e99 Online Shopping Mall

Geometry.Net - the online learning center Help  
Home  - Book Author - Lawton Frederick (Books)

  Back | 21-40 of 43 | Next 20
A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

click price to see details     click image to enlarge     click link to go to the store

 
$23.16
21. The Roman Capitol In Ancient And
 
22. Criminal Law and Forensic Psychiatry
 
23. Anthology of French Poetry from
 
24. Balzac, by Frederick Lawton
 
25. Thomas Lawton: Immigrant, 1638,
 
26. Genealogical data and revolutionary
 
27. The descendants of John Kelsey,
 
28. The role and responsibility of
 
29. Tyler families of early Branford,
 
30. The Emperor Frederick III and
$195.86
31. Bluffing Mr. Churchill (Frederick
$3.83
32. A Little White Death
$8.95
33. Riptide
$6.00
34. Flesh Wounds: An Inspector Troy
35. Old Flames
 
$33.99
36. Black Out: A Novel
$28.95
37. Balzac (Webster's French Thesaurus
$28.95
38. Balzac (Webster's Portuguese Thesaurus
 
39. Three artists of Alaska: Fred
 
40. Her secret world

21. The Roman Capitol In Ancient And Modern Times: The Citadel, The Temples, The Senatorial Palace, The Palace Of The Conservators, The Museum (1906)
by Emmanuel Rodocanachi
 Paperback: 286 Pages (2010-09-10)
list price: US$23.16 -- used & new: US$23.16
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1165104873
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
This scarce antiquarian book is a selection from Kessinger Publishing's Legacy Reprint Series. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment to protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature. Kessinger Publishing is the place to find hundreds of thousands of rare and hard-to-find books with something of interest for everyone! ... Read more


22. Criminal Law and Forensic Psychiatry
by D.J. Power, Patrick Curran, J.M. Hughes
 Hardcover: 636 Pages (1996-11)

Isbn: 1872328229
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

23. Anthology of French Poetry from the Time of Froissart Up to the Beginning of the Present Century (French Edition) (2010 Reprint)
by Frederick Lawton
 Paperback: Pages (2010-01-26)

Asin: B003VA6514
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

24. Balzac, by Frederick Lawton
by Frederick Lawton
 Unknown Binding: 388 Pages (1910)

Asin: B0008AE9KY
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

25. Thomas Lawton: Immigrant, 1638, Aquidneck (Rhode) Island
by Frederick T Lawton
 Unknown Binding: Pages (1950)

Asin: B0007I3LT2
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

26. Genealogical data and revolutionary war service of four men named Jabez Rockwell: Connecticut soldiers in the Revolutionary War
by Frederick T Lawton
 Unknown Binding: Pages (1954)

Asin: B0007HZJKW
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

27. The descendants of John Kelsey, 1695-1780, of Shirley, Massachusetts
by Frederick Tyler Lawton
 Unknown Binding: Pages (1952)

Asin: B0006CR4UG
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

28. The role and responsibility of the advocate: Being a public lecture
by Frederick Lawton
 Unknown Binding: 11 Pages (1966)

Asin: B0007J72ZU
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

29. Tyler families of early Branford, Connecticut: Lineage of Joel Ford Tyler (1802-1878) of North Haven, Conn. and Oswego, New York
by Frederick Tyler Lawton
 Unknown Binding: Pages (1951)

Asin: B0007HZ9DY
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

30. The Emperor Frederick III and the crown prince
by Joseph Lawton
 Unknown Binding: 147 Pages (1888)

Asin: B00089M7JK
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

31. Bluffing Mr. Churchill (Frederick Troy Novels)
by John Lawton
Paperback: 416 Pages (2004-11-30)
list price: US$7.99 -- used & new: US$195.86
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0143034324
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
With his Frederick Troy series, John Lawton has been compared to such top historical espionage writers as John le Carré and Len Deighton. Now, in this prequel to Black Out, Lawton transports readers to 1941 London during the German Blitz, brilliantly re-creating the era of ration tickets, air raids, and bomb shelters.

Wolfgang Stahl, an American spy operating undercover as an SS officer, has fled Germany with Hitler’s secret blueprints for the invasion of Russia. As American, British, and German operatives race through war-torn London in search of the spy, bodies begin to pile up and the question arises: Are Stahl and his American contact being played by one of their own? In this game of spy vs. spy, only Sergeant Troy of Scotland Yard will be shrewd enough to uncover the truth. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (10)

3-0 out of 5 stars Sort of disjointed and confusing
A few years ago, a book titled Black Out came to my attention. I read it, and enjoyed it a great deal. It dealt with a young Scotland Yard inspector, Frederick Troy, and his investigation of some murders during the Second World War. It was fascinating. Author Lawton released a sequel a few years later. This third book is an attempt at a prequel, and frankly it's pretty uneven, though some of the characters are interesting, and the atmosphere is wonderful.

Troy is still wet behind the ears, and so he's not the main character. Instead, we have an American army officer, Cal McCormack, and his Special Branch partner, "Stinker" Stilton. They're chasing a German officer who's been spying on the Nazis, and reporting to the American army (in the person of McCormack) for some time. It's the middle of 1941, the Germans are triumphant everywhere, and the spy has apparently arrived in London, but he's in hiding, and no one knows why. When Stilton and McCormack start looking for him, things get dangerous pretty quickly, and soon the bodies begin to pile up.

I can't go into why the plot didn't work for me in this book without telling you too much of it. Suffice to say that the story takes a long while to get going, and events that you would think would be a starting place for the plot take place two thirds the way through the book. Troy begins to figure in the plot seriously later in the story, also.

Some of the characters and plot in the book relate to Lawton's other, later books. One character who appears very briefly at the beginning, and then in the last pages, does things that won't make much sense to people who haven't read his other books, and would give away plot points in one of the other books, if you read this book first--which you'd be inclined to do, considering this is supposed to be a prequel.

As I said in the beginning though, the atmosphere of the story is wonderful, and the characters add to it beautifully. That part of the story is well-done, and if you can just ignore the disjointed plot you'll be OK.

5-0 out of 5 stars Fun Read.
I like John Lawton's mysteries. They are a fun read and interesting period pieces. The war is well depicted and mood thats set seems authentic.

4-0 out of 5 stars On the Cusp of Disaster
It's the end of winter 1941, the Blitz may just have come to an end, but most of Europe is now under the thumbs of the Germans.It appears to everyone that Hitler has turned his eyes to the East.An american agent in Germany has gotten out just ahead of the Gestapo.Most likely he is headed to England, but only one man (an American Captain who is his handler) will be able to track him down.

While looking for his agent, the American Captain (Calvin Cormack) gets involved with both the Special Branch and the Murder Squad of Scotland Yard.There's a lot going on and we get a real feel for what people suffered during the Blitz and rationing.We also get to learn a lot a lot about the sex-life of Station Sergeant Kitty Stilton (more than most of us care to read about).The woman is really doing her part to keep up the morale (but not the morals) of as many men in uniform that she can.

This is a good entry in the series, and we meet many of the people who were in the first two novels, but at earlier times.It could have been better and the original title of "Riptide" makes a lot more sense than this one, which makes not sense at all.But write a letter to the american publishers.

Zeb Kantrowitz

4-0 out of 5 stars Atmospheric thriller set in the London of 1941
This is my first read of the "Inspector Troy" series which I gather has many fans.

The time is 1941. An Austrian close to SS factotum Reinhard Heydrich is a spy for the Americans and about to be uncovered. Hurriedly, he fakes his death in an air raid and runs. To where, we don't yet know.

Calvin Cormack, a U.S. Army intelligence officer in Zurich is told to go to London. In London, Cormack, the son of a Congressman who is against American involvement in Europe, is teamed with Walter Stilton, a seemingly plodding Special Branch Inspector.

Stahl, the fugitive Austrian, is in England: so Cormack believes.

The search by Stilton and Cormack begins and the bodies start dropping soon enough. Cormack is drawn into the family life of Stilton and Lawton weaves a plot that beautifully brings in English life, American politics and the family of Freddie Troy. Troy is a homicide detective for Scotland Yard.

Lawton does a nice job of sketching out his characters. Interestingly, Troy plays an almost secondary role, although he is the ultimate hero of the book. The novel does move along nicely, but it is so laden with detail that it does seem to slow down from time to time.

Overall, Lawton does a wonderful job of creating the atmosphere of 1941 London. The characters are all believable, the story more complex on a personal level than most mysteries and the plot doesn't have any disturbing jumps. Overall, a very entertaining read.

Jerry

3-0 out of 5 stars Good on atmosphere, but the characters & plot didn't grab me
I haven't read any of the other Inspector Troy novels; I picked up this one because the jacket's reviews were attractive.I realize now that the review excerpts focused on what I liked about the book (its terrific recreation of a time & place) and were silent on what didn't grab me (the characters & plot).

It's almost worth reading just for the "feel."This is what it must've been like to sit around the kitchen table of a middle-class London policeman in Spring of 1941.

But while the novel is literate and well-written, there's something distancing about it.I found Troy the less interesting and less sharply delineated of the two major characters (Troy and an American soldier, Cal Cormack), and Lawton spends much more time on Cormack.The spy / murder-mystery plot plays out without much momentum; better are the glimpses of the internal politics of the police force and diplomatic services.

I expect I'd like Bluffing Mr. Churchill much more if I already had some investment in the continuing characters.I doubt I'll hunt out the other books in the series. ... Read more


32. A Little White Death
by John Lawton
Paperback: 448 Pages (2007-02-08)
list price: US$12.00 -- used & new: US$3.83
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0802142907
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description

The latest novel from the master spy novelist John Lawton follows Inspector Troy, now Scotland Yard’s chief detective, deep into a scandal reminiscent of the infamous Profumo affair.
England in 1963 is a country set to explode. The old guard, shocked by the habits of the war baby youth, sets out to fight back. The battle reaches uncomfortably close to Troy. While he is on medical leave, the Yard brings charges against an acquaintance of his, a hedonistic doctor with a penchant for voyeurism and young women, two of whom just happen to be sleeping with a senior man at the Foreign Office as well as a KGB agent.
But on the eve of the verdict a curious double case of suicide drags Troy back into active duty. Beyond bedroom acrobatics, the secret affairs now stretch to double crosses and deals in the halls of power, not to mention murder. It’s all Troy can do to stay afloat in a country immersed in drugs, up to its neck in scandal.
... Read more

Customer Reviews (10)

5-0 out of 5 stars Stunning book
Another winner from John Lawton. His books are issued in wrong order, or he wrote them set in different times, I am not sure . Anyway, these richly textured, multy-layered novels are feast for the soul. Nothing is simple ahd easily guessed in his books. People wear masks, there are secrets and deceit on every step. Commander Freddie Troy tries to find the truth in this mess. England in 1960's is a turbulent place, everything is changing. There isn't much difference between good and bad guys, or they switch roles on regular basis. Stunning book by this reclusive author. No wonder he avoids limelight if his view of the world is his work.

4-0 out of 5 stars This Novel Never Goes Where You Expect it To
One of the great things about John Lawton is that his 'Troy' novels never go where you expect them to go.That's not to say that they are irrational or that they jump around or throw things out at you just to confuse the issue.Lawton never sinks to the level of throwing in a couple of 'red herrings' just to make things interesting.As things unfold, and sometimes not what you expect, they do make sense in a linear way.

At one point late in the book, he has a character make a mistake that even the character (and me too) doesn't realize.It takes Troy a while to figure it out, but figure it out he does.How he (Lawton) plays out the complex conspiracy is something to behold, and will keep most people guessing until the end.

There is only one flaw in the book to my analysis, and that is a character who becomes something of an obsession to Troy, never has a final rendering, but just drops off the map.It's this one loose end that for me keeps this from being a perfect novel.Also, the prelude and epilogue are meant to wrap up the novel like bookends, but have so little to do with the real story, that they are like using "Hello Kitty" bookends to hold up your leather bound "Shakespeare" collection.

4-0 out of 5 stars Suspense Wrapped In A Character-Study Novel
I read this book not knowing the history of Chief Inspector Troy and his other adventures. I picked this up cold because a friend recommended the style. The friend was right. "A Little White Death" seems to go nowhere at first, but the writing is so rich and character so interesting, I was drawn right in. A little drawn out? Perhaps. Once the plot starts rocking along, which it does, I think it could come to a faster conclusion. But this is a terrific character study set in a fascinating time. "A Little White Death" shows there really are no rules to structure. Now I need to go back to the beginning and find out more.

2-0 out of 5 stars A walk down memory lane
A walk down memory lane as Lawton visits his old characters and his old plots (including that of C.P. Snow's "Strangers and Brothers").Bit of a bore.

5-0 out of 5 stars Another Lawton Jackpot.
Perhaps Lawton is an aquired taste - his books are long on atmosphere and the minutia of life in post war Britain but if you lived through these trying times you would know how well he portrays what was left of the class system, the "old boy" network and the idiocy of British politics. Once you have the taste of his books they become as addictive as chocolate and almost as much fun. Detective Troy is both severely human and astonishingly clever and Lawton paints him in glorious technicolor. He's a rogue, a magnet for beautiful women and not beyond bending the law almost to breaking point.
Readers should start with "Bluffing Mr. Churchill" and finish with "A Little White Death" and they, as I, will be totally in thrall.
Please Mr. Lawton if you are reading this, give us an encore!

... Read more


33. Riptide
by John Lawton
Paperback: 416 Pages (2002-04-18)
list price: US$12.71 -- used & new: US$8.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0752847899
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
Spring 1941. In Germany, after ten years spying for the Americans, Wolfgang Stahl disappears during a Berlin air raid. The Germans think he's dead. The British know he's not. But where is he? MI6 convince US Intelligence that Stahl will head for London, and so Captain Cal Cormack, a shy American 'aristocrat', is teamed with Chief Inspector Stilton of Stepney, fat, fifty, and convivial, and between them they scour London, a city awash with spivs and refugees. But then things start to go terribly wrong and, ditched by MI6 and disowned by his embassy, Cal is introduced to his one last hope - Sgt Troy of Scotland Yard... ... Read more

Customer Reviews (2)

5-0 out of 5 stars Same book as Bluffing Mr. Churchill
I love this author's Frederick Troy novels, therefore I purchased all of them.Imagine my disappointment when this book was the SAME book as Bluffing Mr. Churchill as novel I had purchased as being the first Troy novel, and I like to read a series from start to finish.Wow, I started reading and, thought this sure sounds familiar!!And, it is the same novel???Why did they publish this with two different names?Very frustrating.Be aware if you are a new fan of the Troy mysteries that you don't want to waste your money!!

5-0 out of 5 stars A Ripping Read
This is a fine absorbing read.The Writer of this review has lived through the Blitz in England (the background to this novel) and it feels authentic. But really it is one of those books you would like to read at a sitting. An American (Cal) in England finds himself working with Walter Stilton (a working classChief Inspector) whoin their joint search for an American spy in Lodon, share many interesting and humorous cultural exchanges.Cal's introduction toEnglish tea is one example. I frequently found myself laughing out loud.There is also a fast paced and humorous sexual thread. Sgt Troy of Scotland Yard, a central figure in earlier novels, makes a lowerkey appearance. The story is fast, the action believable, the comments on life during the blitz accurate and altogether this is the most enjoyable, moving and tense novel I have read for many a long time. ... Read more


34. Flesh Wounds: An Inspector Troy Novel (A Black cat book)
by John Lawton
Paperback: 352 Pages (2006-01-11)
list price: US$12.00 -- used & new: US$6.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0802142303
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
Praised for their riveting, ingenious plot twists, John Lawton's series of espionage thrillers featuring Chief Inspector Frederick Troy of Scotland Yard have an uncanny ability to place readers in the thick of history. Now in Flesh Wounds, an old flame has returned to Troy's life: Kitty Stilton, wife of an American presidential hopeful. Private eye Joey Rork has been hired to make sure Kitty's amorous liaisons with a rat pack crooner don't ruin her husband's political career. But he also wants to know why Kitty has been spotted with Danny Ryan, whose twin brothers, in addition to owning one of London's hottest jazz clubs, are said to have inherited the crime empire of fallen mobster Alf Marx. Before Rork can find out, he meets a gruesome end. And he isn't the only one: bodies have started turning up around London, dismembered in the same bizarre and horrifying way. Is it possible that the blood trail leads back to Troy's own police force and into Troy's own forgotten past? Flesh Wounds, a compulsively readable thriller, finds one of our most able storytellers at the height of his game. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (7)

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent addition to a series...
I don't usually review back list books because no one really wants to know about a book published five years ago. On the other hand, John Lawton's "Flesh Wounds" is a wonderful piece of his on-going Inspector Troy series, begun ten or so years ago. I reviewed for Vine Lawton's latest, "A Lily of the Field" a couple of weeks ago. I enjoyed the book, but felt I had rather entered a story-in-progress. I decided to order Lawton's back list and try to discover who was who, who killed who, who slept with who, and the many other "who", "what", and "when" questions raised by "Lily".

"Flesh Wounds", set first in London of 1944 and finishing up in London of 1959. Rather different times for both the city and its citizens. Frederick Troy - a policeman in the last years of the war - has ascended to chief superintendent of "the Yard". (That's "New Scotland Yard" to you and me, the headquarters of the Metropolitan Police.) The post-war years in England had seen a rise in crime, as well as an almost continuing Tory government. Labour was itching to regain power after two straight electoral defeats, and Troy's brother, Sir Rod Troy was a shadow Labour minister. The Troy's, a family whose father had emigrated from Russia in the early part of the 20th century, were a wealthy family, represented in government, newspaper, and police circles. There are also a set of really crazy twin daughters in the family.

There was another crazy set ofgangster twins - this pair was male - who were partaking of a crime spree in London. Part of Frederick Troy's job is to arrest the Ryan brothers, suspects in several brutal crimes.
But Frederick Troy doesn't have this story all to himself. Complicating his life are several women - both past and current lovers - as well as many police officers and officials working with Troy. Lawton juggles many on-going stories brilliantly. His story-telling and character development is excellent. This is a real winner of a novel, looking back and forward to an England of 50 years ago.

5-0 out of 5 stars Unique series
This is the fifth installment in the Frederick Troy series. Troy is a London homicide detective of Russian heritage - his father an immigrant who became a very powerful and wealthy newspaper publisher. The series takes place between the 1930's and the sixties and although there is a chronology to these books, the series doesn't follow a calendar. Also several of the books, including this one, have been published under different titles, i.e. same book, different title depending on if it's the British or American version.

I have not run across many folks who are familiar with this series which is unfortunate - these are great books - Flesh Wounds or Blue Rondo - being no exception.The books are historically based mysteries with historic figures - for instance Eisenhower makes an appearance in this one - and follow the events of the time. Our hero Troy is somewhat of a lone wolf on the police force - jaded just enough to be both pragmatic and at times very funny but personable, politically savvy and competent enough to climb the promotion ladder. He's the Chief Superintendent in this one.

There's also a supporting cast of characters - Troy's family, his friends and co-workers, including a distant cousin of Winston Churchill - who are well developed and engaging on their own. The books are a blend of mystery, police procedural and political intrigue, all handled extremely well by the author. Lastly, much like Charles McCarry's books, there is a lot of sex in this series and there's even more bed-hopping in this book than its predecessors - including one brief but bizarre and somewhat disturbing scene.

Flesh Wounds begins with a brief flashback to 1944 and war-time London and then moves forward to 1959. Troy finds himself embroiled in case in which the London East End underworld is in transition as a more violent group of Young Turks are supplanting their older predecessors. Troy and his cohorts get knocked around a bit and find themselves not only dealing with this new breed of criminals but also the same old corrupt politicians - but they come out on top in the end.

A very good book and highly recommended although - and I seem to be saying this with more and more frequency - I wouldn't start here simply because you miss a lot of Troy's history - specifically familial - if you haven't read the earlier books.

4-0 out of 5 stars Jam Today, Jam Tomorrow, Jam Forever(Blue Rondo)
For those who are uninitiated, this book was originally published in England as "Blue Rondo" the title that makes more sense.Maybe it's because Lawton's books are always so 'literary' (no pun intended) that when I find sloppy editing and proofreading I tend to feel cheated.There are more mistakes (anachronisms) and failings in this book to list them all.Some of them are as follows:

No matter how drunk an American is, he or she would never NEVER spell favor with a "u" ie. favour.

There is not now or then (1959) a 103rd congressional district in New York or any state.There is a 103rd Assembly District in New York for the lower house of the New York State Legislature, but that would make Mr. Goldblatt an Assemblyman, not a Congressman.

No one in 1959 would ever say, "this will be the mother of all..." because the phrase was coined by Saddam Hussein to warn off the allies from attacking him and his Republican Guard, i.e. the mother of all battles.If you are going to write a period story, write it right.

Ok, now I'm done complaining and explaining why I only gave this story a four.Other reasons are everyone, and I do mean everyone, running around London, screwing everyone else.It sounds more like the 'lost generation' of the twenties/thirties or the 'free love' generation of the sixties, than the 'staid' fifties.

I'll grant Lawton the language, but I really wonder if his books need all the sex, promiscuity, adulterous affairs, homosexuality, incest (I mean INCEST) come on, how badly do you want to shock your readers or are you just bored!Let's face it, this stuff goes way back to Victorian times when everyone slept with their sister and brother or buggered everyone's brother in 'school' (the true old school tie).SO WHAT.It added nothing to the story or plot.Could it be gratuitous?Quite!

So what we have is a good story that's just a little too bloody and has too many shoot-outs for an english noir, but it could have used an editor with a stronger hand.

Zeb Kantrowitz

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent book, but note - this is actually UK book "Blue Rondo"
The strange thing with the Inspector Troy books is that they get different titles when they're released in the US to when they originally come out in the UK. So, if you're from the UK and excited that to find a new Inspector Troy story you're sorely mistaken -- this book was originally called "Blue Rondo" and was first published in paperback in 2005. Why the title "Blue Rondo" is unsuitable for an American audience I don't know.

But with that out of the way, "Flesh Wounds"/"Blue Rondo" is one of my favourites of the Troy books. Over time, we've got to love the characterisation, Police Surgeon Kolanciwicz is one of the foulest-mouthed people I've come across, but is hilarious to read, and Troy's attitude to most people seems to be that they can go and get lost.

The best so far.

5-0 out of 5 stars excellant piece of the puzzle
John Lawton has created a thought provoking detective series
set in the UK during/after World War 2.He does a fine job at
developing/solving the crimes.He excels at weaving the social costs of the War into his stories.This is both informative and thought provoking.Be prepared for sex. ... Read more


35. Old Flames
by John Lawton
Kindle Edition: 512 Pages (2010-09-02)
list price: US$10.00
Asin: B0041OTAI4
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
Old Flames is a riveting spy novel sparked by historicalevents, with a twisting, turning plot that The Sunday Times (London)declares "a strange, thoughtful, quiet, intelligent spellbinder of abook, penetrating the very heart of betrayal." It is April 1956 at theheight of the Cold War: Khrushchev and Bulganin, leaders of the SovietUnion, are in Britain on an official visit. Chief Inspector Troy ofScotland Yard, son of a distinguished Russian emigre, is assigned tobe Khrushchev's bodyguard and to spy on him. Soon after, a Royal Navydiver is found dead and mutilated beyond recognition in PortsmouthHarbor. What was he doing under the hull of Khrushchev's ship, and whosent him there? Is the corpse that of Arnold Cockerell, a furnituresalesman with a mysterious source of income and a bizarre fetish forscuba gear, or did Cockerell fake his own death to escape an unknownnemesis? To find the answers, Inspector Troy must venture into theheart of the M16. He encounters the trifling bureaucrats of ScotlandYard, fellow officers who may be sleeping with the enemy, andseductive identical twins. Meanwhile cold-blooded killings havestarted to follow him wherever he goes. Is it possible that theexecutioner is a fellow policeman-or, worse still, an old friend? In aworld where secret codes lead to hidden Swiss bank accounts and anentire nation struggles to makes sense of itself in the wake of war,can anyone be trusted? Brilliantly evoking the atmosphere of the ColdWar and London in the 1950s, Old Flames is a thrilling adventure ofintrigue and suspense. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (12)

5-0 out of 5 stars And I thought the 1950s were boring...
I actually contemplated calling in sick to stay home from work and finish this book.That is high praise indeed.Other reviewers have recounted the plot twists and turns. Why did I find this book so compelling?First, Lawton's evocation of place.I now live in a city where it rarely rains, but I remember summer downpours in England, when the rain bounces off the pavement soaking you from below as well as from above.Lawton brought that back to me.He also beautifully conveyed the strangeness and tranquility of "the vast Georgian pile that was Mimram House," Troy's country estate.Second, Frederick Troy is my favorite kind of protagonist: flawed and perfectly believeable. He is cynical, sexy, smart, gullible,and rebellious. He also has a wacky family as a supporting cast, including weird and creepy twin sisters.Lawton does a better job with male characters than with female characters.I actually detested Tosca and couldn't wait for something bad to happen to her (not that I'm saying it does...). Third, I was fascinated by the historical context -- post-War, Cold War Britain, which was so different from the United States. I always wondered how spies like Kim Philby were recruited and what motivated them. Now I know.I cannot wait to read the other books in Lawton's Frederick Troy series.I need to go back to "Black Out" and find out what happened to Diana Brack.

4-0 out of 5 stars First Rate Historical Thriller
I like books that have a sense of time and place. "Old Flames" has both in plenty. The book takes place at a time when the world was still fascinated by happenings in the Soviet Union. Khrushchev visits the UK and a supposed undercover operation sets murder in motion. Inspector Troy spends a night out on a pub crawl with the Soviet Leader, while a former "flame" reappears - Larissa Tosca. Troy navigates the demands of family and politics in a novel steeped in atmosphere. The cold war is just beginning; the British Empire is in its wanning last days, and the Soviet Union is a power to be reckoned with. Troy is a character utterly unimpressed by position and power, and he solves crimes no matter who may get "dirtied" along the way. Troy is also fairly a-moral and completely a-political, which makes him the perfect character to be in the midst of a political thriller.

I like John Lawton quite a lot. The Inspector Troy series is hard to follow (heck, Troy himself changes jobs many times inthe course of the series). The books extend from WW II to the early 1960', but the novels were not published in order. To make matters worse, his books are published under different titles in the UK and the US. Arrrrgh. Nonetheless, Troy is a unique and enjoyable character - well worth the effort of sorting the books and publication dates out. The novels are all set in London, ranging from t he 1940's to the 1960's. There is a significant amount of historical material - and quite a bit of historical license as well. These are, after all , novels. I highly recommend this book, and all of the other Inspector Troy books.

3-0 out of 5 stars Blow too hard on embers and you get cinders in your eyes, not flames
This would have been a great book had Lawton removed about 100 pages and stuck to the main story more.Having said that, the story itself is a good one and says alot about England in the middle 1950s, dealing with the loss of Empire and the destruction to their infrastructure in WWII.

Frederick Troy, who we met during WWII in "Black Out" is now an inspector and head of the 'Murder Squad' at Scotland Yard.His brother Roy, is a Labour MP, and shadow Foreign Minister.When a need for a russian speaker to 'assist' Special Branch in listening in on Kruschev during a 1956 visit, comes about, Troy is convinced to help out.Here is where a lot of the story could have been cut.

When the Russians claim that they were under surveillance by a frogman, his body doesn't turn up for five months.When Troy is asked by his 'widow' to prove the body isn't that of her husband, a series of events begin to enfold that will lead Troy to revelations he wished he never had to uncover.To say more would give away the best part of the story, which is well developed and presented in a believable manner.

Lawton, also has the distracting habit of putting ideas into the mouths of this characters that would be prescient if the book was written in 1956, but since it was written in 1995, the only ones who would be amazed are the other characters in the book (so why do it?).Lastly I find Lawton's treatment of heterosexual sex, and especially his ideas as to how woman look at sex to be a cross between Nabokov and a twelve year old.When reading some of his scenes, I have come to wonder if the man has ever had sex with a woman, or to that matter anyone other than himself. Just MHO.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Powerful Slow-Burner
I came late to this book. I'd read the one that came first (Black Out) and the one that comes after (White Death). This is the best of the three. But if you're reading it for the thrills you're wasting your time. Reading Lawton for thrills or worse for the 'whodunnit' is like reading Kurt Vonnegut and complaining that his sci-fi is nothing like Star Wars.Who dun it isn't even on the map. These books are the most sophisticated literary historicals to come out of England in 25 years. His dialogue fizzles, his metaphors meander, his characters bring history roaring to life.Old Flames takes as its plot the events of 1956 - when Britain invaded Egypt - a low tide in the Special Relationship between Britain and Uncle Sam. This is 2004. What, in letters 8 miles high, could be more topical?

5-0 out of 5 stars slow start but a sprint at the end
i read a few espionage novels each year, in amidst many mystery/police procedural novels. this is the best in the past few years. i liked a recently read alan furst novel, but i'd have to say this one was more satisfying. furst is good. lawton is very good. i didn't know the history, so the author's liberty with it didn't bother me. but i enjoyed the history and the author explains at the end that while he takes some liberties, he's not distorted events.

more cerebral than deighton; akin to le carre. ... Read more


36. Black Out: A Novel
by John Lawton
 Hardcover: 352 Pages (1995-05-01)
list price: US$22.95 -- used & new: US$33.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 067085767X
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
Investigating a series of brutal murders that target German refugee scientists as a means of cracking the Nazi atomic rocketry program, young Detective Sergeant Frederick Troy becomes enmeshed in a conspiracy by the OSS. A first novel. 35,000 first printing. $35,000 ad/promo.Amazon.com Review
Just out in paperback, this terrific thriller by a Britishfilmmaker begins in WWII London, where a well-connected young policeofficer named Frederick Troy tries to find out why scientists workingon a secret project are disappearing and dying. Their fate hassomething to do with one of the nastier villains in recent fiction, arogue American OSS agent, but it isn't until the war is over that Troydiscovers the truth in ruined Berlin. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (23)

5-0 out of 5 stars Great beginning of a fine mystery series
I recently reread John Lawton's mystery novel, "Black Out," with the same enjoyment experienced some years back on the first time around.The book's protagonist, police sergeant Freddy Troy, is a continuously interesting creation who comes from a well-described privileged British background.More interesting to me, was the care that the author takes to describe the environment of war-time London with all of its grit and stress.The book's storyline has been criticized by some reviewers as too dependent on coincidences in Troy's family/personal life and his work as a detective sergeant, but I don't think that the device is overdone.One of author Lawton's purposes in this book, and others that follow in the series, is social critique which is often focused on the irresponsbile or uncivil behavior of British upper and middle-classes.
In any event, what the reader gets in "Black Out" is a first-rate detective/spy story set in a wholly believable WWII context with well-drawn characters and plenty of action.The books in the Freddy Troy series that follow "Black Out" are worthy of any mystery lover's attention.

4-0 out of 5 stars A Tale of World War Two
This book is actually in two parts; the first takes place in London just before D-Day, and then in 1948 Berlin during the airlift.The first part which takes up 80% of the book is almost a prelude to the second part (which explains a lot of why things happened in the first part).

During the first part, Frederick (Freddie) Troy the second son of a Russian ex-pat and English Baronet, is a sargeant in the Metropolitan Police Murder Squad.During early 1944 he manages to get cut with a ax, beat up, blinded, concussed, shot and bombed twice.(His brother who is in the airforce and is decorated multiple times, never gets a scratch.)

He also ends up having affairs with two diametrically opposed woman; a posh six foot tall member of the english aristocracy, and a five foot italian-american sargeant in the OSS.Along with his partner/assistant Constable (PC) Wildeve, he also manages to solve a couple of murders and bring one murderer to justice, while another gets away.

The second part that takes place mostly in Berlin, has too many spoilersto mention, but involves all of the loose ends from the first part. It's a very enjoyable story, as long as you can overlook some of the coincidences.


4-0 out of 5 stars An ExcellentRead
The novel is set in London at the end of the Second World War. Unlike many of the novels in the mystery genre, Lawton takes great pains to carefully develop the setting of his story as well as the characters that make up this wonderful tapestry of a novel. He carefully lays the story out for the reader and shows richness in his ability to tell a story. I learned to adjust to the spellings that are part of the Englsh, rather than the American Language as well as some the humor that is wry. The action moves along well and this is a truly enjoyable read.

2-0 out of 5 stars Really Terrible Stuff
Lawton's debut novel is a dud.The writing style is stilted, dry, and forced.The characters are two-dimensional, and the plot is boring and tainted with anti-American sentiment.Many times during my reading of this book, I almost put it down--but because I didn't have another book on hand, I kept forcing myself on.

Our hero, Sgt Troy, sleeps with two female characters (essentially the only women in the book) while doing precious little detective work.He somehow manages to solve the entire case while getting bombed and shot a few times.I couldn't bring myself to finish it.This is such a poor effort!

5-0 out of 5 stars Great thriller
I originally bought this book for my dad - he served as a GI in
London from 1943-46 and is a real history buff. He was crazy about
it, said it's the most convincing depiction of the place and the time
he's ever read. So I pointed out the 'big mistake' over the WAC, and
he said it was dumb but minor, after all Lawton had the clothes, the
music, the food all right - even had the name of the head waiter at a
London night club right, and that was amazing - how does anyone dig
up stuff like that? So, atmospheric? sure, detailed? sure, but it's
also a classy thriller, a plot that just rips along.So I read it
too, and more than that I read the two sequels and the good news is
they get better and better. This guy is good. They don't come much
better.
B Clark, Carthage. ... Read more


37. Balzac (Webster's French Thesaurus Edition)
by Icon Group
Digital: 355 Pages (2008-09-18)
list price: US$28.95 -- used & new: US$28.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B001O2NBVS
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
This edition is written in English. However, there is a running French thesaurus at the bottom of each page for the more difficult English words highlighted in the text. There are many editions of Balzac. This edition would be useful if you would like to enrich your French-English vocabulary, whether for self-improvement or for preparation in advanced of college examinations. Webster's edition of this classic is organized to expose the reader to a maximum number of difficult and potentially ambiguous English words. Rare or idiosyncratic words and expressions are given lower priority compared to “difficult, yet commonly used” English words. Rather than supply a single translation, many words are translated for a variety of meanings in French, allowing readers to better grasp the ambiguity of English without using the notes as a pure translation crutch. Having the reader decipher a word's meaning within context serves to improve vocabulary retention and understanding. Each page covers words not already highlighted on previous pages. This edition is helpful to French-speaking students enrolled in an English Language Program (ELP), an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) program, an English as a Second Language Program (ESL), or in a TOEFL® or TOEIC® preparation program. Students who are actively building their vocabularies in French or English may also find this useful for Advanced Placement® (AP®) tests. TOEFL®, TOEIC®, AP® and Advanced Placement® are trademarks of the Educational Testing Service which has neither reviewed nor endorsed this book. This book is one of a series of Webster's paperbacks that allows the reader to obtain more value from the experience of reading. Translations are from Webster's Online Dictionary, derived from a meta-analysis of public sources, cited on the site. ... Read more


38. Balzac (Webster's Portuguese Thesaurus Edition)
by Icon Group International
Digital: 353 Pages (2009-05-07)
list price: US$28.95 -- used & new: US$28.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B002C9F11U
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
This edition is written in English. However, there is a running Portuguese thesaurus at the bottom of each page for the more difficult English words highlighted in the text. There are many editions of Balzac. This edition would be useful if you would like to enrich your Portuguese-English vocabulary, whether for self-improvement or for preparation in advanced of college examinations. Webster's edition of this classic is organized to expose the reader to a maximum number of difficult and potentially ambiguous English words. Rare or idiosyncratic words and expressions are given lower priority compared to "difficult, yet commonly used" English words. Rather than supply a single translation, many words are translated for a variety of meanings in Portuguese, allowing readers to better grasp the ambiguity of English without using the notes as a pure translation crutch. Having the reader decipher a word's meaning within context serves to improve vocabulary retention and understanding. Each page covers words not already highlighted on previous pages. This edition is helpful to Portuguese-speaking students enrolled in an English Language Program (ELP), an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) program, an English as a Second Language Program (ESL), or in a TOEFL® or TOEIC® preparation program. Students who are actively building their vocabularies in Portuguese or English may also find this useful for Advanced Placement® (AP®) tests. TOEFL®, TOEIC®, AP® and Advanced Placement® are trademarks of the Educational Testing Service which has neither reviewed nor endorsed this book. This book is one of a series of Webster's paperbacks that allows the reader to obtain more value from the experience of reading. Translations are from Webster's Online Dictionary, derived from a meta-analysis of public sources, cited on the site. ... Read more


39. Three artists of Alaska: Fred and Sara Machetanz (Alaskana series)
by Joseph Lawton
 Unknown Binding: 78 Pages (1965)

Asin: B0007GYQNO
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

40. Her secret world
by Stanley Lawton
 Unknown Binding: 392 Pages (1947)

Asin: B0007FGPH0
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

  Back | 21-40 of 43 | Next 20
A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

Prices listed on this site are subject to change without notice.
Questions on ordering or shipping? click here for help.

site stats