow. First one totally absorbing universe- and now TWO?! Working for the Devil introduces us to an alternative future where technology and magic meld into an uneasy balance. This version of reality is really fascinating. This is far more tech-heavy than Kismet, more character driven, a little less gritty, though probably no less graphic. There might be a hint more romance here- certainly more relationship tension, but it works well to heighten the experience and raise the stakes.

I was immediately sucked in and really, really didn't want to come up for air. I love Jill Kismet... and now I love Dante Valentine. The story was pretty well constructed for a series opener, the characters impressively vivid, the action was true Saintcrow style- fast, vicious and dirty. The pacing was consistent and insistent. Our heroine is strong and imperfect and the kind of girl you would want to have a beer with. All the characters here are- even the ones you aren't totally sure are on your side.

I'm so glad this was only the beginning- and that I took the deep breath I needed to try this series. Hats off to Lillith Saintcrow and happy reading.

4-0 out of 5 stars Entertaining
We read a lot in my house so I tend to buy stuff we'll all enjoy. Lilith Saintcrow's Working for the Devil is one of them we all seemed to agree that we liked. The characters are very developed. The setting is vivid. We love the demon character. The storyline is good. I think I'll be getting the rest of the series, though I'm debating between paperback and kindle because we got this one in paperback. You just can't go wrong with demons and necromancers. ... Read more


32. The House of Life
by Dante Gabriel Rossetti
Paperback: 42 Pages (2010-07-24)
list price: US$14.14 -- used & new: US$14.13
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Asin: 1153706504
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The book has no illustrations or index. Purchasers are entitled to a free trial membership in the General Books Club where they can select from more than a million books without charge. Subjects: Literary Criticism / European / English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh; Literary Criticism / Poetry; Poetry / General; Poetry / American / General; Poetry / English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh; Poetry / Ancient, Classical ... Read more


33. Paradiso (Bantam Classics)
by Dante Alighieri
 Mass Market Paperback: 464 Pages (1986-01-01)
list price: US$6.95 -- used & new: US$3.44
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Asin: 0553212044
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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This brilliant new verse translation by Allen Mandelbaum captures the consummate beauty of the third and last part of Dante's Divine Comedy. The Paradiso is a luminous poem of love and light, of optics, angelology, polemics, prayer, prophecy, and transcendent experience. As Dante ascends to the Celestial Rose, in the tenth and final heaven, all the spectacle and splendor of a great poet's vision now becomes accessible to the modern reader in this highly acclaimed, superb dual language edition. With extensive notes and commentary. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (7)

5-0 out of 5 stars A stint in Purgatorio
"To course across more kindly waters now/my talent's little vessel lifts her sails/leaving behind herself a sea so cruel..."

Having finished his tour of hell and its residents, Dante Alighieri turns his attention to a more cheerful (if less juicy) supernatural realm. "Purgatorio" is less famous than its predecessor, but it's still a beautiful piece of work that explores the mindset not of the damned, but of sinners who are undergoing a divine cleansing -- beautiful, hopeful and a little sad.

Outside of Hell, Dante and Virgil encounter a small boat piloted by an angel and filled with human souls -- and unlike the damned, they're eager to find "the mountain." And as Hell had circles of damnation, Purgatory has terraces that the redeemable souls climb on their way towards Heaven, and none of the people there will leave their terrace until they are cleansed.

And the sins that are cleansed here are the seven deadly ones: the proud, the envious, the wrathful, the greedy, the lazy, the gluttonous, and the lustful. But as Dante moves slowly through the terraces, he finds himself gaining a new tour guide as he approaches Heaven...

I'll say this openly: the second part of the "Divine Comedy" is simply not as deliciously entertaining as "Inferno" -- it was kind of fun to see Dante skewering the corrupt people of his time, and describing the sort of grotesque punishments they merited. But while not as fun, "Purgatorio" is a more transcendent, hopeful kind of story since all the souls there will eventually be cleansed and make their way to Heaven.

As a result, "Purgatorio" is filled with a kind of eager anticipation -- there's flowers, stars, dancing, angelic ferrymen, mythic Grecian rivers and an army of souls who are all-too-eager to get to Purgatory so their purification can start. Alighieri's timeless poetry has a silken quality, from beginning to end ("But here, since I am yours, o holy Muses/may this poem rise again from Hell's dead realm/and may Calliope rise somewhat here/accompanying my singing...") and it's crammed with classical references and Christian symbolism (the Sun's part in advancing the soiled souls).

And the trip through Purgatory seems to have a strong effect on Dante's self-insert, who appears less repulsed and more fascinated by what he sees there. It's hard not to feel sorry for him when the paternal Virgil exits the Comedy, but at least he has someone else appears to guide him.

The middle part of the Divine Comedy isn't as juicy as "Inferno," but the beauty of Dante Alighieri's writing makes up for it."Purgatorio" is a must read... and then on to Paradise.

5-0 out of 5 stars Impressive
Third volume of the Divine Comedy, focusing on the narrator's ascent into the height of religious truth, mystery, beauty and goodness. This volume suffers from an interest issue compared to the previous ones in that there's a direct absence of drama or real striking, and lends itself to a staleness that usually occurs in an attempt to intimately describe the ultimate good, whether it's God, utopia or heaven. Surprisingly, that didn't happen in this work, and the result proved itself actually quite engaging. It wasn't flawless, and in the early sections particularly was rather slow in pace, seeming to drift somewhat and struggle to find the proper balance between description and speeches. Another persistent point of irritation was the stopping of the heavenly focus to have some character deliver a pointed Take That against a corrupt politician or pontiff of Dante's time. Of course a large purpose of the Divine Comedy had been to threaten and torment people that Dante didn't like. At least it was the main point in Inferno, here the drawn out condemnations feel redundant and jarring. Similarly, the views on politics don't emerge as hugely productive, seeming at once over conventional and too dated by the context of the time.

Ultimately the volume works on the strength of its poetry and the way it's able to energetically imagine what it insists is beyond imaginable. This structure builds up a surprisingly effective source of dramatic tension, between the format offered by aesthetics and the effort to explore religious summit. Ultimately while I'm thoroughly not a believer and found the whole Christian labeling rather irksome there are a lot of scenes of great emotional energy and literary talent. It scopes about explicitly eternity, and offers an attempt at working in ultimates that is quite powerful.

Better than: Purgatorio by Dante Alighieri
Worse than: Revolt of the Angels by Anatole France

5-0 out of 5 stars Noted poet/scholar Allen Mandelbaum's moving, faithful (inexpensive!) translation
I've read THE DIVINE COMEDY in the original Italian and I highly recommend poet and scholar Allen Mandelbaum's acclaimed (facing page) translation (in 3 inexpensive mass-market paperbacks from Bantam: Inferno (Bantam Classics): 0553213393 / Purgatorio (Bantam Classics): 055321344X / Paradiso (Bantam Classics): 0553212044). Originally published in hardcover by the University of California Press, these free-verse English works carry the melancholic tone and the humanity of the original more faithfully than several other translations I've read. The maps/charts/notes for these mass market paperbacks are excellent (if relatively brief) and will likely satisfy the reader with a general interest in World Literature.

There is no end of commentary out there, extending back to Dante's own time (700 years worth!). Many Italian Studies professors lament that Dante's most famous work gets duller with each volume. I disagree, in part. Though the INFERNO is undoubtedly the most dramatic, I believe that the PURGATORY is the most satisfying, because it is so recognizably human. The PARADISE is not my favorite as I've never been enthusiastic about theology, though the PARADISE (and THE DIVINE COMEDY in toto) may be best appreciated as a microcosm of medieval European thought. One must also appreciate the difficult conditions under which this masterpiece was composed -- in exile -- no doubt a much more trying experience in early 14th century "Italy" than in our time. You don't have to agree with Dante to admire him and his art. The man suffered, and you can feel it. I believe the intensity of feeling in the poem is, in part, what distinguishes it from many other well-known epic poems which demonstrate more artifice than humanity.

N.B.: Mandelbaum's complete translation of THE DIVINE COMEDY is also available in a single-volume, portable cloth-hardcover edition, though the single-volume is in English with no facing-page original Italian (and with notes by Peter Armour): Everyman's Library, ISBN 0679433139. The Divine Comedy: Inferno; Purgatorio; Paradiso (Everyman's Library)
If you find you love Mandelbaum's translation and Barry Moser's haunting ink-wash illustrations, you can search for the original (bilingual) editions from the Univ. of CA Press.

If you're looking for a different translation of The Divine Comedy, many scholars agree that the following free-verse English-language versions are currently the pick of the crop (and also more expensive than the Mandelbaum/Bantam Classics):

Robert Durling's INFERNO and PURGATORIO translations with excellent, brief notes (and beautiful maps and cover illustrations) -- Oxford Univ. Press. Durling is currently working on his translation of the PARADISO;

Charles S. Singleton's scholarly translation/notes for the Inferno/Purgatory/Paradise are expensive (though you might find inexpensive used copies), and probably best appreciated by Dante aficionados -- Princeton Univ. Press;

At this time I have not yet read the recent translations by the Hollanders, which are said to be fantastic. I believe much of the praise is for the accompanying notes which condense Hollander's voluminous knowledge. I've read some of the notes and they are very impressive. Robert Hollander is another esteemed Dante scholar.

Dedicated students of Dante will want to check out Princeton's online Dante database (the Princeton Dante Project [PDP] and Dartmouth College's online Dante database, the Dartmouth Dante Project [DDP], both directed by Robert Hollander.

If you're looking for an attempt at capturing the rhyme of the original Italian (terza rima), a Norton Critical Edition of Michael Palma's rhyming translation of the Inferno (Norton Critical Editions) (edited by Giuseppe Mazzotta) is available (ISBN-10: 039397796X ; ISBN-13: 9780393977967). The NCE is loaded with great supplementary material (annotation, backgrounds, criticism, etc.).

Other attempts at capturing the Dante's rhyme scheme: Longfellow (edited by the Bondanellas of Indiana Univ.), Dorothy Sayers or Laurence Binyon (L.B.'s is out-of-print but available through used booksellers).

John A. Scott's UNDERSTANDING DANTE (The William and Katherine Devers Series in Dante Studies) may be the best and most comprehensive one-volume guide in English to Dante Alighieri and his work. I've read much on Dante and found it fascinating and highly informative--but more significantly, it's been highly praised by a number of notables in the field. ISBN-10: 0268044511.

5-0 out of 5 stars Triumph of Style over Story
Paradiso is inherently dull. The very nature of heaven makes it so. Not only is there no flesh, there is no conflict and there isn't even any change. With the stuff of drama absent and only bliss to look upon, what is there to say? Or rather, what is there to listen to?
In this case, as the story of our poet recedes and as Virgil is replaced by the ethereal Beatrice, the substance of the poem becomes the poetry. That is, the voice of Dante becomes paramount. If you read this in Italian, that's reward enough. I would guess that Paradiso is the canticle most often quoted in the original language.
In English however, this is tough sledding. The wily Ciardi didn't quite pull it off and all the earlier translations are hopeless. Then along comes Mandelbaum. The language is elevated without being unreachable. It is still not a volume that's impossible to put down, but it is a volume that you have to pick up again and again.

Lynn Hoffman, author of bang BANG: A Novel

5-0 out of 5 stars The Closing Of The Trilogy
As with the other two books of the Divine Comedy, Paradiso could be a stand alone work of literature in its own right.The Grande Finale of Dante's massive poem ends with a flourish and upholds the tradition of masterful writing set forth by Inferno and Purgatorio.

This book should only truly be read upon completing Inferno and Purgatorio as many of the asides and relationships were first developed there.Allen Mandelbaum does a wonderful job of translating the poem but of also providing the reader with numerous notes and explanations on certain phrases or objects within the Cantos.This version is by far the easiest and most complete and can be enjoyed by both the casual and experienced reader. ... Read more


34. The Divine Comedy, Part 2: Purgatory (Penguin Classics) (v. 2)
by Dante Alighieri
Paperback: 400 Pages (1955-08-30)
list price: US$12.00 -- used & new: US$6.69
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Asin: 0140440461
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Beginning with Dante's liberation from Hell, Purgatory relates his ascent, accompanied by Virgil, of the Mount of Purgatory a mountain of nine levels, formed from rock forced upwards when God threw Satan into depths of the earth. As he travels through the first seven levels, Dante observes the sinners who are waiting for their release into Paradise, and through these encounters he is himself transformed into a stronger and better man. For it is only when he has learned from each of these levels that he can ascend to the gateway to Heaven: the Garden of Eden. The second part of one of the greatest epic poems, Purgatory is an enthralling Christian allegory of sin, redemption and ultimate enlightenment. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (8)

5-0 out of 5 stars Medieval vision of the afterlife
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.Norton edition has great articles to help explain the work and is a great translation.The other great translation is by Mark Musa."The Divine Comedy" describes Dante's journey through Hell (Inferno), Purgatory (Purgatorio), and Paradise (Paradiso), guided first by the Roman epic poet Virgil and then by Beatrice, the subject of his love and another of his works, "La Vita Nuova." While the vision of Hell, the Inferno, is vivid for modern readers, the theological niceties presented in the other books require a certain amount of patience and scholarship to understand.Purgatorio, the most lyrical and human of the three, also has the most poets in it; Paradiso, the most heavily theological, has the most beautiful and ecstatic mystic passages in which Dante tries to describe what he confesses he is unable to convey (e.g., when Dante looks into the face of God: "all'alta fantasia qui mancò possa" - "at this high moment, ability failed my capacity to describe," Paradiso, XXXIII, 142).

Dante wrote the Comedy in his regional dialect.By creating a poem of epic structure and philosophic purpose, he established that the Italian language was suitable for the highest sort of expression, and simultaneously established the Tuscan dialect as the standard for Italian. In French, Italian is nicknamed la langue de Dante.Publishing in the vernacular language marked Dante as one of the first (among others such as Geoffrey Chaucer and Giovanni Boccaccio) to break from standards of publishing in only Latin or Greek (the languages of Church and antiquity).This break allowed more literature to be published for a wider audience - setting the stage for greater levels of literacy in the future.

Readers often cannot understand how such a serious work may be called a "comedy".In Dante's time, all serious scholarly works were written in Latin (a tradition that would persist for several hundred years more, until the waning years of the Enlightenment) and works written in any other language were assumed to be comedic in nature.Furthermore, the word "comedy," in the classical sense, refers to works which reflect belief in an ordered universe, in which events not only tended towards a happy or "amusing" ending, but an ending influenced by a Providential will that orders all things to an ultimate good.By this meaning of the word, the progression of Dante's pilgrim from Hell to Paradise is the paradigmatic expression of comedy, since the work begins with the pilgrim's moral confusion and ends with the vision of God.

The Divine Comedy can be described simply as an allegory: Each canto, and the episodes therein, can contain many alternate meanings.Dante's allegory, however, is more complex, and, in explaining how to read the poem (see the "Letter to Can Grande della Scala"), he outlines other levels of meaning besides the allegory (the historical, the moral, the literal, and the anagogical).The structure of the poem, likewise, is quite complex, with mathematical and numerological patterns arching throughout the work, particularly threes and nines.The poem is often lauded for its particularly human qualities: Dante's skillful delineation of the characters he encounters in Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise; his bitter denunciations of Florentine and Italian politics; and his powerful poetic imagination.Dante's use of real characters, according to Dorothy Sayers in her introduction to her translation of "L'Inferno", allows Dante the freedom of not having to involve the reader in description, and allows him to "[make] room in his poem for the discussion of a great many subjects of the utmost importance, thus widening its range and increasing its variety."

Dante called the poem "Comedy" (the adjective "Divine" added later in the 16th century) because poems in the ancient world were classified as High ("Tragedy") or Low ("Comedy"). Low poems had happy endings and were of everyday or vulgar subjects, while High poems were for more serious matters. Dante was one of the first in the Middle Ages to write of a serious subject, the Redemption of man, in the low and vulgar Italian language and not the Latin language as one might expect for such a serious topic.

Paradiso
After an initial ascension (Canto I), Beatrice guides Dante through the nine spheres of Heaven. These are concentric and spherical, similar to Aristotelian and Ptolemaic cosmology.Dante admits that the vision of heaven he receives is the one that his human eyes permit him to see. Thus, the vision of heaven found in the Cantos is Dante's own personal vision, ambiguous in its true construction.The addition of a moral dimension means that a soul that has reached Paradise stops at the level applicable to it.Souls are allotted to the point of heaven that fits with their human ability to love God.Thus, there is a heavenly hierarchy. All parts of heaven are accessible to the heavenly soul.That is to say all experience God but there is a hierarchy in the sense that some souls are more spiritually developed than others.This is not determined by time or learning as such but by their proximity to God (how much they allow themselves to experience him above other things).It must be remembered in Dante's schema that all souls in Heaven are on some level always in contact with God.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.

4-0 out of 5 stars Book is for the more theologically minded
The book is a classic, and for those who are willing to spend time going through the explanations that follow the poem's text, it's an interesting read.In his poem, Dante comments on church history, theological topics like free will and determinism, and makes what were then scandalous comments about how there was corruption within the papal system of the time.It's tough to read, but if you are patient and interested in allegory on purgatory, it's for you!

5-0 out of 5 stars Terrific spiritual classic
After seeing Dante referred to by so many Christian authors over the years, I finally decided I'd better read this "timeless spiritual classic."I was expecting a dry, dull slog.
Fortunately, I consulted a friend who is a Classicist.I told him I wanted to read Dante for spiritual value, not just as great literature (I'm no poetry expert, nor do I speak a word of Italian).He recommended Dorothy Sayer's translation.
Wow.Reading Dante during Lent is one long, detailed examination of conscience!It is great, and Sayers' explanations and commentaries are terrific: erudite, informative, drily witty, and full of spiritual insight.

5-0 out of 5 stars Poetry even for us monoglots
Let's begin with Dante. Called "the divine poet" (hence the adjective attached to his humbly titled Commedia), it is a difficult moniker to argue with, not because Dante is writing of heaven but because his imagery, his imagination, and his humility are true imitations of the creative activity of God. Dante is a sublime "sub-creator" to use the coinage of JRR Tolkien. If you can read theCommedia and not be moved to tears, one is tempted to doubt your humanity for Dante portrays the race in all its beauty and putridness and denies neither. He neither celebrates mankind's faculties and achievements beyond their due nor fears to recognize the vileness of which humans are capable.

And it is Canticle II, the poet's ascent through Purgatory, which stirs so deeply the soul and inspires the very penitence and hope of purgation which Dante describes there. One need not be a Roman Catholic or ascribe to Purgatory as doctrine in order to recognize and appreciate what Dante has done in describing the landscape of repentance and hope. (Being a Christian may help, but even on this point one suspects that the divine poet may well perform the function of evangelist, as well as exegete, and lead the searching soul to beatific vision of its own.) Clearly his purpose is not merely to describe what sinners of the past are doing in the afterlife to purify their souls for Paradise, but also to inspire his contemporary readers (who are, of course, yet living when the poem is published in 1321) to examine themselves just as the joyful penitents do on the cornices of Mount Purgatory. It is refreshing--a sort of glorious wound, the healing of which leaves one stronger and more whole than he had been before the hurt.

But what of the translation? We who do not (yet) enjoy the privilege of reading the Commedia in Italian must read the poem in translation--and there are plenty to choose from! Given its primacy among the works of Western Literature in the Middle Ages, the poem has been translated by everyone from Dryden and Pope to Allen Mandelbaum and John Ciardi. So first of all, without question one MUST insist on a verse translation! Prose translations can hardly suffice to communicate the rhythm and terseness of Dante's terza rima which is so integral to the poem. Nor can the majesty of the subject, the grandeur of the poet's climb toward Paradise with all its anticipation and awe be fully communicated in a prose rendering. How well various attempts at verse have succeeded in doing so is the big debate.

In this reviewer's humble opinion, Dorothy L Sayers has succeeded to a degree which surpasses any extant English translation. Are there occasional awkwardnesses? Yes. Is the literal meaning of some lines lost from time to time? Yes, but always for the sake of a gain in some other important respect and always with explanation. Sayers' is the only translation of note which manages to render in English the full terza rima rhyme scheme employed by Dante--and even that feat is worth a few awkward passages or archaisms, it seems to me. One feels much closer to the Divine Poet reading Sayers' translation aloud than, say, Ciardi's half-attempted rhymes, lucid as he can often be.

Whatever else you do, read the Commedia--all of it! It is rather unfortunate that it has become common practice to publish the poem in three volumes rather than presenting it as an integrated whole. Though the familiarity of many ends with Inferno, those who press on I suspect will love Purgatorio best (but fortunately one is not forced to choose), and I am confident readers will be well rewarded for reading Sayers' brilliant translation. One would be hard pressed to find a translator who was more passionate about her subject and who labored more lovingly and meticulously over her rendering of this beloved work than Dorothy L Sayers.

5-0 out of 5 stars DOROTHY L. SAYERS' GENIUS GLOWS IN HER TRANSLATION OF THE COMMEDIA
This project was her dying effort after a lifetime of great achievements in scholarship and literature. She again proves her genius here with Dante, as in her translation of the Inferno, making an intelligent translation into her contemporary and scholarly English. Incredible achievement for a woman, the first to graduate from Oxford, who wrote treatises in THeology as well as the wonderful Lord Whimsey detective series.

... Read more


35. The New Life/La Vita Nuova: A Dual-Language Book (Dover Books on Language) (Italian and English Edition)
by Dante Alighieri
Paperback: 128 Pages (2006-12-15)
list price: US$8.95 -- used & new: US$5.23
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0486453499
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This youthful masterpiece by the author of The Divine Comedy recounts the love and loss of Beatrice, Dante's lifelong inspiration. An allegory of spiritual crisis and growth, it combines prose and poetry in a powerful work in the literature of love. This new translation features an informative introduction and notes.
... Read more

36. Paradise (Modern Library Classics)
by Dante
Paperback: 544 Pages (2007-02-13)
list price: US$12.95 -- used & new: US$8.60
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Asin: 0812977262
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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“If there is any justice in the world of books, [Esolen’s] will be the standard Dante . . . for some time to come.”–Robert Royal, Crisis

In this, the concluding volume of The Divine Comedy, Dante ascends from the devastation of the Inferno and the trials of Purgatory. Led by his beloved Beatrice, he enters Paradise, to profess his faith, hope, and love before the Heavenly court. Completed shortly before his death, Paradise is the volume that perhaps best expresses Dante’s spiritual philosophy about resurrection, redemption, and the nature of divinity. It also affords modern-day readers a clear window into late medieval perceptions about faith. A bilingual text, classic illustrations by Gustave Doré, an appendix that reproduces Dante’s key sources, and other features make this the definitive edition of Dante’s ultimate masterwork. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (4)

5-0 out of 5 stars Epic storytelling in poetry
If you want epic storytelling and great poetry - this is the real thing!And the Anthony Esolen translation is the best by far.Highly recommended! Paradise (Modern Library Classics)

5-0 out of 5 stars Medieval vision of the afterlife
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
"The Divine Comedy" describes Dante's journey through Hell (Inferno), Purgatory (Purgatorio), and Paradise (Paradiso), guided first by the Roman epic poet Virgil and then by Beatrice, the subject of his love and another of his works, "La Vita Nuova." While the vision of Hell, the Inferno, is vivid for modern readers, the theological niceties presented in the other books require a certain amount of patience and scholarship to understand.Purgatorio, the most lyrical and human of the three, also has the most poets in it; Paradiso, the most heavily theological, has the most beautiful and ecstatic mystic passages in which Dante tries to describe what he confesses he is unable to convey (e.g., when Dante looks into the face of God: "all'alta fantasia qui mancò possa" - "at this high moment, ability failed my capacity to describe," Paradiso, XXXIII, 142).

Dante wrote the Comedy in his regional dialect.By creating a poem of epic structure and philosophic purpose, he established that the Italian language was suitable for the highest sort of expression, and simultaneously established the Tuscan dialect as the standard for Italian. In French, Italian is nicknamed la langue de Dante.Publishing in the vernacular language marked Dante as one of the first (among others such as Geoffrey Chaucer and Giovanni Boccaccio) to break from standards of publishing in only Latin or Greek (the languages of Church and antiquity).This break allowed more literature to be published for a wider audience - setting the stage for greater levels of literacy in the future.

Readers often cannot understand how such a serious work may be called a "comedy".In Dante's time, all serious scholarly works were written in Latin (a tradition that would persist for several hundred years more, until the waning years of the Enlightenment) and works written in any other language were assumed to be comedic in nature.Furthermore, the word "comedy," in the classical sense, refers to works which reflect belief in an ordered universe, in which events not only tended towards a happy or "amusing" ending, but an ending influenced by a Providential will that orders all things to an ultimate good.By this meaning of the word, the progression of Dante's pilgrim from Hell to Paradise is the paradigmatic expression of comedy, since the work begins with the pilgrim's moral confusion and ends with the vision of God.

The Divine Comedy can be described simply as an allegory: Each canto, and the episodes therein, can contain many alternate meanings.Dante's allegory, however, is more complex, and, in explaining how to read the poem (see the "Letter to Can Grande della Scala"), he outlines other levels of meaning besides the allegory (the historical, the moral, the literal, and the anagogical).The structure of the poem, likewise, is quite complex, with mathematical and numerological patterns arching throughout the work, particularly threes and nines.The poem is often lauded for its particularly human qualities: Dante's skillful delineation of the characters he encounters in Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise; his bitter denunciations of Florentine and Italian politics; and his powerful poetic imagination.Dante's use of real characters, according to Dorothy Sayers in her introduction to her translation of "L'Inferno", allows Dante the freedom of not having to involve the reader in description, and allows him to "[make] room in his poem for the discussion of a great many subjects of the utmost importance, thus widening its range and increasing its variety."

Dante called the poem "Comedy" (the adjective "Divine" added later in the 16th century) because poems in the ancient world were classified as High ("Tragedy") or Low ("Comedy"). Low poems had happy endings and were of everyday or vulgar subjects, while High poems were for more serious matters. Dante was one of the first in the Middle Ages to write of a serious subject, the Redemption of man, in the low and vulgar Italian language and not the Latin language as one might expect for such a serious topic.

Paradiso
After an initial ascension (Canto I), Beatrice guides Dante through the nine spheres of Heaven. These are concentric and spherical, similar to Aristotelian and Ptolemaic cosmology.Dante admits that the vision of heaven he receives is the one that his human eyes permit him to see. Thus, the vision of heaven found in the Cantos is Dante's own personal vision, ambiguous in its true construction.The addition of a moral dimension means that a soul that has reached Paradise stops at the level applicable to it.Souls are allotted to the point of heaven that fits with their human ability to love God.Thus, there is a heavenly hierarchy. All parts of heaven are accessible to the heavenly soul.That is to say all experience God but there is a hierarchy in the sense that some souls are more spiritually developed than others.This is not determined by time or learning as such but by their proximity to God (how much they allow themselves to experience him above other things).It must be remembered in Dante's schema that all souls in Heaven are on some level always in contact with God.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.

5-0 out of 5 stars Medieval vision of the afterlife
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history.
"The Divine Comedy" describes Dante's journey through Hell (Inferno), Purgatory (Purgatorio), and Paradise (Paradiso), guided first by the Roman epic poet Virgil and then by Beatrice, the subject of his love and another of his works, "La Vita Nuova." While the vision of Hell, the Inferno, is vivid for modern readers, the theological niceties presented in the other books require a certain amount of patience and scholarship to understand.Purgatorio, the most lyrical and human of the three, also has the most poets in it; Paradiso, the most heavily theological, has the most beautiful and ecstatic mystic passages in which Dante tries to describe what he confesses he is unable to convey (e.g., when Dante looks into the face of God: "all'alta fantasia qui mancò possa" - "at this high moment, ability failed my capacity to describe," Paradiso, XXXIII, 142).

Dante wrote the Comedy in his regional dialect.By creating a poem of epic structure and philosophic purpose, he established that the Italian language was suitable for the highest sort of expression, and simultaneously established the Tuscan dialect as the standard for Italian. In French, Italian is nicknamed la langue de Dante.Publishing in the vernacular language marked Dante as one of the first (among others such as Geoffrey Chaucer and Giovanni Boccaccio) to break from standards of publishing in only Latin or Greek (the languages of Church and antiquity).This break allowed more literature to be published for a wider audience - setting the stage for greater levels of literacy in the future.

Readers often cannot understand how such a serious work may be called a "comedy".In Dante's time, all serious scholarly works were written in Latin (a tradition that would persist for several hundred years more, until the waning years of the Enlightenment) and works written in any other language were assumed to be comedic in nature.Furthermore, the word "comedy," in the classical sense, refers to works which reflect belief in an ordered universe, in which events not only tended towards a happy or "amusing" ending, but an ending influenced by a Providential will that orders all things to an ultimate good.By this meaning of the word, the progression of Dante's pilgrim from Hell to Paradise is the paradigmatic expression of comedy, since the work begins with the pilgrim's moral confusion and ends with the vision of God.

The Divine Comedy can be described simply as an allegory: Each canto, and the episodes therein, can contain many alternate meanings.Dante's allegory, however, is more complex, and, in explaining how to read the poem (see the "Letter to Can Grande della Scala"), he outlines other levels of meaning besides the allegory (the historical, the moral, the literal, and the anagogical).The structure of the poem, likewise, is quite complex, with mathematical and numerological patterns arching throughout the work, particularly threes and nines.The poem is often lauded for its particularly human qualities: Dante's skillful delineation of the characters he encounters in Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise; his bitter denunciations of Florentine and Italian politics; and his powerful poetic imagination.Dante's use of real characters, according to Dorothy Sayers in her introduction to her translation of "L'Inferno", allows Dante the freedom of not having to involve the reader in description, and allows him to "[make] room in his poem for the discussion of a great many subjects of the utmost importance, thus widening its range and increasing its variety."

Dante called the poem "Comedy" (the adjective "Divine" added later in the 16th century) because poems in the ancient world were classified as High ("Tragedy") or Low ("Comedy"). Low poems had happy endings and were of everyday or vulgar subjects, while High poems were for more serious matters. Dante was one of the first in the Middle Ages to write of a serious subject, the Redemption of man, in the low and vulgar Italian language and not the Latin language as one might expect for such a serious topic.

Paradiso
After an initial ascension (Canto I), Beatrice guides Dante through the nine spheres of Heaven. These are concentric and spherical, similar to Aristotelian and Ptolemaic cosmology.Dante admits that the vision of heaven he receives is the one that his human eyes permit him to see. Thus, the vision of heaven found in the Cantos is Dante's own personal vision, ambiguous in its true construction.The addition of a moral dimension means that a soul that has reached Paradise stops at the level applicable to it.Souls are allotted to the point of heaven that fits with their human ability to love God.Thus, there is a heavenly hierarchy. All parts of heaven are accessible to the heavenly soul.That is to say all experience God but there is a hierarchy in the sense that some souls are more spiritually developed than others.This is not determined by time or learning as such but by their proximity to God (how much they allow themselves to experience him above other things).It must be remembered in Dante's schema that all souls in Heaven are on some level always in contact with God.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great translation
I haven't read Esolen's Inferno, but his translation of Purgatory was superb--not just the translation itself but the notes, which I'm fairly certain Esolen wrote.After translating the Inferno, the Purgatory, and then the Paradise, Esolen was stimulated to write a magnificent interpretative introduction to the Paradise which is one of the best pieces I've ever read on Dante.

Esolen's Introduction to the Paradise ranks with Erich Auerbach's essays on Dante in Mimesis and Scenes from the Drama of European Literature, and I prefer it to T. S. Eliot's famous essay on Dante; it is a classic.Esolen's introduction to the Paradise in this edition is alone worth the price of the book, and I would characterise it as a must-read for anyone interested in Dante and his Comedy.

As with the previous volumes of the Comedy, in the Paradise Esolen again proves himself to be a sensitive and judicious translator, and the notes are again excellent. ... Read more


37. Divine Comedy
by Dante Alighieri
Hardcover: 384 Pages (2008-07-23)
list price: US$24.99 -- used & new: US$16.49
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Asin: 0785821201
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Long narrative poem originally titled Commedia (about 1555 printed as La divina commedia) written about 1310-14 by Dante. The work is divided into three major sections--Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso--which trace the journey of a man from darkness and error to the revelation of the divine light, culminating in the beatific vision of God. It is usually held to be one of the world's greatest works of literature. The plot of The Divine Comedy is simple: a man is miraculously enabled to visit the souls in Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise. He has two guides: Virgil, who leads him through the Inferno and Purgatorio, and Beatrice, who introduces him to Paradiso. Through these fictional encounters taking place from Good Friday evening in 1300 through Easter Sunday and slightly beyond, Dante the character learns of the exile that is awaiting him (an actual exile that had already occurred at the time of writing). This device allowed Dante not only to create a story out of his exile but also to explain how he came to cope with personal calamity and to offer suggestions for the resolution of Italy's troubles as well.
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Customer Reviews (17)

1-0 out of 5 stars Do not order from "thermite_media"
I ordered twice from them only to have the order cancelled without any notification other than e-mail.
Amazon has a great system that Thermite Media must exploit. By cancelling your order there is no way to leave negative feedback.Thanks Amazon.

DO NOT order ANYTHING from Thermite Media.
I have seen other reviews about them after I discovered this. Unreliable vendor.
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5-0 out of 5 stars Medieval vision of the afterlife
This was required reading for a graduate course in medieval history. Norton edition has great articles to help explain the work and is a great translation. Dante Alighieri's (1265-1321) "Devine Comedy" weaved together aspects of biblical and classical Greek literary traditions to produce one of the most important works of not only medieval literature, but also one of the great literary works of Western civilization. The full impact of this 14,000-line poem divided into 100 cantos and three books is not just literary. Dante's autobiographical poem Commedia, as he titled it, was his look into the individual psyche and human soul. He explored and reflected on such fundamental questions as political institutions and their problems, the nature of humankind's moral actions, and the possibility of spiritual transformation; these were all fundamental social and cultural concerns for people during the fourteenth-century. Dante wrote the Commedia not in Latin but in the Tuscan dialect of Italian so that it would reach a broader readership. The Commedia was a three-part journey undertaken by the pilgrim Dante to the realms of the Christian afterlife: Hell, (Inferno), Purgatory, (Purgatorio), and Paradise, (Paradisio).

The poem narrated in first person, began with Dante lost midlife. He was 35 years old in the year 1300 and in a dark wood. Being lost in the dark wood was certainly an allegorical device that Dante used to express the condition of his own life at the time he started writing the poem. Dante had been active in Florentine politics and a member of the White Guelph party who opposed the secular rule of Pope Boniface VIII over Florence. In 1302, The Black Guelphs who were allied with the Pope, were militarily victorious in gaining control of the city and Dante found himself an exile from his beloved city for the rest of his life. Thus, Dante started writing the Commedia in 1308 and used it to comment on his own tribulations of life, and to state his views on politics and religion, and heap scorn on his political enemies.

Dante's first leg of his journey out of the dark wood was through the nine concentric circles of Hell (Inferno), escorted by his favorite classical Roman poet Virgil, author of the Aeneid. Dante borrowed heavily from Virgil's Aeneid. Much of Dante's description of hell had similarities to Virgil's description in his sixth book of the Aeneid. Dante's three major divisions of sin in hell where unrepentant sinners dwelled, had their sources in Aristotle and Augustinian philosophy. They were self-indulgence, violence, and fraud. Fraud was considered the worst of moral failures because it undermined family, trust, and religion; in essence, it tore at the moral fabric of civilized society. These divisions were inversions of the classical virtues of moderation, courage, and wisdom. The fourth classical virtue, justice, is what Dante came to believe after his journey through hell that all its inhabitants received for their unrepentant sins. There were nine concentric circles of hell inside the earth; each smaller than the previous one. For Dante the geography of hell was a moral geography as well as a physical one, reflecting the nature of the sin. Canto IV describes the first circle of hell, Limbo, which is where Dante met the shades, as souls where called, of the virtuous un-baptized such as Homer, Ovid, Caesar, Aristotle, and Plato.

In the four circles for the sin of self-indulgence Dante met shades who where lustful, gluttons, hoarders and wrathful. In the second circle of Hell, lustful souls were blown around in a violent storm. In Canto V, one of the great dramatic moments of the poem, Dante had his first lengthy encounter with an unrepentant sinner Francesca da Rimini, who committed adultery with her brother-in-law. Like all the sinners in hell, Francesca laid the blame for her sin elsewhere. She claimed to be seduced into committing adultery after reading the story of Lancelot and Guinevere. At the end of the scene, Dante fainted out of pity for Francesca.

In Canto X, the sixth circle of hell reserved for heretics who are punished by being trapped in flaming tombs, Dante took the opportunity to use the circle to chastise political leaders for participating in political partisanship. A Florentine who was a leader in the rival Ghibbelline political party, Farinata degli Uberti, accosted Dante. Both men aggressively argued with each other, recreating in hell the bitterness of partisan politics in Florence. Farinata predicted Dante's exile. Dante used this Canto to show the dangerous tendencies of petty political partisanship that he harbored.

The seventh circle of hell was subdivided into three areas where sinners were punished for doing violence against themselves, their neighbors, or God. In Canto XIII Dante encountered Pier della Vigne in the wood of the suicides. The shades there were shrubs who had to speak through a broken branch. Pier spoke to Dante about how he had been an important advisor to Emperor Frederick II, and how he blamed his fall, and his suicide, on the envy of other court members. This Canto was especially important because Dante came to grips with his own "future" fall from political power and exile. Pier's behavior served as a strong example to Dante how not to act in exile. Whether he had been tempted to commit suicide is not clear; however, he certainly had been prone to the selfish and despairing attitude that Pier represented.

The last two circles of hell contained the sinners of fraud. In the eighth circle, there were ten ditches for the various types of fraud such as Simony, thievery, hypocrisy, etc. Canto XIX described the third ditch, which contained those guilty of Simony, the sin of church leaders perverting their spiritual office by buying and selling church offices. Simonists were buried upside down in a rock with their feet on fire. Pope Nicholas III mistakenly addressed Dante as Pope Boniface VIII who was the current Pope in 1300, and whose place in hell was thereby predicted. This is not surprising since Boniface was the person most responsible for Dante's exile. In an interesting literary twist, Nicholas "confessed" to Dante, as if he was a priest, his sin of greed and nepotism. He admitted that even after becoming Pope he cared more for his family's interests than the good of the whole Church. Dante responded to Nicholas' "confession" with a stinging condemnation of Simony drawn from the Book of Revelation. After this encounter, Dante came to understand that hell was a place of justice.

Canto XXXIV, the last one in the Inferno, depicted Satan with three heads. Each head was chewing the three worst sinners of humankind. The middle head was chewing on the head of Judas Iscariot, who was a disciple to Jesus and his betrayer. The other two heads were chewing Brutus and Cassius; the murderers of Julius Caesar, and the two men Dante faulted for the destruction of a unified Italy. Dante considered the two ultimate betrayals against God and against the empire as the worst betrayals perpetrated in the history of humankind.

Thus, Dante's intent in his Commedia was to teach fourteenth-century readers that if one wanted to ascend spiritually towards God then one needed to learn the nature of sin from the unrepentant. By doing this, one could learn to overcome the same tendencies found in themselves. He wanted people to realize what he had come to learn that political partisanship would only stand in the way of unifying Italy and keep it from regaining any of its former glory that it enjoyed during the time of the Roman Empire.

Recommended reading for anyone interested in literature and medieval history.

3-0 out of 5 stars soso
The translation is still very old speak. Hard to understand and follow the story line.

5-0 out of 5 stars even better than it looked
I gotta say, I was blown away by the quality of this book. I was looking for something basic, and was very pleasantly surprised when I unwrapped this beautifull version of the book. Highly recommended.

5-0 out of 5 stars Just what I was looking for
The product was delivered in perfect condition and just as described by the seller. I would buy from this seller again. ... Read more


38. The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri, Volume 1
by Dante Alighieri
Paperback: 476 Pages (2010-03-16)
list price: US$37.75 -- used & new: US$21.37
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1147387559
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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Product Description
This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words.This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (8)

1-0 out of 5 stars Durling's trans is great: beware the current Kindle rendition
Some day, soon I hope, the providers of e-texts will begin to respect the wonderful books they deliver to us. Poetry is often disgracefully rendered. This exceptional 5-star translation by Robert Durling (I have the print version) is now an e-text dump, not an e-book. My Kindle can make no sense of a facing page translation with notes. What a shame. I would love to have this on my reader. Be sure to try the sample first. I look forward to a corrected version.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Translation
This is one of the best traslations of the Inferno that i have been able to find.It is easy to understand and certainly not convoluted as many other versions are.In addition this version offers the italian text which is a nice addition.Finally, the notes and commentary povided in this book are amazing and perfect for use in the classroom or just6 for general enjoyment.

5-0 out of 5 stars Dante's Inferno: Reprint Series
I found this edition of Dante's most famous book of the Divine Comedy to be excellent in all respects.The translation seemed excedingly accurate -- as an Italian prof. I was working almost exclusively from the original -- in a modern, clean style.Here the attempt is not to replicate the hendecasyllabic verse or the "third rhyming" ("terza rima").
More successful still are the notes that follow each canto, replete with explications of historical and theological references or simply of difficult lines.Not to be discounted too is the introduction which admits to not being exhaustive but is powerfully pithy and a nice springboard from which to attack the text.
Dr. Joseph A. DiLuzio

5-0 out of 5 stars Dante's Inferno
I absolutely love this book! The English translations and the notes at the end of each Canto are incredibly helpful.

5-0 out of 5 stars Best of the Series
Volume 1: Inferno is the best title of Dante's Divine Comedy.He presents a great look into the history of renaissance Italy around the 14th century.Robert M. Durling translates the old Italian in a simplistic yet powerful manner which allows anyone familiar with the language to understand.There are excellent notes at the end of every chapter to help reiterate the points and what they meant in that era.Also, keep a bible handy because several references come directly from the old text. ... Read more


39. Dante's Stolen Wife (Silhouette Desire)
by Day Leclaire
Mass Market Paperback: 192 Pages (2008-05-13)
list price: US$4.75 -- used & new: US$0.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0373768702
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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They called it The Inferno—the all-consuming desire that scorched a man just once in a lifetime. Millionaire Marco Dante felt its flames the moment he set eyes on Caitlyn Vaughn. Nothing could keep him from having her—not even her engagement to his twin brother! So he posed as her true fiancé, stealing her away for a rushed wedding and a breathtaking honeymoon. But then he had to face his new bride when she discovered his masquerade—and somehow find a way to turn her blazing fury back into white-hot passion.… ... Read more

Customer Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars ;0)
Marco you couldnt help but like him even though he did what he had to to marry the woman he believes is his soul mate a very good read and I'm interested in the other family's' story

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Plot that Follows Through
What motivated me to read this book was the plot.Upon meeting for five minutes, Marco Dante and Caitlyn Vaughn feel an immediate spark called The Inferno.The Inferno is what the Dante men experience with the women who are their soulmates.After their brief meeting, Caitlyn meets Marco's twin brother, Lazzaro, and assumes that he is Marco.Six weeks pass and she dates Lazz while Marco is overseas taking care of business.When Marco returns, he learns that Lazz intends to propose to her that very night, and Marco can't talk him out of it.Therefore, he comes up with the plan to pretend to be Lazz and convince her to marry him in Nevada.

She finds out the morning after their wedding who she really married and after some hesitation, she decides to give their marriage a chance.I thought Day Leclaire did a wonderful job in presenting an alpha male with a charming and gentle side.His treatment towards his wife is tender and loving.It's hard not to love a man like that!I liked the progression of the characters as they fell in love.Caitlyn likes order and predictability while Marco likes rushing into things.As the story unravels, she becomes more creative and quick thinking, and he stars to think before acting. They balance each other out very well. There is a sub-plot that involves an insider revealing private Dante information to the tabloid paper, but I won't give that away since it leads to the climax of the story.This is a great contemporary romance with a fairytale appeal.

5-0 out of 5 stars A must read for romance lovers.
Great read with an interesting plot. I highly recommend this book . This book series has not failed yet. ... Read more


40. Dante's Inferno
by Christos Gage
Paperback: 144 Pages (2010-07-06)
list price: US$19.99 -- used & new: US$4.74
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1401228127
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Based on the upcoming EA video game of the same name, this classic epic poem is brought to life as never before, courtesy of writer Christos Gage (WILDCATS, X-Men/Spider-Man) and hot new artist Diego Latorre. Dante Alighieri is re-imagined as a holy warrior who has returned from the Crusades to find his beloved fiancée Beatrice murdered. When her soul is ensnared by Lucifer, only Dante has the strength and courage to break open the gates of Hell and save her. But at what cost to his own immortal soul? And is Dante himself pure enough for this impossible task? Find out in this sizzling new series! ... Read more


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