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$10.80
21. The Odyssey (Penguin Classics)
$2.95
22. Centerburg Tales: More Adventures
 
$38.95
23. The Golfing Machine
24. The Odyssey(Penguin Classics Deluxe
$7.11
25. The Iliad (Penguin Classics)
$49.91
26. Watercolors by Winslow Homer:
27. The Odyssey
$8.98
28. The Iliad (Penguin Classics Deluxe
$9.98
29. Who Killed Homer: The Demise of
$13.44
30. Look long Into The Abyss
$19.20
31. The Odyssey: Books 1-12 (The Loeb
$16.94
32. Winslow Homer Watercolors
$12.20
33. The Devil's Alchemists
$3.89
34. The Keeper's Son (Josh Thurlow
$23.03
35. The Watercolors of Winslow Homer
$6.98
36. The Iliad: The Fitzgerald Translation
37. The Iliad
$19.20
38. The Iliad: Volume II, Books 13-24
39. Homer's Odyssey A Commentary
$1.70
40. The Odyssey (Puffin Classics)

21. The Odyssey (Penguin Classics)
by Homer
Hardcover: 416 Pages (2010-03-10)
list price: US$20.00 -- used & new: US$10.80
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0141192445
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
'I long to reach my home and see the day of my return. It is my never-failing wish'

The epic tale of Odysseus and his ten-year journey home after the Trojan War forms one of the earliest and greatest works of Western literature. Confronted by natural and supernatural threats - shipwrecks, battles, monsters and the implacable enmity of the sea-god Poseidon - Odysseus must test his bravery and native cunning to the full if he is to reach his homeland safely and overcome the obstacles that, even there, await him.

E. V. Rieu's translation of the Odyssey was the very first Penguin Classic to be published, and has itself achieved classic status. For this edition, Rieu's text has been revised, and a new introduction by Peter Jones complements the original introduction. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (69)

1-0 out of 5 stars The Idyssey (Wordsworth Classics
The good news . . . priced at $1.61 plus postage.
The bad news . . . This translation was made in 1616 in good old King James English.I found it almost impossible to read and after a few dozen pages bought another translation done in the 1990's.It was excellent!

Vendor did a good job of quick delivery.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Odyssey
This was a birthday gift for my younger granddaughter. I was very pleased with the item and the shipping. She was delighted to receive the book. I will shop first at Amazon for everything I am wanting to purchase.

5-0 out of 5 stars Fagles Is the Best Translation Available
This review is not a review of the story of Odysseus, but rather a review of Robert Fagles's translation of the Odyssey. Fagles's work in this translation is sparkling. I absolutely love the way he's revived this classic tale.

Let me begin with nuts and bolts. The Penguin Classics version of Fagles's translation is simply a great book to hold in your hand. The book FEELS good. Also, the book has some extras that make it essential. First, Barnard Knox has written an excellent introduction to the text. He explains Homer's cultural and literary context, and he covers the various debates regarding the poem's creation and transmission in a thorough, non-technical manner. Highly recommended reading. Second, the book has some helpful maps of the Greek-speaking lands to help orient the reader. Third, in the back of the book is a pronunciation guide and glossary. Some of these names are a bit strange, so it's helpful to refer to the back sometimes to get some help. Every character and place in the book, no matter how minor, is explained in the back.

In addition to all these benefits, this translation of the text is my absolute favorite. Fagles has produced a verse translation, which preserves the poetic nature of the original. If you're looking for a prose version of Homer, then this book might not be for you (but I'd suggest you give the verse a try). Fagles's main competition for a verse version of the Odyssey is Richard Lattimore's which was published in the 1960s. Some people feel that Lattimore's version is still superior, but I think those people are just being snobby. Lattimore's version is a little more rigid, maybe a little closer to the Greek, but not as poetic and enjoyable.

One of my favorite things about Fagles over Lattimore is that Fagles has abandoned the pretentious adherence to Greek spellings. In Lattimore we read about Athene, Kalypso, Aithiopians, Kronos, and Ithaka, while in Fagles we read about Athena, Calypso, Ethiopians, Cronus, and Ithaca. It's an Enlish translation so translating the names into their traditional English forms makes for a superior reading experience. Also, Fagles has a better ear for English poetry. So he refers to Odysseus as "the man of twists and turns," while Lattimore calls him "the man of many ways." Lattimore is more literal, but he doesn't capture the essence of the Greek meaning or poetic nature as well as Fagles does. One more example from the first page, Lattimore says that those who made it home from the Trojan War "escaped the sea and the fighting." Compare this with Fagles's far more literary "escaped the wars and waves."

Buy this Fagles translation. Read this Falges translation. Love this Fagles translation.

5-0 out of 5 stars Looks nice on a bookshelf, but worth taking down to read
I am a big fan of this new series from Penguin Classics.The hardcover bindings (each featuring a stylized pattern that relates--sometimes subtly, sometimes obviously--with the subject of the book), the high-quality pages, and the ribbon bookmark all make these books attractive collectibles.But I also really enjoyed the content of this book.The prose translation was accurate but not slavish.I felt like I was reading a novel.The introduction was also highly readable and informative--I actually wanted to read it, which is unusual.

5-0 out of 5 stars Could you bend Odysseus' bow?
Fagle's translation of the Odyssey is excellent as is Knox' knowledgeable foreward.During my life, I've read both the Iliad and Odyssey half a dozen times or more, by various translators, and regard Fagle's version as the best.I don't read Greek, ancient or modern, so, like most of us, I am unable to read the subtleties, glory and poetry of the original tales.I rather suspect, however, the Fagle's interpretation gets us close, indeed.

Every time I read the story...at different stages of my life...I read different things into the tale.This times, perhaps, I am more aware of the duplicity that is the very substance of the hero, Odysseus.Lies...complex, detailed lies...flow from his lips as easily and quickly as water poured from a flask.True, his lies usually serve a 'greater' purpose, but they are still lies...a fact of which gives Odysseus no problem.

Since reading the 'Iliad' and 'Odyssey' as a teenager, I've always been partial to the directness and overall simplicity of the 'Iliad.'Believability is also a factor.The Trojan War, some of the characters in it and some of the action details are almost certainly based in reality.The 'Odyssey', far lesss so.It seems to be a collection of out-and-out fables in which Odysseus is the primary player.Still....even fables may have echoes of the truth.Could Odysseus have been away from Ithaca for twenty years and would his wife have remained faithful all this time?Quite possibly.

The story of Odysseus' experiences with the goddesses, Circe and Calypso, are fascinating but, of course, fabulous.They also account for most of the time Odysseus spends on his long path home.This might be a fanciful way of dealing with reality.Odysseus may have been captured on his way home and held as a slave.This reality could definitely 'eat up' years of time but the Circe/Calypso stories are far more interesting and add to Odysseus' reputation as a very accomplished ladies man.Later, although, Odysseus has spent so much time as a virtual sexual slave to the goddesses, he happily recounts the adventures to his wife, Penelope.Penelope isn't offended.Afterall, her husband turned down goddesses and eternal blissful life, in favor of return to his wife of many years.It's one heck of a compliment.

There are a couple of other features that I noted that, again, may be rooted in reality.Twice, Odysseus lies that he is from Crete and that he led an unsuccessful attack on the peoples of the Nile Delta.A number of Egyptian accounts report accounts of attacks by 'The Peoples of the Sea'.Could the Achaean Greeks, in their black ships, have been some, or most, of the Sea Peoples?

Also, the death of Agammemnon, should also be noted.This may also be based on reality.Agammemnon, commander of all Achaean Greek forces against Troy, and King of Achaea's most powerful city, Mycenae, is slain by his wife and her lover.The motive is given as sexual infidelity and greed...greed for the throne of Mycenae.In the Odyssey we learn a fascinating 'detail'.Clytemnestra, Agammemnon's murderous wife, slaughters the slave-captive, Cassandra, on Agammemnon's just-killed body.

Hmmmmmm?Why would Clytemnestra kill a valuable slave?Cassandra, of course, was a Princess of demolished Troy and had been violently raped during the destruction of the city.Nevertheless, it would appear that Clytemnestra hated or feared Cassandra.Why?Probably the oldest reason of all...sexual jealousy.Cassandra's murder suggests that the REAL motive for Agammemnon's killing is quite different than usually represented.He may have preferred the company of Cassandra to that of his queen.Clytemnestra reacted with her well-known violence...a woman jilted.

Also, is it conceivable that the Queen, Penelope, could be held virtual prisoner in her own palace...for years...by 100 or so rampaging suitors?The answer must be 'No' but there are some interesting things to note.Odysseus' father, Laertes, would logically be King, but his son, Odysseus, IS King, which leaves a 20 year vacancy to the throne.We learn that Laertes, mourning over his lost son, lives in rags and poverty as a barely surviving farmer.Possible.Depression and/or mental illness.But why not Odysseus' son, Telemachus?

At the time the first suitors might have 'settled in' to pay court to Penolope and to eat up her wealth, Telemachus would have been underaged.The suitors, who would have become more arrogant and confident, would scarecely have Telemachus the opportunity to claim the throne.Still......it's a far-fetched tale.

Ron Braithwaite, author of novels...'Skull Rack' and 'Hummingbird God'...on the Spanish Conquest of Mexico ... Read more


22. Centerburg Tales: More Adventures of Homer Price
by Robert McCloskey
Paperback: 191 Pages (1977-10-27)
list price: US$6.99 -- used & new: US$2.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 014031072X
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
Further adventures of Homer Price, including those in which a juke box sets the whole town singing against its will and in which a mad scientist develops weeds that overrun the town. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (8)

5-0 out of 5 stars A must read book.
I have loved these stories since my early childhood. In an age of [...]on the TV and movies. These stories will delight children young and old and make you wish you were born back when this stuff was comon place.

5-0 out of 5 stars Homer Price is back...
Centerburg Tales is the second book to hold stories about Homer Price and friends.The first four stories are tales from Grandpa Hercules, an old man known for his tall tales.All of the stories, including the three not told by Hercules, are fun to read, even outloud!Giant ragweeds, 'Eversomuch More-So' (which makes everything better) and a song you just can't stop singing!Good, old fashion, drug free, rocket-ship free, non-violent FUN for most of the family.

"That character," said Freddy after a long silence, "could make some little squirrel very happy."

5-0 out of 5 stars Homer Price redux
This is a great sequel to the original "Homer Price".Homer and his friends are off on more wacky adventures, each one funnier than the last.The final story, in which Homer and his fellow citizens are literally dancing all over town, is one of the most hilarious children's tales ever written.McCloskey had magic in his writing pen and his drawing pencil; it's hard to say which are better, the stories or the illustrations.Suffice to say that they all add up to a wonderful book for young folks.Highly recommended.

5-0 out of 5 stars Tall Tales that Stick with you
The Adventures of Homer Price in the quaint town of Centerburg are flat out hilarious.Homer's uncle Hercules quickly sets the tone of disbelief by spinning some yarns that have just enough "truth" to them to be plausible.This is a truly a story of the American Scene in a time when people entertained themselves by gabbing with one another and singing songs together instead of hiding in the basement watching videos.Good old timey values like hucksterism, lying, and cheating face the good natured community of Centerburg and sometimes turn it upside down.Strange things happen in Centerburg, and the curious Homer Price is going to get to the bottom of it.Robert McClosky is also one of our finest illustrators and his lively drawings add texture and background to the story.Highly Recommeded.

4-0 out of 5 stars Centerburg Rocks
I loved the silly stories of Centerburg as a kid and hoped that my nine-year-old nephew would not find the material too dated to understand.No worries!He laughs out loud at the complicated adventures that ensnare Homer Price and his friends.I'm pleased that he's enjoying a book that enlarges his vocabulary and his ideas about life way back in the mid-twentieth century. ... Read more


23. The Golfing Machine
by Homer Kelley
 Hardcover: 245 Pages (2006-06-15)
list price: US$34.95 -- used & new: US$38.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0932890067
Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
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Customer Reviews (30)

5-0 out of 5 stars This may just change your life if you let it...
Where do I start to sum up the life's work of Homer Kelley? He felt strongly enough about golf to allow his legacy to be spent on the sport. Given he was never an acclaimed professional golfer or writer, every reader should be pleasantly surprised. The concept of taking an everyday activity and dissecting the movements into focused components in terms of limiting variability is unique yet logically simple. He clearly spells out how to read the work and what to get out of each section. This is a great resource in parts and in whole. You easily understand how this can relate to all forms of learning and it really does take a lot of the mystery away from replicating swings and muscle memory. Very enjoyable even at the higher price than Stack and Tilt. I thank those authors for highlighting this reference early in their work. Glad to see Homer's life's work has led many to better golf and perhaps even a higher quality of life. A must read for anyone who wants to problem solve and understand mechanics and motion in more detail. It may even improve your scores. Thanks Mr. Kelley!

2-0 out of 5 stars Not for beginners
This is essentially a catalog of Homer Kelley' observations of the golf swing.It is not an instruction manual.It is not a philosphy of golf.Homer Kelley wrote technical manuals describing the work of others.This book follows that pattern.Mr. Kelley's observations break down the swing into atomistic parts which can remove all fluidity from a golfer's swing.There are thousands of cross references in this book.You won't be able to find some of them.

3-0 out of 5 stars Takes a lot of patience to work through
Kelley claimed this book is a textbook, and is written in the corresponding style.Well, it is somewhat like a textbook, but the organization of the material is needlessly arbitrary, and the keys to productive study are inadequate.However, it contains a report of an exhausitive and insightful study of the golf swing and all realistic variations.I wish one of the Authorized Instructors would write a guide to study.That would be helpful.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Golfing Machine
This is a must read for all golfers with IQ's over 120. Below 120, you're too dumb.If you can think, possibly have a degree, this book will make perfect sense. Read it through, think about how you swing and what works and what doesn't and it makes absolute sense. If you have a very short attention span, possibly adult ADHD, don't bother, you won't be able to focus to "get" this stuff. Homer Kelly was a prodigious thinker and note writer and this was his book. It's been fussed over and "rewritten" to make it a little easier to read but you get the gist of it anyway. Don't let all the jargon and continual referencing of things other than where you're reading bog you down. The message is this: take what you want from this amazing dissertation and you WILL HAVE A MUCH BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF THE PHYSICS OF GOLF THAN YOU EVER DID BEFORE.

3-0 out of 5 stars Chicken Soup For the Common Cold
Generally, before buying a book these days, I look carefully at the one star reviews. These are unlikely to be written by the author or his publisher, and most of the people who genuinely hate a book have some respectable reason (assuming the book is not about politics). For those similarly inclined, I feel an urge to temper the vitriol of the one star reviewers of Mr. Kelley. Yes, it would have been nice if Homer had written the book in English (or at least had it translated), but I suspect that had he done so the book might have been too expensive to self publish and might have been too heavy to lift as well.

All the information a golfer needs to build a perfect swing (indeed a variety of perfect swings) is imbedded this book. Also imbedded in the book is all the information a golfer needs to protect himself from the army of charlatans coming out of the woodwork day by day to offer him the secret to golf for only three easy payments of twenty-nine ninety-five. The problem with The Golfing Machine is that NOBODY can sit down and read it. I have been a golfer for over fifty years and once played well enough to compete both in college and in the championship flight of club events. I will also match reading credentials, as I have been reading what seems like two hundred books a year for the past thirty years and enjoy a law degree from Harvard too. Nearly twenty years ago I stopped practicing law and began studying golf. I have been dipping into the Golfing Machine for nearly that long and believe I very nearly understand it. I have yet to find anything in the book which is wrong, but a great deal of it does seems unnecessary.

The problem with Homer Kelley's writing is that the sentences do not make sense and the paragraphs are often worse. On top of everything else, the book is divided into numbered sections and subsections and at the end of nearly every sentence there is a cross reference to five other places in the text which make no more sense than the sentence and paragraph you have just finished. Reading this book is like reading the Internal Revenue Code, or being the AFLAC duck in a conversation with Yogi Berra, or listening a Who's on First routine that continues for twenty years, except that you do not get the occasional laugh. I should add, however, that a William Gass or Thomas Pynchon novel is far worse than this, so golfers should count their blessings that Kelley was not a post modern academic.

Somehow, a would be reader must ignore all that and try to glean the essence of the author's Ideas, which if they are not exactly clear are occasionally startling and, in so far as I can tell, fundamentally correct. Now, is the book worth the current out of print price tag? I would certainly buy it in preference to another sloppy journalistic rehash published under the name of the latest tour star or television guru, most of whom have no more real idea of the geometry and biomechanics of golf than a squirrel understands mathematics, Newtonian physics or anatomy, although a squirrel can run and jump a good deal better than Isaac Newton ever did. ... Read more


24. The Odyssey(Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)
by Robert Fagles, Homer, Bernard Knox
Kindle Edition: 560 Pages (1997-11-01)
list price: US$16.00
Asin: B000OCXGRS
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
Robert Fagles’s stunning modern-verse translation—available at last in our black-spine classics line

The Odyssey is literature’s grandest evocation of everyman’s journey through life. In the myths and legends that are retold here, renowned translator Robert Fagles has captured the energy and poetry of Homer’s original in a bold, contemporary idiom and given us an Odyssey to read aloud, to savor, and to treasure for its sheer lyrical mastery. This is an Odyssey to delight both the classicist and the general reader, and to captivate a new generation of Homer’s students. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (2)

5-0 out of 5 stars It is the Fagles Translation
I just purchased the Kindle version and it is indeed the Fagles translation and not the Pope translation. Amazon must have corrected their earlier error.

5-0 out of 5 stars A great classic read, even for a high school student
Robert Fagles' translation of The Odyssey puts the text into modern language that makes this book ideal for teaching in a high school English classroom. I read this in my high school English classroom and, contrary to most students my age, enjoyed it immensely. He keeps the flow of Homer's prose while making the text easy to understand.

This is a great book, and as a Kindle owner, I was happy to see it available. I would also like to see The Iliad as translated by Fagles available for the Kindle. ... Read more


25. The Iliad (Penguin Classics)
by Homer
Paperback: 576 Pages (2003-04-29)
list price: US$13.00 -- used & new: US$7.11
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0140447946
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
One of the foremost achievements in Western literature, Homer's Iliad tells the story of the darkest episode of the Trojan War. At its center is Achilles, the greatest warrior-champion of the Greeks, and his conflict with his leader Agamemnon. Interwoven in the tragic sequence of events are powerfully moving descriptions of the ebb and flow of battle, the besieged city of Ilium, the feud between the gods, and the fate of mortals. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (26)

5-0 out of 5 stars Good Book
The book was in the shape the seller said it would be in and it arrieved well before the date

5-0 out of 5 stars My favorite translation (so far)
Last year I bought the Fagles translation of The Iliad without having read a page, simply on the recommendation of others. That was a mistake. It was very hard for me to follow and I could barely understand what was going on. I had to look up older, free translations on the internet to read alongside my book, which was no fun. So after 100 pages or so I gave up.

A few days ago I decided to travel to a few bookstores and do my own Homer translation "shootout." This translation was a clear winner for me on readability, clearness and style. I can't say I'm surprised; I'd read The Odyssey from the same translator and loved it.

4-0 out of 5 stars The Illiad
I really love Homer and Greek Mythology. That being said The Iliad is not my favorite work involving either. I just don't consider it as entertaining or as useful for trying to decipher the riddle of Indo-European religious beliefs and practices as other sources. Its still something you should read if you have an interest in the subject matter and is still a pretty good yarn as far as entertainment value.

5-0 out of 5 stars The bones of civilization
The Iliad by Homer was written about 2500 years ago.It is the story of a long ago war between the Greeks and the Trojans.Unfortunately a lot of attention has always been given to the heroes and battles, while important details of the story are generally ignored.The reasons for the war and the results still affect societies today.When you strip away all the drama and get down to the bones of the story you'll discover some interesting historical details.Helen was not just another beautiful woman; she was also rich, powerful, and independent.According to the story she was heir to the throne of Sparta.She married Menelaus, brother to the king of nearby Mycenae.Menelaus was king of Sparta ONLY because he was married to Helen.Much of his brother's power was based on his alliances with Sparta.When Helen ran off with Paris, prince of Troy, Menelaus had no real claim to the throne, so he had to get Helen back in order to hold political power over Sparta and his brother had to help him for the same reason.By calling her Helen of Troy, the Trojans were actually saying the queen of Sparta was a princess of Troy and therefore Sparta was now a part of their empire.
Troy lost the war and the men were killed.The babies were thrown from the walls of the city and the women and children were taken as slaves.It was the descendants of those who escaped that created Rome.The most tantalizing and untold part of the story is what affect did the Trojan slaves have on the cultural development of ancient Greece?When examining the ruins of Troy today it seems obvious that the Trojans had already advanced greatly in architecture and art and I can't help wondering if the Trojans were part of the great flowering of ancient Greece, just as Romans were a part of the flowering of western civilization.Losing that war caused the Trojan cultural ideals and DNA to be sprinkled across the landscape of our ancestors and that may be one of the things Homer was telling us in this ancient tale.

4-0 out of 5 stars The Horror!!
I picked up a free copy of this book at a Goodwill type free store.I had heard about this classic but never read it--it wasn't required reading at my high school.Even so, I enjoyed it more knowing more about history today than when I was young.Two things make this book interesting, to me at least--one is the courage and fortitude it would take to drive a sword or spear through another human being (face it--it's not like firing a gun); the other is the sincerity they placed in their gods, which was quite comical.Perhaps someday another civilization will laugh at the religions of today as well.Another thought that kept popping into my mind ishow could a blind poet keep a story so complex in his head, and equally amazing, how did this story survive down thru the ages.I thought, as incredible as that fact is alone, it's worth reading just on that basis.And I'm glad I did. ... Read more


26. Watercolors by Winslow Homer: The Color of Light (Art Institute of Chicago)
by Martha Tedeschi, Kristi Dahm
Hardcover: 228 Pages (2008-02-26)
list price: US$45.00 -- used & new: US$49.91
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0300119453
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
American painter Winslow Homer (1836-1910) created some of the most breathtaking and influential watercolours in the history of the medium. This handsome volume provides a comprehensive look at Homer's technical and artistic practice as a watercolourist, and at the experiences that shaped his remarkable development. Focusing on 25 rarely seen watercolours from the Art Institute's collection, along with 75 other related watercolours, gouaches, drawings, and paintings - including many of the artist's characteristic subjects - this book proposes a new understanding of Homer's techniques as they evolved over his career.Accessibly written essays consider each of the featured works in detail, examining the relationship between monochrome drawing and watercolour and the artist's lifelong interest in new optical and colour theories. In particular, they show how his sojourn in England, where he encountered leading British marine watercolourists and the dynamic avant-garde art scene, precipitated an abrupt change in technique and subject matter upon his return home.Conservators address the fragility of these watercolours, which are prone to fading due to light exposure, and demonstrate, through pioneering research on Homer's pigments and computer-assisted imaging, how the works have changed over time. Several of Homer's greatest watercolours are digitally 'restored', providing an exhilarating glimpse of the original impact of Homer's groundbreaking colour experiments. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (13)

5-0 out of 5 stars Great for all Watercolor fans and artists
I absolutely LOVE this book.My watercolor teacher assigned this book as our text for class.I have never seen a book like this ever.They took a microscopic look at Homer's paintings to determine how he did what he did and have done a wonderful job of describing the techniques.While beginning watercolor students would probably need to supplement this text with a more step-by-step book (I favor anything by Michael Crespo) I would rate this book as indespensible for anyone who loves watercolor... and not just the artist, but the viewer as well.Truly, this book is a masterpiece in itself.It's worth every penny they are asking.

5-0 out of 5 stars buy it
I agree with all the good things said about this wonderful book! It is very well printed and the illustrations are beautiful! It is indeed very interesting to read.Only one thing about the graphic design: the coloured titles are the most ugly thing I have ever seen in an artbook, it makes it all so cheap looking. Bad taste!

5-0 out of 5 stars A beautiful book
Watercolours by Winslow Homer: Color of light(Art Institute of Chicago)When I placed my order I had not had the possibility to see the book in advance, so I didn't know what it would be like.First of all I expected to get a book with good colour illustrations about W. Homer's watercolours and of course with some information about the artist, his life and paintings. I was very surprised because not only does the book have good colour illustrations, but also very detailed information about the techniques, types of paper, pigments that W. Homer used in his watercolours and in the different periods of his life. A beautriful book for people who do or simply love watercolours.
Beatrice Vaccari

5-0 out of 5 stars Simply the Best
As a painter and an art educator, I have an abundance of books on paintings, painters and technique.This book beautifully combines all three and somehow transcends every other book on Winslow Homer or professional watercolor technique that I've experienced.Of course, it isn't a primer on watercolor; it is a scholarly, yet very accessible, treatise on the watermedia artwork of one of my two favorite American painters (Sargent being the other).
Besides, the book is gorgeous.The plates are excellent, readily conjuring up both the ruggedness and the lyricism of Homer's technique, as well as the abstraction in the realism, and the metaphor threaded throughout his work.

5-0 out of 5 stars ATerrific Achievement
This is the most interesting, informative and insightful book I've ever read about Homer's artwork and his intense struggle to master color. ... Read more


27. The Odyssey
by Homer
Kindle Edition: Pages (2009-10-04)
list price: US$1.99
Asin: B002RKRSAG
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Editorial Review

Product Description
This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery. ... Read more


28. The Iliad (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition)
by Homer
Paperback: 704 Pages (1998-11-01)
list price: US$17.00 -- used & new: US$8.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0140275363
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
This timeless poem-more than 2,700 year old-still vividly conveys the horror and heroism of men and gods wrestling with towering emotions and battling amid devastation and destruction as it moves inexorably to its wrenching, tragic conclusion. Readers of this epic poem will be gripped by the finely tuned translation and enlightening introduction.

Translated by Robert Fagles
Introduction and Notes by BernardAmazon.com Review
This groundbreaking English version by Robert Fagles is themost important recent translation of Homer's great epic poem. Theverse translation has been hailed by scholars as the new standard,providing an Iliad that delights modern sensibility andaesthetic without sacrificing the grandeur and particular genius ofHomer's own style and language. The Iliad is one of the twogreat epics of Homer, and is typically described as one of thegreatest war stories of all time, but to say the Iliad is a warstory does not begin to describe the emotional sweep of its action andcharacters: Achilles, Helen, Hector, and other heroes of Greek mythand history in the tenth and final year of the Greek siege of Troy. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (151)

5-0 out of 5 stars A sonnet review (from All-Consuming Books)
"Achilles doesn't gladly suffer fools,
and Agamemnon's foolishness is shown
when he takes away Briseis and rules
proudly, claiming war prizes for his own
which should, by rights, belong to other men
(the slavery issue never gets addressed)
but this king of all the Greeks is brought low when
Achilles boycotts battle. Since their best
and boldest fighter's sitting out, the Greeks
are getting hacked to bits by Hector, who's
just fighting for his home, but then Zeus speaks,
and brings down Trojan doom: they're going to lose.
The Greeks march ahead with inexorable forces
and Troy buries Hector, the breaker of horses."

Here we have the story of the fall of Troy at the hands of the Greeks, though The Iliad actually ends before the fall of Troy, the Trojan Horse comes along in a later book, The Odyssey, and the Greeks are usually called Achaeans or Argives (I think what they're called at any given point has something to do with Homer's metrics and how many syllables his lines needed). The half-god warrior Achilles is the central figure of the story and the action is driven as much by his decisions as it is by the whims of the gods, who take sides in the war and vigorously defend their favorite champions. Achilles meets his opposite in Hector, prince of Troy, who is a family man fighting to defend his own home city, while Achilles is in it for the glory and is fighting for a man he hates. Hector kills Achilles' friend Patroclus, Achilles kills Hector in retaliation, and the war-cycle spirals downward and gets uglier with each passing skirmish.

Some themes:

Rage: The Iliad is called the epic of menis, rage, the first chapter is titled "The Wrath of Achilles," and the first (and best) line in the whole epic is, "Rage--Goddess, sing the rage of Peleus' son Achilles." This killing-anger isn't something the characters can escape from for any length of time. Rage can be hidden, but it always eventually bursts forth again--Achilles even nurtures the feeling. He's furious and refuses to fight for the Achaeans, and then when they bring him presents to appease him, he ain't want to be appeased! Cooler heads don't seem to prevail, here, and the epidemic of rage ensures that The Iliad is endlessly violent and gory--except for Hector's body, which is preserved from decay by the gods, the other casualties of war either get thrown onto pyres or become food for the vultures.

Vengeance. An eye for an eye, ad infinitum. Humans love seeking vengeance, like Achilles avenging Patroclus by killing Hector, but the gods are fond of it, too. The gods are big on damage control--they might not be able to stop you from doing something disastrous, but they'll certainly punish you for it after the fact, like Apollo visiting the Achaeans with a plague after they kidnap Chryseis, the daughter of his priest.

Doom. Not just fate, but negative fate. Doom hangs over all of Troy and over most of the Achaens that the reader might actually care about: though Achilles is a killing machine, it's possible to empathize with him, and the propheices make it clear that he's going to die at Troy; Odysseus is going to live through the war, but it'll be another long decade before he gets home; Agamemnon is going to be murdered by his wife's boyfriend when he gets home (but since he's a power-hungry tyrant who killed his own daughter, it's not such a loss), and Menelaus is going to regain Helen and go home, but you can't say they'll live at all happily. So, really, doom all around. And it's not just for the characters in the story--there's an overarching idea that war is an inescapable part of humanity's existence, a point on a circle we'll always cycle back to.

Some characters:

Women: Overall, we don't come off looking very good in The Iliad. The gods are fussy enough at the best of times, but in the Olympus scenes, Hera and Athena are usually going all Lady Macbeth in the background, demanding blood and nudging Zeus to destory the Trojans. As far as mortal women go, you could argue that they're extremely important since all the major conflicts, both national and interpersonal, seem to be fought over them. But unfortunately, women like Helen and Briseis are status objects--they aren't so much desirable for themselves as for the power they represent. Any female may be exchanged for another female of equal or greater value, and the only ladies with real worth are those who happen to be cherished by their husbands and sons, like Achilles' mom, Thetis, and Hector's wife, Andromache.

Agamemnon: Not counting the capricious gods, he's the closest thing this epic has to an outright villain. He heads up the war, attcks the wrong places (Apollo's temple) disses the wrong people (Achilles) and demands honor regardless of whether he's earned it. He doesn't respect gods or men, and definitely doesn't respect women--he's thrilled at the prospect of Chryseis slaving away for him until she dies. He snarls, gloats, whines, and threatens, and is basically the antithesis of what a leader should be.

Achilles: It's no surprise that he's destined to burn out and die young, because he's so suited to carnage, you can't imagine him existing outside the world of war--he's a very politically incorrect central character. If you don't respect martial prowess, you can't admire him at all. Brains, leadership, sacrifice--all the attendant virtues associated with warriors aren't a particularly big part of his characterization. He's not much of a strategist; that's Odysseus. He's the respected leader of the Myrmidons, but he's not necessarily 100% dedicated to them, and if his ire is roused, he'll stay in his tent while they go out and fight. His biggest "noble" sacrifices are allowing Patroclus to fight in his place and giving King Priam his son's corpse back after he's dragged it around behind his chariot for a few days. Achilles is not going to win any awards for heroism because he's really only good at one thing: killing lots and lots of people. And, well, he also loves his mother, so there's that to be considered.

Notes on this edition: Fagles' preface to this translation is enlightening and reveals his love for the work he's dealing with, which is always exciting to see. When the translator has a real passion for the original material and an equal dedication to delivering it to a modern audience in an understandable, accessible way, it's getting at the heart of why we translate great works at all, and why some works should be preserved in any language. This version maintains a swift pace, and the connections to oral tradition mean that even in an English translation, some of the lines beg to be read aloud. I really love this epic, and have for ten years. Gratuitious violence, pouting protagonist, downer ending and all, it has a deep and lasting literary beauty that makes it hard to forget.

4-0 out of 5 stars Quality Purchase
Fast delivery and book was in great quality! I would definitely purchase from this seller again.

5-0 out of 5 stars A classic all should read
The Iliad and then the Odyssey are two of my favorite Greek Epics.Beautiful stories, themes, and imagination fill this book and the Odyssey.

3-0 out of 5 stars Fantastic book but don't buy Kindle edition.
This is one of the best pieces of literature ever produced in the history of human civilization so I feel slightly uncomfortable giving it anything less than five stars.That said, the Kindle version of this book has several problems.Words are misspelled throughout the text and the footnote numbers are not listed in the text.I read the entire poem on the Kindle before I arrived at the end of the book and found out that footnotes and reading notes do exist.Their referring numbers are not listed in the body of the text, however.

Buy this, read it, and keep it for life, but just don't get the Kindle version.

One star for Kindle version, five for the book.

4-0 out of 5 stars 4 stars for the translation, 3 for the story
4 stars for the translation, which I selected after careful consideration (and looking through several of the most well-respected translations from the library), 3 stars for the actual text. I feel that this is the best of both worlds for a work like this: accessible to a modern audience, yet remaining fairly faithful to the text and keeping an epic-sounding tone. Other translations either erred on the side of being too literal, with clunky or high-handed phrasing, or on the side of watering the text down. The book is handsome if hefty, with maps, glossary, bibliography, and a lengthy, helpful introduction by respected classicist scholar Bernard Knox. The intro might seem too academic for some, but for a fuller understanding of the text, I think it is worth the time.

Then again, I'm a bit of a nerdy scholar myself, and would also recommend Moses Finley's The World of Odysseus to prepare for reading either The Iliad or The Odyssey. Knox also provides the intro for Fagles' translation of The Odyssey, which I've moved onto next. The Iliad itself was not as enjoyable for me. While I am glad I read it because it is such an important piece of classical literature, it is repetitious and meticulous in details that, for the modern reader, are perhaps not as interesting as they might have been for the ancient listener, who heard these tales told or sung aloud. The scenes of battle between the Achaeans (as they are called, rather than Greeks--Greece as a unified entity did not exist at the time this was supposed to have taken place) and the Trojans, which comprise most of the text, are the most boring part. Instead of being fast-paced entertainment, we get warriors stopping to spout off their lineage and accomplishments before cutting one another down, or warriors complaining about or insulting other warriors (either those on their same side or on the other).

The characters are also largely unsympathetic: Achilles, most skilled of all, is a petulant brat; Agamemnon, leader of the Achaeans, is a huffy, pretentious egomaniac; and Paris, the guy who started this whole war, is a sniveling pretty boy who doesn't even display much tenderness towards Helen. Only some of the Trojans are sympathetic: King Priam beset by the stress of the war; his son, Hector, courageous and loyal, who gets the only convincingly human scene in the whole text when he bids his wife and infant son farewell (though when he finally confronts Achilles, we get a ridiculous, Benny Hill-like scene of Achilles chasing him around the wall of Troy several times). Even Helen, in her brief appearance, I feel sorry for, since, disgusted with the bloodshed she has instigated, she tries to go back to her husband.

Which reminds me, the gods are also in bad form here, as petty and careless as usual. Although Athena, as usual, displays her nobility and power--even defeating Ares in battle--her unequivocal defense of the Achaeans, due to being insulted by Paris, seems narrow-minded. There are two interesting scenes in which mortals actually talk on the gods--Diomedes, driven into battle fury by Athena, and Achilles, when he confronts the river god Xanthus after clogging the river with Trojan bodies. Overall, though, the text tended to drag, and the only thing that kept me going was that it was considered one of the greatest pieces of world literature. ... Read more


29. Who Killed Homer: The Demise of Classical Education and the Recovery of Greek Wisdom
by Victor Davis Hanson, John Heath
Paperback: 323 Pages (2001-04-01)
list price: US$17.95 -- used & new: US$9.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1893554260
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description

With straightforward advice and informative readings of the great Greek texts, the authors show how we might still save classics and the Greeks for future generations. Who Killed Homer? is must reading for anyone who agrees that knowledge of classics acquaints us with the beauty and perils of our own culture.
Amazon.com Review
The answer to the attention-grabbing question posed byclassicists Victor Davis Hanson and John Heath in the title of thispassionate defense of their field (which is also a damnation of theiracademic colleagues) is not a pretty one. "It was," theyadmit sadly, "an inside job."

Why, at the end of the20th century, should we give a hoot in the first place about a brutal,misogynist society that rose to greatness on the back of slaves?Because, they argue, it was the first place; for all the faultsof ancient Greece, the seeds of what Western civilization is todaywere planted there. "What we mean by Greek wisdom," theyexplain, "is that at the very beginning of Western culture theGreeks provided a blueprint for an ordered and humane society thatcould transcend time and space, one whose spirit and core values couldevolve, sustain, and drive political reform and social change for ageshence."

But Hanson and Heath are not content to simply make afiery, articulate case for what's right about understandingthis particular ancient civilization in a contemporary world wheremore and more non-Western societies openly seek to embrace thedemocratic spirit. They go on to launch a deliciously vituperativejeremiad on what's wrong with the priorities of those entrustedwith passing on this wisdom. Classics departments, as portrayed inWho Killed Homer?, appear to be filled with politicallycorrect, insecure footnote fawners who, steeped in minutiae, miss theBig Picture. Hanson and Heath have a plan, sure to raise the hacklesof tenured professors, for reviving classical studies that emphasizesthe importance of teaching, communicating, and popularizing overpublishing arcane monographs in journals not even the writer's familywill ever read, insisting that the alternative--the extinction of avivid intellectual pursuit--borders on cultural suicide. --JeffSilverman ... Read more

Customer Reviews (45)

3-0 out of 5 stars Well, 3.5 stars
Just a couple of thoughts after many long reviews: The prose is too cute and verbose. These are intelligent men, so I assume they picked this style on purpose. Too often I felt they continued to bludgeon a corpse with their gritted-teeth humor.

The middle section, about who did the killing of Homer, was not nearly as interesting as the beginning and end (which are more about the Greeks). Write something inciting and enticing and student will come to it, demanding something of value. Whine over your colleagues, and you may drive some away. Pair the two ends together for the general populace, saving the bombast for your silly peers, and would be a worthwhile book.

So, do read this book, but don't regret skipping over the answer to the question the title poses.

3-0 out of 5 stars An Incomplete Odyssey
Rarely have I encountered a book wherein the answer to a question posed by its rhetorical -- but well-intended and no doubt provocative -- title is so obvious. Merely reading the cover jacket will inform a potential reader who "killed" the ancient Greek poet; one needn't slog through over three hundred pages to solve this mystery. Furthermore, the questioning title assumes a fact I wholeheartedly reject: that Homer is "dead" -- a concept (as it must be) that the authors never actually define beyond his near-disappearance from the collegiate curriculum.

To that end, I doubt it'd be giving away much to tell you that -- according to Hanson and Heath -- Homer's killing took place in that nest of vipers itself, the modern university. Being professors they cover this familiar territory quite well, recounting seemingly every folio of recent classics scholarship that wouldn't be out of place in a Woody Allen spoof: everything from "feminine subjectivity in the Odyssey" to the homoerotic breakdown between Achilles and Patroclus. The authors go further and posit solid reasons for this tawdry state of affairs, and while their culprits -- academic infighting and privilege, multiculturalism, subjective historicism, devaluation of the humanities -- are not terribly surprising they still benefit from a fresh airing, especially in this context. The introduction itself describes a sordid little tale of how their initial paperback publisher balked at its *own printing* at the last minute, apparently strong-armed by a clutch of academics whose delicacies were bruised in the first edition. On more than one occasion, I got the impression the authors -- both in writing this book and toiling within their respective classics departments -- were characters in their own Greek tragedy.

And perhaps that was at least partly their intention, for when they arrive at remedies Hanson and Heath fall back on Greek wisdom itself. Reviving the study of Homer by "thinking like a Greek" and having professors actually *model their behavior* by centuries-old standards might seem a quaint piece of overreach. But the authors appear quite serious, and given their intricate detailing of the university's suffering due to the loss of Greek wisdom they have little choice but to recommend harsh remedies. I was rather disappointed they didn't consider more pragmatic alternatives, from both the "demand" (e.g., introducing the epics to a younger audience) and "supply" (suggesting more wholesale university reform) sides. I understand that college is their turf -- but I wish they betrayed more knowledge that it's not the *only* turf.

A few other pitfalls tarnish the author's case. Organization is not a strong suit: five languid chapters read like extended (albeit interesting) essays and one is even entitled "Who Killed Homer - and Why". (Isn't that the name of the book?) Curiously missing among the chapters, however, is a more serious omission: any *consequences* of Homer's "death". (Wholesale elimination of Classics departments? The final death knell of classical wisdom? A new dark ages?) I'm aware this comes perilously close to reviewing a book the authors *didn't* write -- but given the dramatic problems and remedies discussed, this seemed an especially curious oversight.

But "Who Killed Homer?" is still worthwhile reading for both its withering indictment of university practices and detailing of the cavalcade of rude jokes that now pass for classics scholarship. Its bibliography and suggestions for "when all we can do is read" are also more than welcome and might even inspire a healthy number of non-students to tackle the Greeks (and Romans). In fact, if enough readers outside the ivory towers surmount the tasks of understanding classics and even applying their teaching to their lives -- another topic Hanson and Heath consider far too briefly -- their demise at universities might just be nothing more than another nail in that overpriced, coddled, and increasingly irrelevant coffin.

5-0 out of 5 stars Who Killed Homer? It Was an Inside Job
In WHO KILLED HOMER, Victor Davis Hanson and John Heath address the pressing issue of the rapid demise and death of classical Greek learning in the west. At the time of its publishing (2001), the dire straits that Greek thought and culture found itself in have not improved a whit. If anything, the trend is toward a total obliteration of the very foundation of western civilization.Hanson and Heath have plenty of blame to lay and fingers to point, but the bulk of their ire is surprisingly enough directed at their colleagues, all of whom were charged with keeping the immortal spark of classical learning alive. They are especially angry when their colleagues insist that there is nothing wrong at all with their profession.Such misguided academics most often point to the geometric increase in scholarly articles published and conferences attended.And that, Hanson and Heath insist, is precisely the point.The scholarly articles are written in the most opaque jargon-ridden prose imaginable with no one reading them. The conferences are attended mostly by senior tenured professors of Greek and Latin who hand over their few teaching duties to underpaid and overworked teaching assistants who can only dream of the day when they too will be able to enter the sheltered life of a tenured academic when they know only too well that with the shrinking pool of college students who choose classics as a major that that scenario is very likely not to occur.And it is not simply laziness or cupidity that has caused today's teachers of classics to abandon the very barricades that were their responsibilities to maintain.Much of the problem they see as a changing mindset in the very viability and desirability of thinking like the ancient Greeks. Hanson and Heath charge modern modes of thought like post-modernism, cynicism, nihilism, and skepticism as the collective root cause in subverting a two thousand year tradition in the belief of Eternal Truths like beauty, justice, and patriotism into a witches' brew of deconstructive thought that insists that there is no solid linguistic, cultural, or historical groundfloor under our feet.All that we used to call Traditional Values are now to be seen as slipping and sliding in ways that suggest that there was nothing special or enduring about the ancient Greeks at all. They note that it is trendy for cultural relativists to insist that all cultures in all ages are equally viable and worthy of emulation. If so, then why study classics in the first place.The answer, Heath and Hanson insist, is that the relativists are wrong.When Homer was writing his ILLIAD, there was nothing like Greek ideals of polis or thought available anywhere else in the world. This, of course, does not sit well with those who decry the United States as the primary source of all the world's evil.Those who claim that are also the same ones who deny Greece as the initial and irreplaceable source of current western concepts like egalitarianism, property rights, and religious tolerance.

As bad as things are, Hanson and Heath do not think them hopeless. In their concluding chapter, "What We Could Do," they list alternatives to the dissolution of their profession. Among them:
1) Re-introduce the classics into high school and college curriculums
2) Have senior tenured classics professors attend fewer conferences and teach more undergraduate classes
3) Reduce the time to complete a Phd in classics to five years or less
4) Scrap the traditional doctoral dissertation in favor of several broad papers of Greek culture
5) Give tenure only to those who teach a lot rather than publish a lot
6) Re-acquire the belief that the Greeks were a special people who have a great deal to say that is relevant today.

On the down side, both Hanson and Heath do not believe that any of their suggestions will be implemented anytime soon. As a result, when future Greek classes will be attended only by the doddering senior professors who will preside over a legion of empty seats, then it will be evident even to these soon to be retired professors that their profession has already gone the way of the dodo.

5-0 out of 5 stars True -- I have been there
If I had the money, I would give financial aid to any entering graduate student in the field of Classics who read and discussed this book.My only regret about WKH? is that it escaped my notice for ten years.As I told my wife, I felt that the book had been written about my own experience, or that I had actually written it myself.On almost every page it now has numerous highlights and many margin notes, some as simple as "Amen!"

The authors make a strong, clear case for the value of Greek and Roman thought in the modern age.Along the way they make much deserved attacks on the academic institution of America's institutions, with its obscure and pointless writings, emphasis on fringe issues, general failure to embody the values of what it claims to teach.I can agree wholeheartedly with almost everything the authors say because I have been there.The issues they attack, and even some of the very professors whom they charge with dereliction of academic duty, served to end my own pursuit of a Ph.D. in Classics some years ago thanks to their focus on things that did not truly matter.

If you want an encomium of Greco-Roman learning, if you want solid reasons why the Greeks and Romans matter very much today, this book is required reading.If you want to know what really goes on in higher education, whether before sending your own child off to study or whether deciding if you want to go yourself, then you must read WKH?.For once I am keeping the review short.You don't need to read me, you need to read Who Killed Homer?.

4-0 out of 5 stars Important to understand
It is important for all Americans to understand from which ancient cultures this country was ultimately formed. The government we live under, our way of life, our views about things good and bad were ultimately the result of Greek thinking. Not Chinese, not Persian, but Greek and to some extent Hebrew. In this age history is devalued to the point where it seems we don't even wish to understand our origins. Certainly other cultures have contributed to the American miracle but we MUST understand the Greeks and Romans in order to understand where we have been and where we are going. The picture these two authors paint of the Greeks isn't always a cheery one. They made mistakes, a lot of them, but since our nature was their nature we need to understand them in order to avoid their mistakes. That's really all the authors are saying. ... Read more


30. Look long Into The Abyss
by A. R. Homer
Paperback: 290 Pages (2010-07-12)
list price: US$14.95 -- used & new: US$13.44
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1605945315
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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The Third Reich is collapsing.The rules have changed.There are no rules.   Nazi Germany, 1945. Hitler Youth on suicide missions...old men hanged for desertion ...marauding slave laborers...homeless Germans clogging roads...and looted art hidden everywhere.

As Hitler's Germany thrashes in its death throes, Lt. Gina Cortazzo follows close behind the American front to rescue art stolen by the Nazis.Her success awaits the capture of Alt Aussee, the salt mine where the thousands of stolen masterpieces in Hitler's private collection are hidden.

But SS Brigadeführer Reinhard Hofmann is also heading there with his crack forces, on his way to establish a final fortress where Nazism can hold out.And he is ready to carry out the Führer's final order: destroy the entire collection, should it be in danger of falling into enemy hands.

Look Long into the Abyss paints a chilling and vivid picture of the last days of World War II.The cast of characters includes Sgt. Bill Terrill, who saves Gina's life as they cross paths with suicidal Hitlerjugend; Frieda, the mother of a Hitler Youth fighting with Hofmann; Stanislaus, the Polish slave laborer with whom Frieda and her daughter form an unlikely alliance; and Father Hieronymus, the abbot whose monastery harbors more than one dangerous secret.

Throughout the chaos, Raphael's Portrait of a Young Man weaves a spell. Thieved from thieves, lost then found, the priceless work alters the lives of Frieda, Stanislaus, and Gina...and others caught in the maelstrom. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (8)

5-0 out of 5 stars Beautifully crafted work that kept me in suspense
In the spring of 1945, as the war shudders to a close in Europe, feisty American Lieutenant Gina Cortazzo has landed her dream job.Despite a blue-collar background, her research has brought her prominence in the art world, and she now follows the American front line as one of the "Monuments Men" to rescue art stolen and hidden by the Nazis.Setting her sights on Hitler's immense private trove of looted art, she waits for the Americans to capture the salt mine where it is hidden - and where a very nasty surprise awaits them all.

Meanwhile, the world becomes an even more terrifying place for Frieda, a German widow, whose husband was executed for his role in the Hitler assassination plot.Now, she seeks to escape again as her son, Wolfgang, marches off to join his Hitler Youth troop and as stateless ruffians invade her home.

Several larger-than-life characters appear on the stage of this thrilling tale - Eisenhower, Patton, Bradley, Hitler.But even more memorable are Homer's portraits of people who never made it to the history books: the unfortunates whose lives the war has torn to shreds.Sergeant Bill Terrill, Gina's driver who once watched as his best friend was reduced to guts hanging from a tree by an 88 shell, wants only two things: to keep Gina safe and to go home. Stanislaus, an escaped forced laborer from Poland, finds the open road a dangerous place and takes shelter in a monastery where he makes an amazing discovery that puts him, as well as a number of others, in grave danger.Trudi, Frieda's young daughter, her world brutalized by the war, gives voice to her deepest feelings through Clothilde, her doll.And, my favorite character, Father Hieronymus, his monastery like a tranquil island in a storm-whipped sea, works in mysterious ways his wonders to perform.

And then there are the small-time thugs who harass them and the big-time fanatics whose misguided loyalties and private agendas drive them and all of Germany to the edge of Armageddon.Count von Schellendorf, who has amassed a fortune in illegally-acquired art, hides his prize piece in a place no one will ever find it - until someone unexpectedly does.Gestapo chief Emil Gruber is desperate to steal back something he stole from another Nazi, then lost.And SS commander Hofmann makes a pledge to his Fuehrer that has the power to horrify even those who know the outcome of the war.

This novel, the latest in Homer's `novels of war and love' series, is a beautifully-crafted work that kept me in suspense - and often on the edge of my chair - and also frequently warmed my heart.LOOK LONG INTO THE ABYSS is a splendid addition to the genre of fine World War Two historical fiction.

4-0 out of 5 stars A Very Good Story
I own all of Mr.Homer's books and have enjoyed every one.This was a very good story, but I thought the US Military frowned on fraternization between the officers and enlisted so was a bit suprised at the very chummy relationship between the lieutenant and her enlisted driver and the speed at which it developed. Towards the end of the book when the German woman and her child are escaping, I have never encountered a stream that could be crossed by "stepping stones" yet was deep enough to drown in.Seems that wouldbe more like stepping boulders.And at a very exciting, tension-filled time in the story I found myself laughing out loud at a line that stated the man's hat fell off and "ran down the stream".

But I am giving it four stars as it was very enjoyable story, historically accurate, packed with factual information, yet easy to read.Just maybe needed a little more editing.

5-0 out of 5 stars Love Will Not Be Denied
If you are interested in stories filled with suspenseful intrigue, fascinating characters, and historical drama, Look Long into the Abyss is for you.
Set at the tail end of the war in Europe, we follow two couples as they race against the clock.
Frieda, a German war widow, and Stanislaus, an escaped Polish slave laborer, are thrown together by happenstance.As they travel the German countryside to escape the violent human remnants of the Third Reich, they develop a bond forged by mutual acts of kindness.
The second couple, Americans attached to Arts and Monuments, are Gina, an art historian, and Bill, her working class G.I. Joe driver.The two follow the American army to retrieve stolen artworks before they are lost forever amidst the chaos of war.Their story is one of class difference and male/female roles.Never one to engage in stereotypical war characters, A. R. Homer presents the reader with a fresh approach to the time-honored literary question:How do man and woman overcome their prejudices to find love built on a foundation of respect for the other person?
When it comes to stitching together intersecting plot lines, A. R. Homer displays the skills of a master surgeon.He deftly weaves both love stories as they meet in a powerful climactic ending that is sure to satisfy even the most demanding reader.
This novel is another feather in the cap for one of the finest historical fiction writers on the scene today.If you like this book, be sure to check out other titles by this author.I particularly enjoy his consistent ability to capture human relationships set against the backdrop of chaotic circumstances without resorting to plot contrivances or striking false notes.This is a rare talent indeed.

5-0 out of 5 stars An historically accurate view of the profits of war.
The historical , in depth, study of the WW2 era is A.R.Homer's lifes work. He not only has his facts straight on but his insight and abilities to relate the emotions and motivations of the characters involved is amazing. As a child, I grew up during the early days of the war, heard my uncles and family friends relate there personal experiences. Many had brought home with them a little "momento" of their time spent in the conflict. Mr. Homer's book shines the light of truth on just how big a "momento" Hitler and his stooges wanted to have in their collections. The cost for such greed in human lives and the loss of the true "treasures" of our civilization is shockingly revealed.
As in all of A.R. Homer's works, the very realistic incorporation of believable human characters and love is ever present. This is not a dry historic rehash of facts and dates. History becomes alive and personal. I found a lot of myself here as you will also.

4-0 out of 5 stars "Look Long Into the Abyss"
The book is well written, exciting, and entertaining. Well worth reading. Although classified as fiction, it is based on historical facts. ... Read more


31. The Odyssey: Books 1-12 (The Loeb Classical Library, No 104)
by Homer
Hardcover: 496 Pages (1995)
list price: US$24.00 -- used & new: US$19.20
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0674995619
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description

Here is a new Loeb Classical Library edition of the resplendent epic tale of Odysseus's long journey home from the Trojan War and the legendary temptations, delays, and perils he faced at every turn. Homer's classic poem features Odysseus's encounters with the beautiful nymph Calypso; the queenly but wily Circe; the Lotus-eaters, who fed his men their memory-stealing drug; the man-eating, one-eyed Cyclops; the Laestrygonian giants; the souls of the dead in Hades; the beguiling Sirens; the treacherous Scylla and Charybdis. Here, too, is the hero's faithful wife, Penelope, weaving a shroud by day and unraveling it by night, in order to thwart the numerous suitors attempting to take Odysseus's place.

The works attributed to Homer include the two oldest and greatest European epic poems, the Odyssey and Iliad. These texts have long stood in the Loeb Classical Library with a faithful and literate prose translation by A. T. Murray. George Dimock now brings the Loeb's Odyssey up to date, with a rendering that retains Murray's admirable style but is worded for today's readers. The two-volume edition includes a new introduction, notes, and index.

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Customer Reviews (4)

5-0 out of 5 stars Buyer beware of the "used" and "new" secondary market sellers
Murray's translation of the Odyssey was issued in 1919 and several times since.

Dimock's was issued in 1995 (2nd edition).

Dimock's was re-printed "with corrections" in 1998.

If the best text of this version is important to you for scholarship, you want the latest, "corrected" version, not an out-dated second-hand book or a library discard.

I have no opinion on the quality of Greek or the usefulness of the translation for academic purposes, and defer to the other reviewers.

On snobbishness: the Classics Libraries with which I am familiar (at two universities) are chock-full of Loeb and proudly so, it seems. Yale Bookstore stocks them, so they have overcome their rivalry that much. No good reason to be a snob about Loeb--especially if you have little Latin and less Greek.

5-0 out of 5 stars Loeb always a classic
Dimock's revision of Murray's translation has updated the text so that it seems a little less archaic.However, as an aid for translation of the Greek, the line by line literal translations have no equals.
Excellent for those learning, or relearning, reading Homeric Greek in the "original"

5-0 out of 5 stars An Indispensable Aid for Greek Students
Talking to other students of Greek, I'm fascinated by the ambivalence they feel for the Loeb series. For some, to read a Greek text in a Loeb edition is an act of sacrilege for which burning at the stake is not sufficient punishment. According to these Greek students, one should have only the Greek text furnished with an appropriately massive critical apparatus. Amusingly, the one person I know who is most vociferously against the Loeb series was quite upset when, a few months ago, I ran into him at a university bookstore and found, horror of horrors, that he was purchasing a Loeb. Needless to say, I have no such prejudice against the Loeb series and find certain volumes to be quite helpful in learning Greek.

Unfortunately, many of the translations that come alongside the Greek texts in the Loeb series are not particulalry faithful to the original text and are therefore useless if one is looking for a simple crib to help construe the meaning of this or that word or construction.

Fortunately, the translation for the Loeb edition of the Odyssey is a great crib. It is, for the most part, painstakingly faithful to the Greek, although there are a few strange lapses here and there where the translator(s) have decided to add a few words that are not in the Greek.

As for those who are Greekless and are simply looking for an accurate translation of the Odyssey, I'm not sure that I can recommend the translation. On the one hand, it is faithful to the sense of the text, but capture none of the sensuality of the text; that is to say, the rhythm and sound that make Homer so pleasurable are not reproduced in the translation. So, the translation is an excellent crib for construing the sense of Homer's text, but that's the extent of its merit.

5-0 out of 5 stars A dated translation; a work that never ages
Every generation must have its own translations of Homer, but a good place for an aspiring translator to start will always be the Loeb library: translations facing the original Greek, a reasonable price, a cover design that doesn't try to look especially modern. Of course, if you're just looking to read Homer in English, there are better translations (my own personal favorite is Fagles). ... Read more


32. Winslow Homer Watercolors
by Ms. Helen A. Cooper
Paperback: 260 Pages (1987-09-10)
list price: US$39.95 -- used & new: US$16.94
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0300039972
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Customer Reviews (9)

2-0 out of 5 stars not what i hoped for
I received the book in a timely manner, and the dealer is reliable.
My problem was that I thought it was a coffee table book with Homer Winslows paintings. It wasn't, the pictures were small and not as many as I had anticipated. However, I take full blame for not getting what I had in mind, because it was my mistake.

5-0 out of 5 stars timeless watercolors
I am happy with my purchase of Winslow Homer Watercolors. It includes 223 finely reproduced watercolors done by Homer over the course of his lifetime (most in full color). It is divided up into the various areas he either lived in or traveled to when he did his paintings. The commentary about his work is both interesting and readable.Homer is both a fine draftsman and watercolourist.

5-0 out of 5 stars Martha's Review
I am very pleased with the book of watercolors. There were numerous pictures of high quality, and covered different phases of his life.

5-0 out of 5 stars An excellent book
This book provides a great analysis of Winslow Homer's growth as an artist.The author uses each chapter to analyze a different period of Homer's life as he, basically, self-taught himself through observation and experimentation based on where he lived, whether it was in the Bahamas, England, or the Northeast Atlantic coast of the United States. The pictures within the book are very good quality.The author emphasizes analysis of Homer's work over actual biographical information.If you are looking for more of a biographical-type book of Homer read Lloyd Goodrich's book Winslow Homer.Enjoy!

5-0 out of 5 stars In Awe of Homer
Since seeing a show of Winslow Homer's works a few years ago, I have been in awe of this artist's talent and versatility. So it was natural for me to pick up this beautifuland informative book which focuses on his watercolor career. In addition, the author gives us Homer's earlier background as an oil painter and illustrator. She is certainly well-qualified to write about Homer---she holds the position of Curator of American Paintings and Sculpture at the Yale University Art Gallery.

The color plates in this book are gorgeous and the text gives good information about Homer, his life, times, and techniques. It was a delight for my eyes!

In 1873, at the age of 37, Homer began serious work with watercolor while in Gloucester, Massachusetts. These paintings were characterized by broad brushstrokes and extensive use of light and color.

The Gloucester watercolors began Homer's lifelong pattern: he would focus for a certain amount of time on a singular theme inspired by a particular location.Some of these themes included rural life, especially childhood, and seascapes/marine scenes. He lived for periods of time in Gloucester; Cullercoats, England; Prout's Neck, Maine; the Bahamas and Cuba;, the Adirondacks; Quebec; Bermuda; and Florida. His need for privacy led him to live in somewhat remote locations, and during these years he was constantly experimenting with new techniques. Prout's Neck was his home base for his last 30 years although he often spent time in other places during that period. It was in Cullercoats (1881-82) that he developed his mature watercolor technique and his love of sea themes which he painted for the rest of his life.

Homer's late works are very thought provoking, often showing heroic subjects or themes; they show nature's beauty and its power and humans' mortality.

Homer lived a very solitary life, never truly realizing how really famous he was. He died at the age of 75, his last five years spent even more withdrawn from society and battling many illnesses. ... Read more


33. The Devil's Alchemists
by A.R. Homer
Paperback: 284 Pages (2008-09-15)
list price: US$14.95 -- used & new: US$12.20
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1595265031
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
Germany, 1942.When Hitler's leading nuclear physicists hesitate to develop an atom bomb, SS officer Max Heldorf assembles a shadow team of physicists - whose cooperation is guaranteed through an ingeniously devious plan - to build, in a remote location, the weapon that will ensure victory for Germany.On the project team is Hannah Goldmann, a brilliant physicist who becomes the lynchpin of the operation - and also a major distraction to Heldorf, who is obsessed by her beauty. Sweden and Denmark, 1942.Christina Lindgren, a courier for the OSS, falls afoul of the Gestapo and is trapped with vital intelligence - and an injured stranger, Jorgen Sorensen, a member of the Danish Resistance.They pool their strengths to escape and decide to act on the information in Christina's intelligence to organize the greatest resistance operation of all time - the rescue of all of Denmark's Jews.Preoccupied with the dangers of their undertaking, made even more perilous by a traitor in their midst, neither realizes that they have inadvertently come across a secret of monumental proportions: the plans for an atom bomb for Hitler. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (10)

5-0 out of 5 stars Better be first in this game!
A.R. Homer calls his work "Historical Fiction".....pretty much on the mark from where I sit. The atomic threat is right in front of us but it is not politically correct to even mention it. Remember that when an ostrich persists in sticking his head in a whole so it isn't frightened (do they really do this?), his ass is up in the air as a big target! His book based on the atomic effort by both sides during WW2 actually occured. We lived to tell about it.
Well, the same things are going on and I sure hope someone in Washington has the ability to read this book. Mr. Homer's ability to weave accurate historical events and characters that you can actually identify with is an art form in itself.
Based on the Nazi exploitation of enslaved Jewish scientists, a terrifying plot of Hitler's quest for imortality and revenge is played out against a background of the realistic workings of the Allied Intelligence organization.
Homer's ability to weave lifelike characters and a love story into his plots are the stuff that Hollywood needs to stay solvent in our present hard times.
This is a much needed fresh approach that has been a long time in coming.

5-0 out of 5 stars A masterpiece of WWII historical detail woven into high-powered suspense
I read A.R. Homer's first two novels -- "The Mirror of Diana" and "The Sobs of Autumn's Violins" -- and I love this author's books. He has an amazing story-telling ability to thrust the reader into his world--a re-enactment of World War II through the eyes of ordinary people suddenly forced to do extraordinary things to survive away from movie-set locations associated with the war. I don't know how I missed reading his third novel until now. This time he reconstructs a story around the race to build the atomic bomb between the Allies and the Third Reich, and yet again captures less known facts about Germany's own nuclear scientists who, by delaying their experiments, made it impossible for Hitler to use the arch weapon of destruction against the Allies and all humanity. Out of this Homer creates a "what if" plot that is just as plausible as any told until now. He has a gift for fleshing out characters - whether good or bad -- with whom we can understand and empathize. At the same time he brings in the back story about how the Danes rescued all Denmark's Jews and smuggled them to Sweden before Hitler's SS could arrest them and send them to concentration camps in the East. This feat on its own was an amazing achievement during the war. I come to this review after others have dealt with the story itself, and I join my praise with theirs. It will be interesting to see what segment of WWII Homer focuses on for his next novel. Whatever it is, I have come to expect page-turning excellence from A.R. Homer.

5-0 out of 5 stars Anthony Nagle
I asked the pilot to circle a few times so I could finish this page turner before getting my luggage.Not only is the story powerful, but throw in an element of Greek tragedy,Shakespearian irony, and DeToquevillian historical perspective (the only thing we learn from history is that we don't learn from it) and you've got the makings for a WW II barn burner.Even though I knew the German High Command failed to create an A bomb before the United States, I was able to suspend reality as the plot and characters more than once brought me to the edge of my seat.Ialso would recommendHomer's "The Mirror of Diana" if you're into WW II, Roman history, andthe beautiful topography of Italy.

5-0 out of 5 stars A captivating novel of World War II
Historical fiction is my favorite genre because I enjoy seeing history come alive through the eyes of individuals.And in The Devil's Alchemists, come alive it does - while the characters are interesting in their own right, they are all the more interesting because they are enmeshed in some fascinating World War II history.

I particularly enjoyed the female characters.Hannah Goldmann, a German Jewish physicist imprisoned in a concentration camp, believes she knows how to produce a bomb; soon she will be faced with an agonizing choice, and losing herself in her science is the only way she can justify the decision which brings her freedom and may bring freedom to her sister.Other German scientists want to pass a secret to Americans, andthe OSS sends Chirstina Lindgren, a WAAC, to neutral Sweden to receive it; there, she has brutal encounters with the Gestapo.

In Denmark, Resistance fighter Jorgen Sorensen is tough on the outside but soft on the inside, keeping an eye out for his little friend Peder, a ten-year-old autistic boy.Peder is one of the most remarkable characters of the novel: when the Gestapo moves in against his mother, he flees - and in his travels makes a discovery of epic proportions he is able to communicate only in the most astounding of ways.

Finally, there's SS man and physicist Max Heldorf, who concocts an ingenious plan to deliver the weapon that may be the Third Reich's last and best hope.

Each of these characters' separate stories, told in alternating chapters, eventually merges with all the others, hurtling together toward a thrilling climax.Homer is a master suspense builder, keeping the tension high throughout the novel and destroying your resolve to just read one more chapter.`The Devil's Alchemists' is a worthy successor to Homer's brilliant `Sobs of Autumn's Violins.'Like his other novels, `The Devil's Alchemists' is based on fact and is a thrilling - and often touching - tale of some of the lesser-known, but hardly less interesting, corners of World War II.I found this book utterly captivating.

4-0 out of 5 stars Nazi's, Prisoners,, and the Atomic Bomb
There are many fiction stories coming out the war in Europe, and "The Devil's Alchemists" is certainly one of the most unique.

A blend of fact and fiction, Author A.R. Homer presents a plausible situation where the Nazi's blackmail Jewish scientists to help them develop an atomic bomb prior to America. Homer skillfully blends the known facts of the Nazi atomic program - which was started by the many German Jewish scientists who fled to America - with the conceivable idea that the Nazi's could have blackmailed them by threatening to send their families to the death camps.

Homer is a good writer with a fine eye for detail. His characters are well-developed, and their dialogue accurately reflects society of that time period. Could the scenario "The Devil's Alchemists" presents have happened? The actual historical records of the time are brief enough that Homer's story could well be accurate. Sehr gut !
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34. The Keeper's Son (Josh Thurlow Series #1)
by Homer Hickam
Mass Market Paperback: 448 Pages (2004-08-31)
list price: US$7.99 -- used & new: US$3.89
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0312999496
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
Haunted by inner demons, Josh Thurlow returns home to Killakeet Island to command a small Coast Guard patrol boat manned by a colorful crew of locals. Dominating the glorious beauty of the little island is the majestic Killakeet Lighthouse, kept for generations by the Thurlow family. Its presence is a continuous reminder to Josh of the mysterious loss of his baby brother at sea seventeen years before, a tragedy for which he was blamed. But Josh is convinced that his brother might still be alive and begins searching for him even after German U-boats arrive and soak the beaches with blood.

Josh's quest puts him in the path of Otto Krebs-the most audacious of the U-boat commanders and a deadly enemy who may also hold the answers Josh is seeking. But when he meets Dosie Crossan, a young woman fighting her own war against the invaders, Josh must decide whether to risk all on a love that could destroy him or redeem him...
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Customer Reviews (44)

4-0 out of 5 stars Good read for WWII fiction fans
A good fictional account of what was happening on the coast of the United States at the beginning of the war.Also a look at the end of the lighthouse keepers profession.I enjoyed the book immensely, and will finish the series.

3-0 out of 5 stars Secondary characters make it hard to believe
Homer Hickam is a great memorist as he titles himself. His semi-autobiographical novel, Rocket Boys, is one of my treasured reads. The follow-ups to that were also works I found to be more than worthwhile. Wanting to write in a new genre, that of fiction, we turn to his account of a time that he is an expert on. That of the fighting that took place along the outer banks right when the US joined WWII.

Here I think we have not seen the full potential that we found in his earlier works. Perhaps it is the pacing, perhaps it is trying to apply a formula to the writing. Certainly the subject of the submarine attacks on american shipping are a subject that lend themselves to an historical novel. That everyone involved amongst the US are characters, virtually all eccentric, takes away from some of the details of the time period. Certainly our heroine typifies a modern woman in deed and attitude which also takes away from creating the nuance of the late thirties and early forties. These are things that Mr. Hickam's writing of the era of his teenage years do so well. Here I find it hard to believe in the people he has embody his story.

To some extent even our villains are not believable. Was there such a group of U-Boat men that waged war on innocents? Hard to say or know in this novel.

Perhaps with less quirky supporting characters, or even the one trait that drives the main character taken out of the story might have made this a much better and more believable book.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Keepers Son
You don't find to many books out there about the Coast Guard Service,and the actual roles that they did during WWI/WWII.Thank you to all the Men and Women Past and Present that serve in our USCG.

4-0 out of 5 stars Hickam takes on fiction
Very good first fiction for Hickam of Rocket Boy fame.He has an ear for dialogue and not-overdone description.One key plot twist was telegraphed too early, but Hickam wove the story around it so well that it didn't kill it.

The story is based on a fictional Outer Banks island and the life that centers around its lighthouse and the fishermen who live there.

This is the first of a series, followed up by The Ambassador's Son (Josh Thurlow Series #2)

5-0 out of 5 stars Desperate WWII Naval Action Off the Outer Banks
The horrendous sneak attack on Pearl Harbor focused American attention on the Pacific and the threat of German submarine attack on merchant shipping off the Atlantic coast was not appreciated.Homer Hickam writes a great story of a small Coast Guard unit based on Killakeet Island who man an 84-foot patrol boat in an attempt to forestall the U-boat aces as they destroy freighters and tankers shortly after the U.S. enters the war.Hickam describes the crew jarring transition from rescue work and fishing to desperate action against a ruthless and lethal enemy.He also includes a description of the mounted beach patrol, when cowboys along with their horses, were recruited to plug the patrol gap.

This is a entertaining story based on one of the more unique episodes in the vast conflict.
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35. The Watercolors of Winslow Homer
by Winslow Homer, Miles Unger
Hardcover: 224 Pages (2001-10-17)
list price: US$39.95 -- used & new: US$23.03
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0393020479
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
Winslow Homer's watercolors rank among the greatest pictorial legacies of this country. Winslow Homer's first medium was oil painting, although to make ends meet, he did commercial illustration and chronicled the New York City social scene. Eventually, Homer withdrew from city life altogether to settle at Prout's Neck on the rocky New England coast. There he turned to watercolor, in part for financial reasons (watercolors were easier to sell), but the newly popular medium also enabled him to capture his impressions of scenery and landscapes encountered during his many travels with an immediacy and directness impossible in the more time-consuming oils. Of his more than 700 watercolors, over 140 are reproduced here, dating from the 1870s to the turn of the century and ranging from pastoral to narrative, dramatic to serene. Miles Unger's text provides insight into the artist's technical mastery of the medium and discusses the importance of Homer's watercolors within the larger body of his work. 140 color illustrations. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (8)

4-0 out of 5 stars Beautiful Book
This is a nice collection of watercolor images by Winslow Homer. The text, while a little flowery at ties, gives some nice insight into the artist. The reproductions are what really makes this book a keeper. I refer to it regularly for inspiration and to study how this artist worked.

4-0 out of 5 stars Master Pieces!
The book is full with Winslow Homer's master pieces. Most painting images are big and clear, so you can see his strong brush strokes easily. The only minor flaw is the colors of the reproduction tend to be on bit of "dull" side - not as rich and sharp as to the real paintings.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Book to Enjoy
I am delighted with this book.Although there is extensive text, it is foremost a picture book of Homer's watercolors.Beyond the fine illustrated introduction, every spread of pages contains at least one of his pictures.Many of the pictures are full page in this generously dimensioned book, and those that cross the gutter show the care in placement exercised by the author and designer in minimizing any loss of impact.Enormous care was taken that no picture detail was lost in such two page printings.The ten chapters parallel Homer's life, and there is a sense of picking up of the easel, canvas, and paint box along with him as he moves to his considerably different venues.I enjoyed this book so much that I was inspired to hunt down my ancient watercolor equipment and try a few imitations!

5-0 out of 5 stars Winslow Homer's amazing watercolors...after all these years, still an inspiration
Hard to imagine a more inspiring watercolorist, historically or right now.Homer had a sure touch with his wonderful, calligraphic brushstrokes.He depicted life around him and makes it feel as real as the view out my own window--I'm there.

The book is beautifully produced, with many crisp illustrations to pore over.Even after well over 100 years, we still can learn contemporary techniques from this man.

5-0 out of 5 stars wonderful
i love the book. It has many good prints. It's great for watercolorists to see how the master did it. ... Read more


36. The Iliad: The Fitzgerald Translation
by Homer
Paperback: 632 Pages (2004-04-03)
list price: US$14.00 -- used & new: US$6.98
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0374529051
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
Anger be now your song, immortal one,
Akhilleus' anger, doomed and ruinous,
that caused the Akhaians loss on bitter loss
and crowded brave souls into the undergloom,
leaving so many dead men-carrion
for dogs and birds; and the will of Zeus was done.
-Lines 1-6

Since it was first published more than twenty-five years ago, Robert Fitzgerald's prizewinning translation of Homer's battle epic has become a classic in its own right: a standard against which all other versions of The Iliad are compared. Fitzgerald's work is accessible, ironic, faithful, written in a swift vernacular blank verse that "makes Homer live as never before" (Library Journal).

This edition includes a new foreword by Andrew Ford.
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Customer Reviews (45)

5-0 out of 5 stars Good Book
The book got to me in great time, and is in the condition it said it would be in

5-0 out of 5 stars The ground is dark with blood
With many books, translations are negligible, with two obvious exceptions, one is the Bible, and surprisingly the other is The Iliad. Each translation can give a different insight and feel to the story. Everyone will have a favorite.

For example:

"Rage--Goddess, sing the rage of Peleus' son Achilles,
Murderous, doomed, that cost the Achaeans countless losses,
hurling down to the House of Death so many souls,
great fighters' souls. But made their bodies carrion,
feasts for dogs and birds,
and the will of Zeus was moving towards its end.
Begin, Muse, when the two first broke and clashed,
Agamemnon lord of men and brilliant Achilles."
-Translated by Robert Fagles

"Sing, O Goddess, the anger of Achilles, son of Peleus, that brought countless ills upon the Achaeans. Many a brave soul did it send hurrying down to Hades, and many a heroes did it yield a prey to dogs and vultures for so were the counsels of Zeus fulfilled from the day on which the son of Atreus, king of men, and great Achilles first fell out with one another."
-Translated by Samuel Butler

"Rage:
Sing, Goddess, Achilles' rage,
Black and murderous, that cost the Greeks
Incalculable pain pitched countless souls
Of heroes into Hades' dark,
And let their bodies rot as feasts
For dogs and birds, as Zeus' will was done.
Begin with the clash between Agamemnon--
The Greek Warlord--and godlike Achilles."
-Translated by Stanley Lombardo

"Anger be now your song, immortal one,
Akhilleus' anger, doomed and ruinous,
that caused the Akhaians loss on bitter loss
and crowded brave souls into the undergloom,
leaving so many dead men--carrion
for dogs and birds; and the will of Zeus was done.
Begin it when the two men first contending
broke with one another--
the Lord Marshal Agamémnon, Atreus' son, and Prince Akhilleus."
-Translated by Translated by Robert Fitzgerald


Our story takes place in the ninth year of the ongoing war. We get some introduction to the first nine years but they are just a background to this tale of pride, sorrow and revenge. The story will also end abruptly before the end of the war.

We have the wide conflict between the Trojans and Achaeans over a matter of pride; the gods get to take sides and many times direct spears and shields.

Although the more focused conflict is the power struggle between two different types of power. That of Achilles, son of Peleus and the greatest individual warier and that of Agamemnon, lord of men, who's power comes form position.

We are treated to a blow by blow inside story as to what each is thinking and an unvarnished description of the perils of war and the search for Arête (to be more like Aries, God of War.)

-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Recorded Books Unabridged Classics
Performed by George Guidall
40 years career in the theater includes leading roles on Broadway.
George is very animated in this reading and adds the dimension of a great oral tradition.


Troy - The Director's Cut [Blu-ray]

5-0 out of 5 stars The ground is dark with blood
With many books, translations are negligible, with two obvious exceptions, one is the Bible, and surprisingly the other is The Iliad. Each translation can give a different insight and feel to the story. Everyone will have a favorite.

For example:

"Rage--Goddess, sing the rage of Peleus' son Achilles,
Murderous, doomed, that cost the Achaeans countless losses,
hurling down to the House of Death so many souls,
great fighters' souls. But made their bodies carrion,
feasts for dogs and birds,
and the will of Zeus was moving towards its end.
Begin, Muse, when the two first broke and clashed,
Agamemnon lord of men and brilliant Achilles."
-Translated by Robert Fagles

"Sing, O Goddess, the anger of Achilles, son of Peleus, that brought countless ills upon the Achaeans. Many a brave soul did it send hurrying down to Hades, and many a heroes did it yield a prey to dogs and vultures for so were the counsels of Zeus fulfilled from the day on which the son of Atreus, king of men, and great Achilles first fell out with one another."
-Translated by Samuel Butler

"Rage:
Sing, Goddess, Achilles' rage,
Black and murderous, that cost the Greeks
Incalculable pain pitched countless souls
Of heroes into Hades' dark,
And let their bodies rot as feasts
For dogs and birds, as Zeus' will was done.
Begin with the clash between Agamemnon--
The Greek Warlord--and godlike Achilles."
-Translated by Stanley Lombardo

"Anger be now your song, immortal one,
Akhilleus' anger, doomed and ruinous,
that caused the Akhaians loss on bitter loss
and crowded brave souls into the undergloom,
leaving so many dead men--carrion
for dogs and birds; and the will of Zeus was done.
Begin it when the two men first contending
broke with one another--
the Lord Marshal Agamémnon, Atreus' son, and Prince Akhilleus."
-Translated by Translated by Robert Fitzgerald


Our story takes place in the ninth year of the ongoing war. We get some introduction to the first nine years but they are just a background to this tale of pride, sorrow and revenge. The story will also end abruptly before the end of the war.

We have the wide conflict between the Trojans and Achaeans over a matter of pride; the gods get to take sides and many times direct spears and shields.

Although the more focused conflict is the power struggle between two different types of power. That of Achilles, son of Peleus and the greatest individual warier and that of Agamemnon, lord of men, who's power comes form position.

We are treated to a blow by blow inside story as to what each is thinking and an unvarnished description of the perils of war and the search for Arête (to be more like Aries, God of War.)

Troy - The Director's Cut [Blu-ray]

5-0 out of 5 stars The ground is dark with blood
With many books, translations are negligible, with two obvious exceptions, one is the Bible, and surprisingly the other is The Iliad. Each translation can give a different insight and feel to the story. Everyone will have a favorite. I have several.

For example:

"Rage--Goddess, sing the rage of Peleus' son Achilles,
Murderous, doomed, that cost the Achaeans countless losses,
hurling down to the House of Death so many souls,
great fighters' souls. But made their bodies carrion,
feasts for dogs and birds,
and the will of Zeus was moving towards its end.
Begin, Muse, when the two first broke and clashed,
Agamemnon lord of men and brilliant Achilles."
-Translated by Robert Fagles

"Sing, O Goddess, the anger of Achilles, son of Peleus, that brought countless ills upon the Achaeans. Many a brave soul did it send hurrying down to Hades, and many a heroes did it yield a prey to dogs and vultures for so were the counsels of Zeus fulfilled from the day on which the son of Atreus, king of men, and great Achilles first fell out with one another."
-Translated by Samuel Butler

"Rage:
Sing, Goddess, Achilles' rage,
Black and murderous, that cost the Greeks
Incalculable pain pitched countless souls
Of heroes into Hades' dark,
And let their bodies rot as feasts
For dogs and birds, as Zeus' will was done.
Begin with the clash between Agamemnon--
The Greek Warlord--and godlike Achilles."
-Translated by Stanley Lombardo

"Anger be now your song, immortal one,
Akhilleus' anger, doomed and ruinous,
that caused the Akhaians loss on bitter loss
and crowded brave souls into the undergloom,
leaving so many dead men--carrion
for dogs and birds; and the will of Zeus was done.
Begin it when the two men first contending
broke with one another--
the Lord Marshal Agamémnon, Atreus' son, and Prince Akhilleus."
-Translated by Translated by Robert Fitzgerald

"Sing, goddess, the anger of Peleus' son of Achilleus and its devastation, which puts pains thousandfold upon the Achains,
hurled in the multitudes to the house of Hades strong souls of heroes, but gave their bodies to be the delicate feasting of dogs, of all birds, and the will of Zeus was accomplished since that time when first there stood the division of conflict Atrecus' son the lord of men and brilliant Achilleus."
-Translated by Richmond Lattimore

You will find that some translations are easier to read but others are easier to listen to on recordings, lectures, Kindle, and the like.

Our story takes place in the ninth year of the ongoing war. We get some introduction to the first nine years but they are just a background to this tale of pride, sorrow and revenge. The story will also end abruptly before the end of the war.

We have the wide conflict between the Trojans and Achaeans over a matter of pride; the gods get to take sides and many times direct spears and shields.

Although the more focused conflict is the power struggle between two different types of power. That of Achilles, son of Peleus and the greatest individual warrior and that of Agamemnon, lord of men, whose power comes form position.

We are treated to a blow by blow inside story as to what each is thinking and an unvarnished description of the perils of war and the search for Arête (to be more like Aries, God of War.)

Troy - The Director's Cut [Blu-ray]

4-0 out of 5 stars One of our first war novels
I used the W. H. D. Rouse translation

One of our first war novels: the Achains and their allies send a great multitude of ships laden with armored warriors carrying bows, spears, and swords; divisions of horse drawn chariots rumble there way into the ranks of the Trojans and their allies laying siege to Troy.The Trojans counter-attack with a push all the way to the ships.And as we read, these gains and losses continue throughout the story.There is a short truce to mourn the dead and recoup, then the battle rages on only in our minds.

It flows like a song.Lucid, with wonderful imagery and symbolism's.Homer, with Rouses' help, bring out the details of battle and personalize each warrior: we learn he has a wife, a family, and a life elsewhere, after he has been cut in two and stripped of his armor.Men are slaughtered with an indifference, as if they were mere cattle.I found it hard to follow the extensive list of characters.I believe some of the realism was lost to modernization.I also found the knowledge Homer had of the human anatomy surprising.The footnotes were helpful.Better than Odyssey.

It is interesting to note: the gods control man, and man controls the gods.The two interact with each other; the gods send down their wrath and protections upon their favored nation.The gods are no different than the humans they try to control, except for their immortality.Hades is where all mortals go unto death.The parallels to the Bible are evident, with connotations of God.It can be hard to grasp.......a story that is 2,700 years old.

Wish you well
Scott





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37. The Iliad
by Homer
Kindle Edition: Pages (2004-07-01)
list price: US$0.00
Asin: B000JQUHX0
Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (11)

2-0 out of 5 stars Misleading cover image is of wrong version!
If you rely on the user-submitted image of the cover attached to this item, you might think that this is the highly-praised modern Richmond Lattimore translation (which would be one of the great bargains of classic literature!).However, the actual version you download will be an 1864 prose translation by "Edward, Earl of Derby."Not bad, if you like older language, don't mind prose instead of poetry, and can't afford any but the free version, but it certainly isn't Lattimore's translation.

3-0 out of 5 stars 19th Century verse translation, formatted as prose
This is a decent if somewhat archaic 19th century translation by the Earl of Derby, but the verse appears as prose, which is distracting. There seems to be a pattern of Kindle editions mangling verse.

4-0 out of 5 stars compelling story
I had read Fagles new translation, but nothing prepared me for the influential version. This is how the Iliad should be and the fabulous translation makes this accessible and easy to understand. A few parts are boring (the enumeration of ships and soldiers is boring), but this is a compelling story. The book is clear and easy to understand, evenly paced without dragging. Definitely a recommendation!

5-0 out of 5 stars The Iliad of Homer
First I would like to say thanks for making it free to public domain, what a blessing.Second this is the one used in the Great Books class for those who are taking it. I almost missed it because it did not have a cover picture on the search engine.

1-0 out of 5 stars Translation is Everything
As with the Bible, the translation or more specifically the translator is key. Not everyone can move poetry in one language into another. This is true of the Iliad, certainly true the the myriad mistranslations of the Bible. Kindle must include this information on the books being offered. There is no way to assess whether the book is worth downloading if the translator is not advertised. The Iliad and the Bible have suffered greatly at the hands of hacks and those who intentionally want to 'improve' the text. Please include the translator when presenting classic works. If it's just a reprint of someone else's work, (as so many reissues of the Bible are) than please say so. Republishing crap does not improve the smell. ... Read more


38. The Iliad: Volume II, Books 13-24 (Loeb Classical Library No. 171)
by Homer
Hardcover: 672 Pages (1925-01-01)
list price: US$24.00 -- used & new: US$19.20
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0674995805
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Editorial Review

Product Description
Here is a new Loeb Classical Library edition of Homer's stirring heroic account of the Trojan war and its passions. The eloquent and dramatic epic poem captures the terrible anger of Achilles, "the best of the Achaeans," over a grave insult to his personal honor and relates its tragic result-a chain of consequences that proves devastating for the Greek forces besieging Troy, for noble Trojans, and for Achilles himself. The poet gives us compelling characterizations of his protagonists as well as a remarkable study of the heroic code in antiquity. The works attributed to Homer include the two oldest and greatest European epic poems, the Odyssey and the Iliad. These have been published in the Loeb Classical Library for three-quarters of a century, the Greek text facing a faithful and literate prose translation by A.T. Murray. William F. Wyatt now brings the Loeb's Iliad up to date, with a rendering that retains Murray's admirable style but is written for today's readers. ... Read more


39. Homer's Odyssey A Commentary
by Denton Jaques Snider
Kindle Edition: Pages (2009-10-04)
list price: US$1.99
Asin: B002RKTDPY
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Editorial Review

Product Description
This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery. ... Read more


40. The Odyssey (Puffin Classics)
by Homer
Paperback: 112 Pages (1997-12-01)
list price: US$4.99 -- used & new: US$1.70
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0140383093
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
A modern retelling of the Homerian classic. The Trojan War is over, and Odysseus must now face the hungry one-eyed giant Polyphemus, the vengeful sea-god Poseidon, the sorceress Circe, and many other dangers on his long and perilous journey home. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (8)

5-0 out of 5 stars Imagery, Simile, Metaphor, Hyperbole Galore
The disclosure of the publisher "Puffin" rightly gives the fact that this is a child's version away.Yet, the prose of this text is not condescending.I love the use of imagery, similes, metaphor and hyperbole; this read is a treat for all ages, as it inspires the imagination in ways the original text may not for lack of so much detail.I enjoy reading the different versions of they Odyssey- analyzing the differences and appreciating the variety of interpretations is an exercise in and of itself.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Odyssey (Puffin Classics)
Exactly as promised!Arrived in a timely manner, as well

4-0 out of 5 stars The Odyssey puffin classics
The book was requested for my son who is in high school. It was an assignment for his english class. The shipping cost almost as much as the book. The book was easy reading and detailed the classic so that he understood the story.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Odyssey review
this book was for a 11year old girl who was doing a school summer project.She loved the book, the simplicity of the story and had her project completed in two days

5-0 out of 5 stars One eyed monsters- Oh My!
My daughter is 5 and will be in Kindergarten this fall. (she turns 6 this November) and she loves this tale. We read almost a full chapter, some are very long for a five year old, every night. The next day, oh yes, I am mean Cyclops, a Lotus Eater, etc. and she is brave Odysseus.(who is part super hero as she ties a towel around her neck!Since she is five and we are Christians I didn't tell her they were "gods" as it would take way more explanation than her dad and I wanted to get into. She first saw a picture of Posieden and thought he was a monster so we went with that. When she's older, we'll get into the Greek god mythology. I do change some of the wording, but not much, as it can get tedious for one so young. Highly recommend it. ... Read more


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