e99 Online Shopping Mall

Geometry.Net - the online learning center Help  
Home  - Book Author - Kinglake Alexander William (Books)

  1-12 of 12
A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

click price to see details     click image to enlarge     click link to go to the store

 
$24.02
1. Eothen, Or, Traces Of Travel Brought
 
$26.75
2. Eothen
 
3. EOTHEN, OR TRACES OF TRAVEL BROUGHT
 
$24.02
4. Eothen, Or, Traces Of Travel Brought
 
$19.68
5. Eothen; Or, Traces Of Travel Brought
 
$29.78
6. The invasion of the Crimea: its
 
$24.02
7. Eothen
 
8. Eothen. by Alexander William Kinglake
 
9. Eothen by A.W. Kinglake.
 
10. The invasion of the Crimea; its
11. Travelling gent: The life of Alexander
$9.97
12. Eothen: Traces of Travel Brought

1. Eothen, Or, Traces Of Travel Brought Home From The East ..
 Paperback: 254 Pages (2010-09-29)
list price: US$26.75 -- used & new: US$24.02
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1173216219
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

2. Eothen
 Paperback: 326 Pages (2010-09-29)
list price: US$30.75 -- used & new: US$26.75
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 117321738X
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

3. EOTHEN, OR TRACES OF TRAVEL BROUGHT HOME FROM THE EAST [MIDDLE EAST]
by Alexander William [1809-1891] Kinglake
 Hardcover: Pages (1849)

Asin: B004289PLQ
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

4. Eothen, Or, Traces Of Travel Brought Home From The East
 Paperback: 252 Pages (2010-09-29)
list price: US$26.75 -- used & new: US$24.02
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1173216766
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

5. Eothen; Or, Traces Of Travel Brought Home From The East
 Paperback: 236 Pages (2010-09-27)
list price: US$26.75 -- used & new: US$19.68
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1173104135
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

6. The invasion of the Crimea: its origin, and an account of its progress down to the death of Lord Raglan Volume 5
 Paperback: 496 Pages (2010-10-15)
list price: US$38.75 -- used & new: US$29.78
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1172264929
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

7. Eothen
 Paperback: 266 Pages (2010-10-15)
list price: US$27.75 -- used & new: US$24.02
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 117226953X
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

8. Eothen. by Alexander William Kinglake with an introduction b
by Kinglake. Alexander William. 1809-1891.
 Paperback: Pages (1900-01-01)

Asin: B002WTVFY2
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

9. Eothen by A.W. Kinglake.
by Kinglake. Alexander William. 1809-1891.
 Paperback: Pages (1898-01-01)

Asin: B002WTVG00
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

10. The invasion of the Crimea; its origin. and an account of its pr
by Kinglake. Alexander William. 1809-1891.
 Paperback: Pages (1877-01-01)

Asin: B002WTNDI8
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

11. Travelling gent: The life of Alexander Kinglake (1809-1891)
by Gerald De Gaury
Hardcover: 8 Pages (1972)

Isbn: 0710073100
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

12. Eothen: Traces of Travel Brought Home from the East (Marlboro Travel)
by Alexander William Kinglake
Paperback: 245 Pages (1997-04-01)
list price: US$21.00 -- used & new: US$9.97
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0810160358
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
While travel writing had already enjoyed a long and honored tradition in England, the publication in 1844 of Alexander Kinglake's Eothen forever changed the genre, and its influence may be traced down the generations from Robert Curzon's Monasteries of the Levant (1849) to Paul Theroux's Great Railway Bazaar (1975).Eothen--a Greek word meaning "from the east"--is certainly one of the most witty and idiosyncratic of travel books, for Kinglake was not as interested in the art, buildings, or appearance of a particular place than he was in the impression these made on him.And unlike most other wealthy travelers of his time, Kinglake took especial delight in the exotic and slightly danagerous aspects of his travel.
Avoiding the obligatory ports of call of the English gentleman's Grand Tour, Kinglake followed a circuitous route from Europe to what was then called the Near East--Turkey, the countries of the Holy Land, Egypt.Rarely does he make an effort to describe scenery, and some of the most well-known of his stops are hardly mentioned at all: Bethlehem he dismisses in thirteen lines, and Baalbec, well, "Come! Baalbec is over; I got 'rather well' out of that."But he devotes a whole chapter to the Sphinx--or rather to his contemplation of the Sphinx--and while he rarely imparts any information useful to future travelers, he constantly transforms his experience into a lively, reckless, sometimes unfair, sometimes moving, often hilarious artistic interpretation.It was this unusual and captivating style which so intrigued his first readers and made Eothen an enduring bestseller in his time; it is also what makes it a classic in ours. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (7)

4-0 out of 5 stars Inventing the East
"Eothen" is a marvellous source of Victorian "Orientalism". Completely unconscious, Alexander William Kingsley, projects his British self into alien worlds equipped with such phrases as "soft Asiatic", and "the Oriental", or,"my poor Arabs being on foot", and his "dragoman" doing his bullying for him (which he feels is utterly necessary in the desert which he crosses partially guided by a Bedouin caravan. Kinglake knows only a few word of Arabic but is full of opinions about the "Asian" man. The most famous scene in the book is set in the midst of the desert, when after days of travelling alone (with his Arab retinue) another Englishman on camel-back appears on the horizon going into the opposite direction. While the Arabs who are in their employ will not be deprived of the pleasure of exchanging greetings and news, the two Englishmen would have passed one another by simply by doffing their caps and waiving their arms, as they would have in London. In fact they pass one another and only turn around , on second thought, when they had passed each other by forty yards. The other gentleman, an Army Officer, on of the "few thousand satrong Englishmen to whome the empire of INdia is committed".
"Eothen" then is about British empire, therefore, and travelling enabled by British banks and their global outlets. For the home reader it created the romance of far places, but closed channels of communication rather than opening them, and created the possibility of disrespect based on superficial judgements, failing to see that travelling only puts the traveller in touch with a minute part of foreign society, and only for a short time. We still have to overcome such travel writing, and it is instructive to see the precedents of contemporary attitudes to "the East".

5-0 out of 5 stars Delightfully entertaining
Eothen is a kind of quirky travelogue describing Alexander Kinglake's 1834 tour of the Near East; it was originally published in 1844.

Kinglake, like many an English gentleman (and lady) of his era, is full of prejudices and preconceptions about other cultures and races. He takes "the natural ascendancy of Europeans" as a graven truth, and doesn't scruple at making sweeping generalizations about Arabs, Jews, Turks, Greeks, and everyone else he encounters. The book, for this reason, probably reveals more about Kinglake than it does about the places he travelled. His descriptions of the customs and characters he observes are those of "a partial, prejudiced, & ignorant" outsider, and for that reason must be viewed with skepticism - but they are wonderfully entertaining all the same.

Here is an example of the witty style that makes this book delightful to read:

"Christianity permits, and sanctions, the drinking of wine, and of all the holy brethren in Palestine there are none who hold fast to this gladsome rite so strenuously as the monks of Damascus; not that they are more zealous Christians than the rest of their fellows in the Holy Land, but that they have better wine. Whilst I was at Damascus I had my quarters at the Franciscan convent there, and very soon after my arrival I asked one of the monks to let me know something of the spots that deserved to be seen... "There is nothing in all Damascus," said the good man, "half so well worth seeing as our cellars"; and forthwith he invited me to go, see, and admire the long range of liquid treasure that he and his brethren had laid up for themselves on earth. And these I soon found were not as the treasures of the miser, that lie in unprofitable disuse, for day by day, and hour by hour, the golden juice ascended from the dark recesses of the cellar to the uppermost brains of the friars..."

Highly recommended.

5-0 out of 5 stars Inspirational
If you've ever had a dream to travel outside of your own backyard, this book will give you the push you need to make that decision. Alexander Kinglake takes you through the exotic east by the most interesting modes of transportation. Horseback, Camels, Dromedaries, and fantastic sea vessels. You'll travel through places such as Stanboul, Constantinople, Cyprus, Galilee, Cairo, the Pyramids, and Jerusalem just to name a few.

A brilliant descriptive writer, Kinglake tells you every detail about what he's viewing along the way, along with the emotional side of traveling through history. Standing on a hilltop, possibly the precise spot where Homer did, that inspired his works, Kinglake takes you there with him, describing unchanged landscape and the flood of emotions that will definately touch you. When he arrived at the Holy lands, it left me in tears, and a great yearning to plan my own pilgrimage there.

It amazed me that this man made it through his travels safe and sound. He survived the plague which was rampant at that time. It was frightening to read about, let alone live through it! Which he tells about in depth. The extreme fear everyone lived in. Yet despite all the precautions taken, it still managed to seek you out and take you into it's unimaginable numbers. Day after day, he watched cavalcades of funeral processions pass through the streets, from sunrise to well beyond sunset. How he fooled it, I'll never know. He always seemed to be in contact with plague stricken people, and even thought for a time that he too had fallen victim when symptoms began to appear.

Through this journal you'll learn about the people of this era and before. The Ottomans, Bedouins, Monks, Jews, Catholics, and Christians. Aristocrats, such as Lady Hester, Sheiks, and Pasha's. Most interesting was Kinglake himself. Just who was this man? He tells little about his own background. But as you read, this intelligent, confident, diplomatic Englishman unfolds before you. With a sense of humor few can match!

This book was gifted to me, and sparked the desire to be a part of what Kinglake and others knew about life. Not to let each day pass by caught up in mundane routines, but live each one to the fullest.

5-0 out of 5 stars Sparkling writing from the Turkish Empire
This is a book to be treasured and I read it several times.It is hard to imagine the world Kinglake describes which is virtually extinct now at a time when lions abounded in Eastern Europe, Caliphs and Pashas smoked their pipes through long tubing and Lady Hester Stanhope gets esoteric.

Full of humour, the book is as British as they come with such sensitive nuances about the subject matter including disease, women, customs and issues of religion in the holy land.

I'm still looking for this brand of hero inside and out but don't think he's that common except as a carricature.Did Kinglake's world and attitude really exist?

5-0 out of 5 stars Eothen
Once asked how he learned to write so well, Winston Churchill growled, "Kinglake."That was Alexander Kinglake whose main works were this slim travelogue reporting on his tour as a young man through the Levant and a huge history of the Crimean war which occupied most of hislife.Eothen is a wonderfully engaging tale of a traveler and the peoplehe encounters in what was at the time a formidable journey. We arefortunate that it is back in print, bibliophiles treasure the early,leather-bound editions. ... Read more


  1-12 of 12
A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

Prices listed on this site are subject to change without notice.
Questions on ordering or shipping? click here for help.

site stats