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1. Tales from Shakespeare / by Charles
 
2. Mrs. Leicester's school and other
 
$31.08
3. The Works Of Charles And Mary
 
$29.78
4. All Shakespeare's Tales
 
$26.62
5. Tales From Shakespeare
 
$26.62
6. Tales From Shakespeare
 
$29.78
7. Tales From Shakespeare
 
$21.42
8. Tales From Shakespeare
 
$27.30
9. The Letters of Charles and Mary
 
$80.67
10. The Letters of Charles and Mary
 
$64.92
11. The Letters of Charles and Mary
$149.96
12. A Double Singleness: Gender and
$0.01
13. Mad Mary Lamb: Lunacy and Murder
 
14. A Descriptive Catalogue of the
 
$38.50
15. Lambs, Their Lives, Their Friends
 
$136.95
16. The Life of Charles Lamb
$1.96
17. The Devil Kissed Her: The Story
 
$12.18
18. The Coast of Illyria: A Play in

1. Tales from Shakespeare / by Charles and Mary Lamb ; with an introductory note by Elizabeth Stuart Phelps Ward ; illustrated by pen drawings after the designs by H. Pille, etched by L. Monzies
by Charles (1775-1834). Lamb, Mary (1764-1847) Lamb
 Hardcover: Pages (1908)

Asin: B003ZMG4I2
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2. Mrs. Leicester's school and other writings in prose and verse
by Charles (1775-1834) & Lamb, Mary (1764-1847) - Related name: Ainger, Alfre Lamb
 Hardcover: Pages (1890)

Asin: B0012BQH5I
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3. The Works Of Charles And Mary Lamb
by Lamb Charles 1775-1834, Lamb Mary 1764-1847, Wordsworth Collection
 Paperback: 534 Pages (2010-10-06)
list price: US$40.75 -- used & new: US$31.08
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1172164185
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4. All Shakespeare's Tales
by Lamb Charles 1775-1834, Lamb Mary 1764-1847
 Paperback: 496 Pages (2010-10-13)
list price: US$38.75 -- used & new: US$29.78
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Asin: 1172046840
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5. Tales From Shakespeare
by Lamb Charles 1775-1834, Lamb Mary 1764-1847
 Paperback: 362 Pages (2010-10-14)
list price: US$32.75 -- used & new: US$26.62
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1172104425
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6. Tales From Shakespeare
by Lamb Charles 1775-1834, Lamb Mary 1764-1847
 Paperback: 386 Pages (2010-10-14)
list price: US$33.75 -- used & new: US$26.62
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1172104220
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7. Tales From Shakespeare
by Lamb Charles 1775-1834, Lamb Mary 1764-1847
 Paperback: 454 Pages (2010-10-14)
list price: US$36.75 -- used & new: US$29.78
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Asin: 117210378X
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8. Tales From Shakespeare
by Lamb Charles 1775-1834, Lamb Mary 1764-1847, Punchard Charles Deane
 Paperback: 202 Pages (2010-10-15)
list price: US$24.75 -- used & new: US$21.42
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Asin: 1172271704
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9. The Letters of Charles and Mary Anne Lamb, 1809-1817 (Letters of Charles & Mary Anne Lamb)
by Charles Lamb, Mary Anne Lamb
 Hardcover: 320 Pages (1978-05)
list price: US$75.00 -- used & new: US$27.30
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Asin: 0801411297
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10. The Letters of Charles and Mary Anne Lamb, 1801-1809 (Letters of Charles & Mary Anne Lamb)
by Charles Lamb, Mary Anne Lamb
 Hardcover: 336 Pages (1976-06)
list price: US$110.50 -- used & new: US$80.67
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0801409772
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11. The Letters of Charles and Mary Anne Lamb, Volume 1: Letters of Charles Lamb 1796-1801
by Charles Lamb, Mary Anne Lamb
 Hardcover: 292 Pages (1975-12)
list price: US$110.50 -- used & new: US$64.92
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Asin: 0801409306
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12. A Double Singleness: Gender and the Writings of Charles and Mary Lamb
by Jane Aaron
Hardcover: 232 Pages (1991-09-12)
list price: US$150.00 -- used & new: US$149.96
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0198128908
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Editorial Review

Product Description
In 1796 when Mary Lamb, in a sudden attack of violent frenzy, killed her mother, her brother Charles took her care upon himself, thus sparing her from incarceration in Bedlam. For the next thirty years, they lived and wrote together. Informed by feminist and psychoanalytic literary theory, this study provides an entirely new perspective on the lives and writings of the Lambs.Aaron argues that their ideological inheritance as the children of servants, their work experience as clerk and needlewoman, and the role played by madness and matricide in their lives resulted in writings that were at variance with the spirit of their age. Aaron focuses particularly on how the intensity of their sibling relationship led, in Charles's writings, to texts stylistically and thematically opposed to the masculinist stance currently considered characteristic of Romantic writers. ... Read more


13. Mad Mary Lamb: Lunacy and Murder in Literary London
by Susan Tyler Hitchcock
Hardcover: 333 Pages (2005-01-30)
list price: US$24.95 -- used & new: US$0.01
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0393057410
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
After the style of The Professor and the Madman, a dramatic story set against a backdrop of literary history.

Mary Lamb—a dutiful daughter, well liked by just about everyone—killed her own mother with a knife. She spent the rest of her life in and out of madhouses, yet the crime and its aftermath opened up a life that no woman of her time or class could have expected. Free to read extensively, Lamb discovered her talent for writing. She and her brother, the essayist Charles Lamb, embarked on a literary collaboration that resulted in the famous Tales from Shakespeare. Confidante to many of Britain's Romantics including Coleridge, Godwin, and Wordsworth, Mary Lamb stood at the vibrant center of a colorful literary circle. Through a deep reading of history, letters, and literature, Susan Tyler Hitchcock brings to life an intriguing portrait of Lamb and her world. This narrative of a nearly forgotten woman becomes a tapestry of insights into creativity and madness, the changing lives of women, and the redemptive power of the written word. 32 illustrations. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (8)

4-0 out of 5 stars A violent murder gives birth to a literary icon
"Mad Mary Lamb: Lunacy and Murder in Literary London" begins with the September 1796 murder of elderly Elizabeth Lamb. Her spinster daughter, Mary, snapped under the strain of caring for her aging parents and aunt, and reacted to a caustic remark by plunging a carving knife deep into Mrs. Lamb's chest. Mary was confined in a private lunatic asylum for several weeks, and spent the rest of her life juggling literary brilliance and debilitating insanity. Her champion was her brother, famous essayist and poet Charles Lamb, with whom she lived until his death in 1834.

Charles and Mary Lamb co-authored a children's book called Tales from Shakespeare, which became a bestseller and remained in print for many years. Together and separately, the Lambs produced children's books, poetry collections, and magazine and newspaper articles. Their success made them central figures in an energetic writers' and artists' circle that included Samuel Taylor Coleridge, William Wordsworth, and William Hazlitt.

The book is well-written but the title is somewhat misleading. It's not a work of True Crime per se: "Mad Mary Lamb" is both a biography of the Lamb siblings and a history of early nineteenth England's literary establishment. But Susan Tyler Hitchcock advances the intriguing argument that the act of matricide freed Mary to become a 'woman of letters'. As a mental patient, she experienced few of the expectations or demands that women of her era traditionally dealt with, leaving her free to undertake the unconventional role of female writer. The death of her mother was the birth of her literary career.

3-0 out of 5 stars Interesting slice of London life, but Lambs' hagiography undeserved
Mad Mary Lamb provides an interesting look at various aspects of British society in late-Georgian London, as well as providing the story of Mary and Charles Lamb, two writers, brother and sister, who were as devoted to each other throughout their adult lives as any two married people.The book is really about both brother and sister, discussing their lives, their relationship and their friends.Both struggled with mental illness.Charles though was much less profoundly affected by it than Mary, whose life eventually became overwhelmed by increasingly frequent psychotic episodes.Mary was 10 years older, and in the grip of her first spasm of mental illness murdered her abusive mother with a kitchen knife.Her work is discussed in brief.In truth it can't be said to be memorable, even though their "Tales from Shakespeare" for children has been in print in many languages for almost 200 years.By avoiding a more substantial discussion of their work the author does manage to avoid interfering with her attempt at hagiography.In their version of "The Merchant of Venice", devoid of its poetic context and careful parsing the play becomes simply a crude anti-semitic story (easily accessible full text online) -- with an audience of children.In perhaps Charles' most well-known work, Essays of Elia, the essay "Imperfect Sympathies" (also available online) displays his smarmy and shameless dislike of Scots, Jews and Blacks hiding behind a veneer of discriminating taste and judiciousness.

5-0 out of 5 stars "Lunacy replaced moral defect as an explanation for violence in extraordinary circumstances."
In 1796 Mary Lamb thrust a knife into her mother's chest, in that instant breaking free of the drudgery that consumed her days, but at what cost? Sent to Fisher House, a private, quasi-affordable madhouse in Islington, Mary underwent the usual brutal and humiliating treatments dictated by science at the time, similar to those King George III was subjected to ten years before. Whether the madhouse experience damaged her creatively is still a source of discussion, but certainly she fell into line, causing no further disturbance, eventually moving into rooms of her own with the help of her younger brother, Charles Lamb. Eventually Charles and Mary Lamb devised a manner of living, what he called "double-singleness", Mary accepted into her brother's literary circle and appreciated for her sharp intelligence and intellectual curiosity. Together they co-authored three books, Tales from Shakespear (1807), Mrs. Leicester's School (1809) and Poetry for Children (1809).

Mad Mary Lamb is an extensively researched, impressive reconstruction of Mary's life on the fringes of literary society, freed by the act that sundered her from family obligations beyond the society of her brother. London was teeming with literary genius, the country infused with political uncertainty and a rapidly changing world where ideas were exchanged in lively debate in salons all over the city. Most women were hidden behind society's restraints, great literary achievements solely the purview of the male gender. While Charles moved in and out of his own creative forays, Mary nurtured seeds of her own writing. Her contribution to Tales of Shakespear was certainly equal to her brother's, a challenging task in any case. Mary's ability to empathize enabled her to step inside the identities of others: "It was her deep and sympathetic feeling, coupled with her intellect, that brought her admiration from men of such high standards as Coleridge."

What Mad Mary Lamb points out most succinctly is the blossoming of her writing life after the tragic event of the murder. Her creativity stifled by a spinster's role in society that relegated her to little more than a domestic servant, albeit to family, the murder offered Mary a unique opportunity she might otherwise not have known. Never audacious or brave enough to tackle the more dangerous boundaries, Mary Lamb transgressed just enough to participate in a lively literary life, at the side of her prolific brother, Charles Lamb, who was also an accomplished essayist. Yet her life after the death of her mother and interment in the mental hospital was far more than the dreary spinsterhood that would have been her fare had she not committed the crime. Hitchcock's attention to detail is extraordinary and extensive, with copious notes, bibliography and index, Mary Lamb brought to life on these pages, her crime, tentative reach toward life and the fulfilling world of writing afforded by a violent transgression against society's most basic tenant. Luan Gaines/ 2006.

3-0 out of 5 stars Mary Had A Little Lamb, and A Knife.
This is an example of the Nineteenth Century literary imagination coupled with the new style of writing 'history' which doesn't have to stick with the facts but can create a few for entertainment effects.Mrs. Hitchcock used letters to show the human Mary Lamb.She suffered a madness similar to Mary Lincoln.Only through the intervention on the part of her brother who helped her to write TALES FROM SHAKESPEARE, she was not confined to a mental institution for the long years of her life.It was the literary redemption and the 'power of the written word' which save her sanity and her life.

It is the compelling story of the English Lizzie Borden.If her brother had not been the famous Charles Lamb, we would never have known about this tragic life and death and the circumstances which compelled her to kill her own mother with a big knife in 1796.Lizzie, on the other hand, used an ax to chop her father to death because of a supposed indiscretion (his or hers?) and a nasty step-mother.Perhaps he had it coming, to sequester an old-maid daughter to watch him faun over and fondle that woman in her mother's house.

You don't have to be in the throes of a mental illness to kill someone.There is a popular song called 'Killing Me Softly With His Song.'There are numerous incidences in ballads and folk tales about murders due to unrequited love and perceived slights.Even extensive and unwarranted criticism can induce the killing instinct of self-preservation.

I'm not saying that any of these caused her to kill her mother.She alone knew the deep reason for such drastic actions.Sometimes, people are just driven too far and their minds 'snap.'It is a type of temporary madness due to circumstances; it is a compulsion beyond their control.When the young boys in Chicago killed a neighbor boy as explained in the book COMPULSION and a more recent killing of a partly-autistic boy by two neighbor boys happened, no one really knows what makes children kill children.Kids are mean until they are taught by the adults in their families that you cannot always act on your wants and desires of the moment.

Mary would have surely lost her mind except for the loving care of her brother and his literary friends.Charles died in 1835 at the age of sixty, and she lived to be past eighty.They'd lived a sheltered life prior to a few years before the murder.The move may have brought on Mary's inclinations to hit back.

Photographs of the luminaries of that time and some drawings enhance the narrative.It is interesting, but not unusual.

2-0 out of 5 stars Fascinating Story but Unfocused and Colorless Presentation
1. The subject of this book is great!
2. The writing style is a bit wobbly at times.
3. The author jumps around and discusses way too many famous literary figures who have little or nothing to do with Mary Lamb's personal triumphs and failures.
4. Very little is actually told about Mary Lamb, who is supposed to be the featured character of this story!
5. The author inserts a lot of modernistic idealogy that would have been unknown to English men and women in 1795.
6. Gives a quick summary of a very complex woman.
7. Gives an even quicker summary of a very changing, difficult, and dramatic period of English history. ... Read more


14. A Descriptive Catalogue of the Letters of Charles and Mary Anne Lamb in the W. Hugh Peal Collection (Occasional papers / University of Kentucky Libraries)
 Paperback: 48 Pages (1912-12)
list price: US$15.00
Isbn: 0917519027
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15. Lambs, Their Lives, Their Friends and Their Correspondence: New Particulars and New Materials
by William Hazlitt
 Hardcover: 244 Pages (1997-06)
list price: US$38.50 -- used & new: US$38.50
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Asin: 0404073697
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16. The Life of Charles Lamb
by E. V. Lucas
 Hardcover: Pages (1968-06)
list price: US$136.95 -- used & new: US$136.95
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Asin: 0404040594
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Editorial Review

Product Description
Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.This is an OCR edition with typos.Excerpt from book:CHAPTER IIIA very Short Chapter—Charles Aders—John Thelwall and the Champion —Lamb's Political Epigrams—The Regent and Canning—James Sheridan Knowles—The Wordsworths in London—The Lambs at Cambridge Again—Emma Isola—Mary Lamb Again Ill—Miss Kelly —Thomas Allsop.TO 1820, in one respect the most important year in Lamb's life, belong only five or six letters, all of which are comparatively trivial, the principal one being from Mary Lamb to Mrs. Vincent Novello, to sympathise with her on the loss of a little girl (the same little girl that prompted Leigh Hunt's essay "Death of Little Children").Crabb Robinson helps to fill in the gaps:"January 3rd, 1820:—A call on Miss Lamb. Later met Charles and Miss Lamb at Mr. Aders'. I was not in spirits. Aders exhibited his Campo Sacro to L. which he greatly enjoyed. And we had a rubber or two of whist. Mr. and Mrs. Smith also were of the party. We staid long, Aders had provided a profuse supper. L. was temperate but rather dull at the same time. However he seemed to enjoy himself, and that is the truest flattery." Charles Aders, a friend of Robinson, was a merchant of German extraction,with a house in Euston Square packed with pictures. In 1831, Lamb wrote some lines on his collection, and one of the prettiest of his later poems, " Angel Help," was suggested by an engraving in Mrs. Aders" album." March 2nd:—I called in the forenoon on Lamb to give him £10, a contribution towards sending Tom Holcroft to India. He will probably soon set out, and I consider this morning as well spent. Villiers H. is well settled in India and has offered to provide for his brother if he can be sent out. Miss L. told me of a Burney party this evening, and I went to James Street. . . . Walked home late with the Lambs."April 2oth. Thursday:—I to... ... Read more


17. The Devil Kissed Her: The Story of May Lamb
by Kathy Watson
Hardcover: 256 Pages (2004-09-09)
list price: US$24.95 -- used & new: US$1.96
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1585423564
Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
Kathy Watson explores Mary Lamb's famous crime and her remarkable relationship with her brother Charles.

Author Mary Lamb, long considered by historians a mere adjunct to her brother Charles, was a woman of contradictions: fiercely domestic yet unmarried; maternal yet childless; a peaceful, loving woman susceptible to bouts of extreme violence.

In this fascinating book, Kathy Watson traces the extraordinary intertwined lives of Mary Lamb and her brother Charles, authors of the perennial children's book Tales of Shakespeare. Their uncommonly close relationship-an ersatz marriage-was bound ever closer after Mary murdered their mother with a carving knife during a psychotic episode. Sharing the same constellation of friends-Coleridge and Wordsworth among them-yet plagued by Mary's manic depression, the Lambs' lives have long been shrouded in ambiguity.

In The Devil Kissed Her, Watson documents the nature of Mary's mental illness and the terrible crime she committed in its haze, the lifelong devotion of Charles, and the brother and sister's dual existence in both the calm domesticity of their home life and the bedlam of nineteenth-century mental asylums. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (2)

2-0 out of 5 stars Complex Story Doesn't Translate Well
Charles and Mary Lamb's slim volume, "Lamb's Tales Of Shakespeare" has been one of two children's books in continous publication since the late 1700's (the other is Robinson Crusoe). The lines in an encyclopedia do not begin to describe the intertwined histories of the brother and sister authors. Kathy Watson has attempted a daunting task: To put into context eighteenth century English societal structure, women's roles and education in said society, and historical treatment and diagnosis of mental conditions, all amidst the author's effort to tell a cohesive individual family history of at least two generations from birth to death. May I add, in 238 pages. The end result is sloppy, headache-inducing, confused, and exhausting for the reader. Focus and vision is what this book lacks, and afeeling that historical letters and documents that should have been rigorously used and cited, and were not, leads readers with a gaping absence of solid documentation. Instead we are left withimagined fancies of possibilities and insinuations that are annoying and amateurish. The story of brother and sister Charles and Mary Lamb had the basis for a compelling historical and societal story, but is miles away from fruition in this work. An initial enthusiasm and energy in the beginning quickly fades to a dull desperation. Her conclusion that Mary's life took a turn for the better when she killed her mother in a fit of manic rage was quite disturbing. The liberties taken demote this book from a potential literary history to tawdry dime store novel.

5-0 out of 5 stars Mary Lamb's Madness
Kathy Watson argues ably and nimbly that we should not regard Mary Lamb's madness as an occasional thing that visited her and left no traces, leaving the essential Mary Lamb behind.No, it was part and parcel of her personality, and can be seen in her writing as well.Watson discovers that outside of the famous TALES FROM SHAKESPEARE which she wrote with her brother Charles (splitting down the corpus of Shakespeare by ignoring the histories, writing up the comedies, and leaving the tragedies to Charles), Mary Lamb wrote other books as well, which she makes sound perfectly fascinating.I would love to read the "Mrs. Leicester" book and hope that Tarcher, which published this fine biography, will print a companion book of Mary Lamb's collected writing.

She hints also that Mary was drawn to many men, including the romantic poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge, who was so sexy that she just couldn't help herself when he was around.Charles eventually had to ask Coleridge not to come around because a visit from him would find Mary going a little crazy.

Watson brings us into the early 19th century world of the madhouse, which is a pretty creepy place.Women with private means like Mary Lamb had their own rooms and own attendants, but still they must have seen some dreadful sights, making their lives very different from other women of their class who were in general protected from the seamy.You can never forget however, that Mary killed her own mother with a knife, a crime so rare that people hardly ever run into it, even judges with long histories of criminal cases, even hardened homicide cops.Why did she do it?Watson provides a limited answer.In my mind Mary Lamb's psychology was similar to Lizzie Borden's, except she was perhaps more lovable and had more of a humorous nature.But both were brooders and both nurtured an unassimilable hatred toward the patriarchal structure of the family. ... Read more


18. The Coast of Illyria: A Play in Three Acts
by Dorothy Parker, Ross Evans
 Paperback: 232 Pages (1990-03-01)
list price: US$19.00 -- used & new: US$12.18
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0877452881
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Customer Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Superb
This is a superb rendition of descent into madness. A frightening play. What makes it even more interesting to me is that it is about literary siblings Mary and Charles Lamb, whose "Tales of Shakespeare" is still in print, over a hundred years after publication. An additional bonus is that the Lambs were friends of Aaron Burr, about whom I've done numerous reviews. ... Read more


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