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1. Fountains in the SandRambles Among
 
2. TOGETHER.
 
3. One day. Signed by the author.
 
4. South wind
 
5. D. H. Lawrence and Maurice Magnus.
 
6. SOUTH WIND. Modern Library #5.
 
7. In the beginning
 
8. Together. Signed by the author.
 
9. In the beginning. Signed by the
$9.95
10. Biography - Douglas, (George)
 
11. Norman Douglas, 1868-1952;: Tabulation
 
12. Fountains in the sand : rambles
 
13. They went.
$12.00
14. Old Calabria
$7.69
15. Siren Land: A Celebration of Life
 
16. Looking Back: An Autobiographical
 
17. Siren Land
$10.35
18. Lunch with Elizabeth David: A

1. Fountains in the SandRambles Among the Oases of Tunisia
by Norman, 1868-1952 Douglas
Kindle Edition: Pages (2009-10-04)
list price: US$1.99
Asin: B002RKS4OU
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Editorial Review

Product Description
This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery. ... Read more


2. TOGETHER.
by Norman (1868-1952) Douglas
 Hardcover: Pages (1927-01-01)

Asin: B000Q5IU9M
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3. One day. Signed by the author.
by Norman 1868-1952 Douglas
 Hardcover: Pages (1929-01-01)

Asin: B0021R2AAS
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4. South wind
by Norman (1868-1952). Van Doren, Carl (1885-1950). Petrina, Carlotta (190 Douglas
 Hardcover: Pages (2222)

Asin: B003TSVVMQ
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5. D. H. Lawrence and Maurice Magnus. A plea for better manners.
by Norman 1868-1952 Douglas
 Paperback: Pages (1924-01-01)

Asin: B000KVHQ3S
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6. SOUTH WIND. Modern Library #5. With a Special Introduction by the Author.
by Norman [1868 - 1952]. Douglas
 Hardcover: Pages (1925)

Asin: B00419RXOW
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7. In the beginning
by Norman (1868-1952) Douglas
 Hardcover: Pages (1928-01-01)

Asin: B002KRA5HO
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8. Together. Signed by the author.
by Norman 1868-1952 Douglas
 Hardcover: Pages (1923-01-01)

Asin: B0032ORJF0
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9. In the beginning. Signed by the author.
by Norman 1868-1952 Douglas
 Hardcover: Pages (1927-01-01)

Asin: B0032OPIGW
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10. Biography - Douglas, (George) Norman (1868-1952): An article from: Contemporary Authors
by Gale Reference Team
Digital: 8 Pages (2003-01-01)
list price: US$9.95 -- used & new: US$9.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0007SBCG6
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Editorial Review

Product Description
This digital document, covering the life and work of (George) Norman Douglas, is an entry from Contemporary Authors, a reference volume published by Thompson Gale. The length of the entry is 2352 words. The page length listed above is based on a typical 300-word page. Although the exact content of each entry from this volume can vary, typical entries include the following information:

  • Place and date of birth and death (if deceased)
  • Family members
  • Education
  • Professional associations and honors
  • Employment
  • Writings, including books and periodicals
  • A description of the author's work
  • References to further readings about the author
... Read more

11. Norman Douglas, 1868-1952;: Tabulation of books and other writings by or about him. Also, association items in the personal collection of his younger son, Robin
by Robin Douglas
 Unknown Binding: 36 Pages (1954)

Asin: B0007G1272
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12. Fountains in the sand : rambles among the oases of Tunisia by No
by Douglas. Norman. 1868-1952.
 Paperback: Pages (1912-01-01)

Asin: B002WTTN6Y
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13. They went.
by Douglas. Norman. 1868-1952.
 Paperback: Pages (1921-01-01)

Asin: B002WU23PG
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14. Old Calabria
by Norman Douglas
Paperback: 360 Pages (1994-01)
list price: US$14.95 -- used & new: US$12.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0910395853
Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
An account of Norman Douglas's travels from village to village in Southern Italy around the turn of the century. From Gargano to Aspromonte, the natives - and even the dogs, are treated with a certain disdain as un-British comic types. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (4)

5-0 out of 5 stars An Excellent Read
This was a brilliant book and thoroughly enjoyable.At first I got it to look into the nature of the Calabrian people but soon realized it was the story of one man's interpretation of his own travels through Southern Italy in areas that may at one time have been part of Calabria.Interestingly San Giuseppe di Cupertino was mentioned in the book but he is from Le Marche, far north of Calabria if old.Still a witty and sarcastic endeavor that was fun to read.

5-0 out of 5 stars Montaigne meets Nabokov
If you enjoy books by literary travellers, you will love this one.In it a humane sensibility reveals itself inclean, meticulous prose.This is not a book about Calabria but a book about Norman Douglas in Calabria, a much more interesting topic.Read Paul Fussell's excellent essay on Douglas, "Norman Douglas's Temporary Attachments" and you will understand. In Abroad: British Literary Traveling between the Wars

1-0 out of 5 stars Old Calabria Revisited
'Old Calabria' is a travelogue reporting a British aristocrat's journey to Southern Italy and Calabria at the turn of the 20th century. For readers interested in Calabria, its real value lies in its depiction of how Southern Italy must have appeared to a foreigner's eyes at the time. Aside from the literary ability of the author, the book's subsequent success has depended more from the paucity of other accounts on Calabria in English than for any other intrinsic merit. Indeed, the book is much more interesting as an account of how Calabria has been represented by foreigners. There are a number of other accounts by English speakers on Calabria that are more nuanced and therefore more interesting. 'Old Calabria' reveals more about the common prejudices held by educated English speakers on Calabria than the region itself. In this book Norman Douglas perpetuates a number of mythologies regarding the South of Italy that are still current today as exoticising motifs, both in the negative and the positive: the "wildness" and "impenetrability" of Calabria, its deployment as a borderland between the great constructs called "Orient" and the "West" and so forth. For those people of Calabrian origins who have read the book in search of a sense of identity and feelings of self worth, this book may have loomed the larger, the greater their actual alienation from their origins. Rather than bringing them closer to an understanding of their identities, I would argue that the book has distanced them even further. It is through the very discourses that books such as these have perpetuated and legitimated in the English speaking world, that diasporic Calabrians have been alienated from themselves.

1-0 out of 5 stars Old Calabria
The book was not as I expected and rather dated in content, so it was no help to me in my current search for information on Calabria.I returned the book according to the credit guidelines from Amazon but did not receive a credit.

Ann Garland ... Read more


15. Siren Land: A Celebration of Life in Southern Italy
by Norman Douglas
Paperback: 216 Pages (2010-08-03)
list price: US$16.00 -- used & new: US$7.69
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1848850018
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Editorial Review

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Norman Douglas’s first travel book, Siren Land is an homage to a part of the world that captivated the author more than any other. Weaving the myths of the Sirens into the landscape and history of the region, Douglas writes with knowledge and an irrepressible exuberance of the past and the present, of legends and archaeology, folklore and daily life, patron saints, local ghosts, wine, and the wind.

... Read more

16. Looking Back: An Autobiographical Excursion
by Norman Douglas
 Hardcover: 428 Pages (1971-08)
list price: US$79.00
Isbn: 040300795X
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Product Description
Kessinger Publishing is the place to find hundreds of thousands of rare and hard-to-find books with something of interest for everyone! ... Read more


17. Siren Land
by Norman Douglas
 Hardcover: 208 Pages (1983-06)
list price: US$14.95
Isbn: 0436132044
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
There are two kinds of Englishmen--those who stay at home and those who go abroad. Douglas was one of the latter.

He was born in 1868, mid-Victorian, and received a classical education. To a lad of spirit and imagination, England was no place to stay.

So he shipped to Italy and there remained, steeped in the land and tradition, 100 years ahead of his time. In books such as SIREN LAND, he wrote of the timeless things that come to us from antiquity. His books are erudite and humane, rather like a seminar with a favorite professor.

But not dry! Douglas was a confirmed hedonist, and he milked the sensual pleasures for all they were worth. By 1952, the year in which he died he had his fill. Not suprisingly, he killed himself. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Capri and Sorrento: an elegy to their past and present
Siren Land is a strange book according to modern standards, it is actually not a modern book at all. It belongs to those essayistic travelogues that characterised the period from the end of the Nineteenth to the beginning of the Twentieth Century. It was written in 1911, on a journey performed by the Author in 1908. Norman Douglas (1868-1952), was a very peculiar writer, reared between Germany and England, devoid of a formal college education, ex diplomat, expatriate due to various sexual scandals (pederasty). He has left us three novels, and five travel books, of which Siren Land is the first.
The Siren Land encloses the Sorrentine Peninsula and Capri, which together form the Southern arm of the Bay of Naples. This country was a favorite resort of Englishmen traveling abroad and it represented for most Northners the paradise of the Mediterranean South. This magnificent region was once isentified as the home of the Sirens, mythological creatures half human and half birds (Homer), that the Middle Ages turned into women fish. Starting from this ancient Siren myth, Douglas narrates the topographical and archeological features of the Bay of Naples. First he climbs on the highest hights and "grasps" the geography and the sprit of the palce, and then with his beautiful prose he stars heading back and forth between history and the present. However, as in other books of his (Old Calabria, for example) narrative and description are interrupted by the frequent insertion of moral essays, on ethics derivable from ruins, absence of sexual liberty in the European North and other such issues. Chapters deal with local winds (the famous Scirocco of Capri, a Southeastern wing that drives people crazy) and their folklore, the character of Tiberio (the Roman Emperor that decided to spend his last ten years of life in Capri and that here is called Timberio and has been unjustly treated by Roman historians), local ghosts (from dead maidens, to priests and hermits),and that of Sister Seraphina (Capri's patron saint that is plasmated on Saint Teresa d'Avila), caves (the Blue Grotto for first, but also many others) and their narrative, leisure, local wine (that at Douglas's time wasn't very good - differently to today, go there today and ask for Biancolella d'Ischia - note from Sabina).
I am sure many readers will find this book difficult to read, because of the pre-modern sensibility of the Author. His humoristic Nietzschean naughtiness and the puritan determination of his atheism and hedonism, together with the eccentric attitude of the typical British abroad may seem fastidious to modern Europeans today, but if the approach to the read is orientated toward and antiquarian fascination with language and humanism intentended as the satisfaction of curiosity of one's whereabouts and nothing else, there is no book more pleasant expecially if you are resting on a balcony overlooking the Bay of Naples on a summer afternoon.
I must add a personal note. I bought this book during my honeymoon in Capri and have always treasured it in this edition but I hope it will be republished possibly with notes. To Italians Norman Douglas was a precious friend, he was elected honorary citizen of Capri after WWII and here he successively committed suicide many years later after having become one of the Island's monuments. Naturally time has taken his toll on this eccentric Englishman, but I believe he still inhabits the Island. ... Read more


18. Lunch with Elizabeth David: A Novel
by Roger Williams
Hardcover: 342 Pages (2000-03)
list price: US$24.95 -- used & new: US$10.35
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0786707070
Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
They meet by chance in 1940 - the debonair gastronome Norman Douglas and a stylish, slightly haughty, well-bred Elizabeth Gwynne - at a street market in the South of France. He lectures her on the marvels of tarragon, and in that seminal moment in Antibes begins the epicurean tutelage of the woman who became Elizabeth David, England's premier writer on continental cuisine, and who reeducated the palate of the English-speaking world with the robust flavors of Mediterranean living.

In that moment, too, Elizabeth David enters the enchanted circle of Norman Douglas's friends, among them Graham Greene, Gracie Fields, Nancy Cunard, and, less famously but more significantly, Eric Walton, the man who has known him as Uncle Norman since 1910, when a boyish scrape during a fireworks display at Crystal Palace introduced a working-class kid from North London to the intriguing, worldly gentleman who would take him to the sun-drenched shores of southern Italy.>From idyllic Mediterranean days in Calabria before World War I through the hardships and tensions of Vichy France to the drudgery of England's recovery from World War II and finally the affluence of high-living contemporary London, this evocative novel artfully charts a journey that ends with a perfect - and long-haunting - lunch on the island of Capri.Amazon.com Review
A delightfully inventive ragout of fiction and historical fact, Roger Williams's first novel revolves around a pair of 20th-century icons. There is Norman Douglas, the erudite charmer, gourmet, scoffer, quaffer, and high-spirited pederast, best known as the author of South Wind. And there is Elizabeth David, who transformed Britain's humdrum eating habits in 1950 with the publication of Mediterranean Food. A homage to both of these glorious hedonists, Lunch with Elizabeth David comes in two parts, divided roughly along his-and-hers lines.

The first section details the unsentimental education--classical, culinary, sexual--of one Eric Wolton, a working-class Londoner celebrating his 13th birthday in Naples in 1911. This fictional figure is promptly "ravished by Norman Douglas the length and breadth of Calabria." Man and boy take their pleasures lightly indeed as they voyage across Italy's boot (which Douglas went on to celebrate in Old Calabria). And in later years, Eric, now resigned to a dull policeman's existence, recalls that summer as "the best time in his life." In 1951, however, he is abruptly summoned to the island of Capri, where Douglas and his fashionable entourage--including Harold Acton, Graham Greene, and Gracie Fields--are joining Elizabeth David for a farewell lunch.

In the novel's second part, Williams veers more decisively in the direction of fiction. The scenario goes like this: In the late winter of 1946, Cherry Ingram's mother had waited upon Elizabeth David in a hotel in Ross-on-Wye. (In the novel she is alone; in reality, she was there with a lover, and famously described the food as "produced with a kind of bleak triumph which amounted almost to a hatred of humanity and humanity's needs.") Cut to the late 1980s, which find Cherry delivering a whitefish to a "Mrs. David"--bibulous, overbearing, and suspicious of the finny creature's provenance. This chance encounter leads Cherry into her own past, which turns out to dovetail not only with David's but with that of Norman Douglas and his young paramour.

Williams's novel wonderfully evokes the glories of the Mediterranean, not to mention its multiple pleasures. It is perhaps less successful at splicing Eric and Cherry into the historical canvas: the drama of their lives inevitably pales beside Douglas's high-cholesterol existence, or David's. That said, the good parts are truly delicious and well worth sampling. --Ruthie Petrie ... Read more

Customer Reviews (3)

1-0 out of 5 stars Lunch with blinkers
It is a not uncommon practise for a novel (& we know it is a novel because the cover tells us so) to use real people or events as a basis for fiction. This can be interesting, stimulating, and is perfectly acceptable. Indeed, the real people used can act as either guides for the reader - we pick books mentioning those we are interested in - or a good way of learning about someone we have not come across before.

I presume Elizabeth David was chosen by the author or publisher for the title as the more famous of the two main real characters in this book, although she is less prominent within it: her position as the Great Food Writer who started the now well-known Change to British Food following the second world war made her an important figure in food writing and culture in England and beyond. Her actual appearances in this book are shadowy although significant. Williams has perhaps not read much about her life - among other things, she met and married her husband in Egypt during the war not Europe before it - but his presentation of her role in British food culture is well done.

One supposes that the title Lunch with Norman Douglas would suggest to knowledgeable readers a different sort of story. Douglas did have many opinions on food, some of which are repeated in David's books, but he is these days most noted (or notorious) for his abuse of children. This is delicately presented by Williams in the first section of his book. Douglas takes a poor, uneducated, 12-year-old cockney boy with him to Naples, and we are treated to discriptions of the boy, Eric, learning about the Italian language and food, how to admire the scenery, and to listen to Norman Douglas's stories from classical mytholgy. When we finally reach the scenes in which a grown man takes sexual advantage of a child in his care (the boy's parents are mysteriously useless throughout), we are almost prepared to accept it as part of this education, and part of the special relationship between the allegedly worldly wise 13-year-old Eric, and his Uncle Norman. It is shown to the reader, and Eric, that such relationships with "nephews" are a regular aspect of Douglas' life, and that he has a circle of friends who accept this, although Douglas was forced to leave both the UK and Italy due to his criminal sexual behaviour.

We then get snippets of Eric after he and his "uncle" return to England, the boy dislocated from his family and old friends yet not a real part of Douglas' literary circle, his eventual career in a colonial police service, an unhappy marriage, and a feeling that his time with Douglas was the best part of his life. This representation of Eric's life is staggering - he was happiest when living with the sexually abusive writer - and seemingly accepted by everyone in the novel. Whether or not Eric, who is presented as worldly and assenting to the relationship, viewed himself as being abused, it is unacceptable and not art or literature, but creepy.

The section of the book set in the 1980s, where the influence of Eliabeth David is shown, is less outrageous, although the descriptions of fashionable food of the time are amusing. The belief of the Italian-British family that they are related to Norman Douglas, about whom they know very little is casually investigated, and it is suggested next that they are descended from Eric, and at the end perhaps just that they were aquaintances of some sort - so a big family secret or honour becomes a rumour becomes nothing much at all. The reactions to family members on being told what Douglas was mostly noted for are perhaps suitable for their time, and the general lack of knowledge typical - Norman Douglas was someone who was very big in his day and subsequently, and perhaps deservedly, I have not read his books, sank without a trace. Otherwise, this section seems to demonstrate that even people who like Elizabeth David's cookbooks can be selfish - and indeed, find encouragement in her example - and have bad relationships.

The last luncheon scene - which is the one used to sell the book on its cover - returns to Norman Douglas and Naples after the war. Douglas, Eric, Eric's boring wife, various famous people, and, fashionably late, Elizabeth David are having lunch. There are a couple of young boys in attendance on the 80 something Douglas, and Eric buys one of them an ice cream. The famous pass comment on food and other famous people. David and Douglas are inscruitable about food in front of the others, and we are awed by their behaviour. Someone mentions Eric's childhood relationship with Douglas, which upsets his wife, although Uncle Norman squeezes Eric's thigh at the memory.

At no time is the reader presented with the suggestion that anyone at the table except Eric's wife, who is deeply distressed, sees anything wrong with Norman Douglas' relationships with boys in general or Eric when he was a child in particular - there is a brief discussion about how valuable an inspriation the child Eric was for some of Douglas' writing. What is for this reviewer even more disturbing is that this position is not just acceptable within the boundaries of the novel, but that there is no contradiction anywhere: these are all nice, intelligent, literary, good on food people, so who would fuss about the sexual abuse of a child?

5-0 out of 5 stars Haunting.....
I had read a few of her cook books, and decided to read a biography of Elizabeth David's life (WRITING AT THE KITCHEN TABLE by Artemis Cooper), before I read LUNCH WITH ELIZABETH DAVID. I'm glad I did. Roger Williams probably provides the reader with enough information to make the necessary connections to David's life, but I know my prior reading enhanced my experience. I think I would have profited a bit more if I had read some of Norman Douglas' books before reading LUNCH-at the least "Old Calabria." Fortunately, I had read other authors who'd written about Italy in the "old days" before WWII.

Williams' writing is reminiscent of Nabokov, Durrell-and Elizabeth David. I think his book is very literary in tone and substance, and as is often the case with "classical" works, some of the content is distasteful, although this interpretation is subjective on my part, and not perhaps how Williams sees it. Norman Douglas more frequently than not went about with young boys in tow, and was described by more than one court as a pedophile. I find pedophilia disgusting, but I'm glad I did not follow my first impulse which was to throw the book in the trash bin because it contains more than allusions to this topic.

The main focus of the book is not Douglas, as the book jacket suggests, but the effect he had on other lives. The protagonist in the first section of the book, which takes place mostly before WWI and includes Douglas as a character, is a 12-year old boy from the East End of London named Eric. The main character in the second part of the book, which takes place in 1990s England, is a woman named Cherry whose mother served as maid for Elizabeth David for a short while during WWII. Cherry marries John, Eric's grandson, and a London fish shop owner. Cherry sometimes helps John deliver fish, and eventually develops her own catering business. Food associations lead Cherry to discover Elizabeth David and Norman Douglas.Her discoveries have a profound effect on her life.

LUNCH WITH ELIZABETH DAVID is a hauting book about the long-lasting effects of other people's lives.

4-0 out of 5 stars More about two authors
Roger Williams is mining the degrees of separation between two comparatively unknown British authors, Norman Douglas and Elizabeth David. Williams' strategy is to mix a roman a clef and a dash of mystery-book plotting. Douglas, best known for the cult favorite "South Wind," and David, for cook books/good-eating sensibility before that was a genre unto itself, met before WWII and had a brief friendship. Williams supposes a charming connection between the two that evolves into a fictional contemporary link. This is especially compelling for fans of either of these two writers. ... Read more


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