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$9.95
1. Biography - Lewis, (Harry) Sinclair
 
$1.90
2. Lewis, Sinclair (1885-1951): An
 
3. Arrowsmith / by Sinclair Lewis
 
4. Main street; the story of Carol
 
5. LONG ARM OF THE SMALL TOWN, A
 
6. ARROWSMITH.
 
7. Typed Contract Signed.
 
8. BABBITT.
 
$30.75
9. Babbitt
 
$25.29
10. Babbitt
 
11. Free air by Sinclair Lewis.
 
12. The job; an American novel. by
 
13. The innocents; a story for lovers.
 
14. Sinclair Lewis, 1885-1951 (Semblanzas
 
15. The trail of the hawk; a comedy
 
16. Main street.
 
17. Ann Vickers (Bison Book)
 
18. Sinclair Lewis (Modern Literature
$3.94
19. Babbitt (Signet Classics)
$16.48
20. Sinclair Lewis: Rebel from Main

1. Biography - Lewis, (Harry) Sinclair (1885-1951): An article from: Contemporary Authors
by Gale Reference Team
Digital: 21 Pages (2004-01-01)
list price: US$9.95 -- used & new: US$9.95
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Asin: B0007SDDQS
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Editorial Review

Product Description
This digital document, covering the life and work of (Harry) Sinclair Lewis, is an entry from Contemporary Authors, a reference volume published by Thompson Gale. The length of the entry is 6255 words. The page length listed above is based on a typical 300-word page. Although the exact content of each entry from this volume can vary, typical entries include the following information:

  • Place and date of birth and death (if deceased)
  • Family members
  • Education
  • Professional associations and honors
  • Employment
  • Writings, including books and periodicals
  • A description of the author's work
  • References to further readings about the author
... Read more

2. Lewis, Sinclair (1885-1951): An entry from SJP's <i>St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture</i>
by Bennett Lovett-Graff
 Digital: 1 Pages (2000)
list price: US$1.90 -- used & new: US$1.90
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Asin: B0027YVERA
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Editorial Review

Product Description
This digital document is an article from St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture, brought to you by GaleĀ®, a part of Cengage Learning, a world leader in e-research and educational publishing for libraries, schools and businesses.The length of the article is 214 words.The article is delivered in HTML format and is available in your Amazon.com Digital Locker immediately after purchase.You can view it with any web browser.Signed essays ranging from 500 to 2,500 words, written by subject experts and edited to form a consistent, readable, and straightforward reference. Entries include subject-specific bibliographies and textual cross-references to related essays. ... Read more


3. Arrowsmith / by Sinclair Lewis
by Sinclair (1885-1951) Lewis
 Hardcover: Pages (1925)

Asin: B002BAKEMQ
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4. Main street; the story of Carol Kennicott. by Sinlair Lewis
by Lewis. Sinclair. 1885-1951.
 Paperback: Pages (1921)

Asin: B002WTRKOQ
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5. LONG ARM OF THE SMALL TOWN, A CENTENARY EXHIBIT, SINCLAIR LEWIS 1885-1951.|THE
by none stated
 Paperback: Pages (1985-01-01)

Asin: B00266SFLC
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6. ARROWSMITH.
by Sinclair [1885 - 1951]. Lewis
 Hardcover: 392 Pages (1925)

Asin: B0000EF7QV
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7. Typed Contract Signed.
by Sinclair (1885-1951) LEWIS
 Unbound: Pages (1947-01-01)

Asin: B002CJ6E1G
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8. BABBITT.
by Sinclair [1885 - 1951]. Lewis
 Hardcover: Pages (1922)

Asin: B0014KLVKS
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9. Babbitt
by Lewis Sinclair 1885-1951
 Paperback: 410 Pages (2010-09-29)
list price: US$34.75 -- used & new: US$30.75
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1173247688
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10. Babbitt
by Lewis Sinclair 1885-1951
 Paperback: 416 Pages (2010-09-27)
list price: US$34.75 -- used & new: US$25.29
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1173085378
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11. Free air by Sinclair Lewis.
by Lewis. Sinclair. 1885-1951.
 Paperback: Pages (1919-01-01)

Asin: B002WU77GG
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12. The job; an American novel. by Sinclair Lewis.
by Lewis. Sinclair. 1885-1951.
 Paperback: Pages (1917-01-01)

Asin: B002WTVVVE
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13. The innocents; a story for lovers. by Sinclair Lewis.
by Lewis. Sinclair. 1885-1951.
 Paperback: Pages (1917-01-01)

Asin: B002WU23CO
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14. Sinclair Lewis, 1885-1951 (Semblanzas literarias)
by Bernice D Matlowsky
 Unknown Binding: Pages (1951)

Asin: B0007FRWG8
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15. The trail of the hawk; a comedy of the seriousness of life.
by Lewis. Sinclair. 1885-1951.
 Paperback: Pages (1915-01-01)

Asin: B002WU5CTK
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16. Main street.
by Lewis. Sinclair. 1885-1951.
 Paperback: Pages (1920-01-01)

Asin: B002WTVVWS
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17. Ann Vickers (Bison Book)
by Sinclair Lewis
 Paperback: 564 Pages (1994-04-01)
list price: US$15.00
Isbn: 0803279477
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description

Some reviewers were outraged by Ann Vickers when it first appeared in 1933. "Persons unused to horrid and filthy things had better stay at a safe distance from this book," wrote one. Lewis's Ann Vickers is a complex character: a strong-minded prison superintendent dedicated to enlightened social reform, she also seeks to fulfill herself as a sexual being. Ann Vickers is in all respects her own person, standing up to the confining rules of her society.
... Read more

Customer Reviews (6)

5-0 out of 5 stars Ann Vickers
I enjoyed the book very much.The condition of the book was excellent and the delivery fast.

4-0 out of 5 stars Classic Lewis
A good book not only in terms of characterization (Lewis's forte) but also in illuminating select issues of the time (1900s-1930s): women's suffrage, prison reform and the reality of "vice."

One of Ann/Lewis's strongest achievements is the argument that the nature of prisons essentially exacerbates the crime problem.Ann learns that due to ill-trained wardens/guards and poor conditions "Prison makes the man who enjoyed beating fellow drunks in a barroom come out wanting to kill a policeman" (272).However, like in many of Lewis's novels, a solution is presented.Once a prison superintendent herself Ann preaches the virtues of better trained and better paid employees, cleaner and more humane conditions and an extended parole program.While at times Ann's ultimate destiny feels a bit unrealistic, overall, a solid portrait is painted of possibilities of the New Woman of the early twentieth century.

3-0 out of 5 stars "I am mine own woman, well at ease."
This spicy novel (some called it sordid) is about an independent-minded woman from the rural Midwest who goes east to college, fights for woman's suffrage, and then becomes the head of an "industrial home" (prison), while at the same time falling in love with the wrong men, marrying and divorcing, having an abortion and then a child by another man out of wedlock, feeling lonely and inadequate, and suffering all the difficulties a modern (early twentieth century) woman in a whirlwind position might face. His views of Ann's sexual behavior - that sex is a positive force even outside of marriage and woman need and enjoy it as much as men - were considered quite forward at the time (some said scandalous). Indeed, the novel ends with Ann living openly with a man while both are still married to others awaiting their divorces, and Lewis depicts her as a fulfilled woman ("This is a new age," she declares). Disappointing is Lewis's refusal to take a position or monitor any of this so that we get the feeling by the end he believes anything goes, that all behavior is justified simply by doing it - which is interesting seeing that much of the novel involves prison reform as well. Yet despite all this "advancement" in sexual mores, it's in this novel that Lewis expresses a conservative bent for the first time (to be magnified greatly in the years to come): he satirizes the radical movement and even thinks the Depression a good thing because it reminds people how "noble" poverty is. So the messages become confusing and confused: unrestricted sex is good, but so are far more constraining elements in society. Coming right after DODSWORTH, this book marks a decided step downward in quality for Lewis, a downhill trend that would continue with each succeeding novel.

5-0 out of 5 stars When America writes books, she sounds like Sinclair Lewis
You are Ann Vickers "of Waubanakee, Illinois, a little south of the center of the state" ( Ch 1, p. 7). You are 17 years old. Your mother died when you were ten. You are an only child. Your father was local school superintendent. But he died a year ago leaving you a legacy of $1,000. What do you do next?

You draw on your father's and Waubanakee's values and walk with open eyes into the ripening American world ahead from 1907 to 1933. You wait tables to put yourself through Point Royal College for Women in Connecticut. You grow through the amorous advances of a lesbian roommate and a playboy male professor. You study nursing. You stuff envelopes for years so that American women can vote. You go to jail for the cause and later become an expert on women's prisons. You write a learned book and are a popular national columnist. You have made love to three men over the decades, had one abortion greatly regretted, and after age 40 joyfully birthed a son whose father may either be your cloying husband or a charming rogue who sits on the New York State supreme court until he is convicted of being on the take and sentenced to six years in jail. When the judge is pardoned by the Governor (FDR?) after only a year behind bars, you, he and your son plan to defy convention and make a life together.

You are the same Ann Vickers, onetime tomboy of Waubanakee, onetime devotee of the YWCA and Presbyterian Sunday School. You have taken things as they came your way, made your choices and lived with them. And you were written up in a novel by Sinclair Lewis which I defy a reader in 2005 to put down prematurely.

Themes in the novel to be pondered:

--A mother is persuaded by a professor of obstetrics to have an abortion she does not want and who dreams ever after of her "murdered" girl "Pride." A mother who will never murder Pride again and who knows that "coming children" have rights.

--A feminist who never despises men utterly. Most males are taken to be "solid, stolid, unpicturesque citizens who liked breakfast, went to their offices or shops or factories at seven or eight or nine, admired sports connected with the rapid propulsion of small balls ... quarreled with their wives and nagged their children yet were fond of them and for them chased prosperity..." ( Ch. 21, p. 256)

--A married liberal woman goes to parties and hears so much TALK in which people per Roget's Thesaurus "cry, roar, shout, bawl, halloo, whoop, yell, bellow, howl, scream, screech, screak, shriek, shrill, squeak ... yawp, vociferate ... rend the air..." (Ch. 35, p. 421f)

--Ann Vickers squeezes her lover's wife's hand when the judge is sentenced to jail. This is not the first novel in which Sinclair Lewis puts two women with claims on the same man face to face.

--America came of age in the early and middle lifetime of Ann Vickers. What a time! "Hijackers murdering bootleggers. ... Aviators crashing on cottages and burning up old ladies in them. Babies kidnaped and murdered. ... Methodist bishops accused of stock-gambling and rigging elections. ... Five-year-old boys in nice suburbs playing gangster and killing three-year-old boys. ... A skinny little Hindu that drinks only goat's milk baffling the whole British Empire. ... A nation of one hundred and twenty million people letting a few fanatics turn it from beer to poison gin." (Ch. 46, p. 541f)

See if you can resist temptation to read and love ANN VICKERS.

-OOO-

3-0 out of 5 stars Missing pages, uneven story=lesser Lewis novel
It's sort of amusing that I decided to read Sinclair Lewis's "Ann Vickers" considering the only other novel I have read from America's winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature was "Babbitt," and that one a few years ago. I couldn't tell you why I chose to read this 1933 novel rather than "Main Street," "Arrowsmith," "Elmer Gantry," or even "Kingsblood Royal." Any one of these four books would be the logical choice after reading "Babbitt." I'm nothing if I'm not contrary to people's expectations, so when I saw this book on the shelf at the library I snatched it up without a second thought and headed home to read it. The book, even at 560 pages, doesn't take that long to read as the font is large and the pages small. Nonetheless, it took me four days to get through the novel largely due to the outdated lingo and the uneven quality of the book. There are several reasons why you haven't heard of "Ann Vickers" before now, one of them being that moving through certain sections of the book feels like serving a ten-year sentence of hard labor at the local penitentiary. Overall, though, Lewis's scathing treatise on radical politics and feminism in the first third of the twentieth century is worth the effort.

Lewis follows the titular character from her earliest years as a resident of Waubanakee, Illinois to her emergence as a major reformer on the East Coast. Right from the start, we get the idea that Ann is different from the other little boys and girls. The only child of a college professor, Ann's social position is one of high standing and moderate wealth. Nonetheless, she soon falls under the spell of a fiery socialist German immigrant named Klebs. By the time Ann goes to college, she's well on the way to becoming a true extremist. She drops out of the Y.W.C.A. after learning to reject Christianity with the help of a radical professor. Vickers forms a socialist organization on campus, embarks on a forbidden relationship with a faculty member, and earns a decidedly unsavory reputation amongst her fellow students. After graduating, she joins the suffrage movement, an activity that requires her to deliver oratories on street corners, go to jail for organizing protests, and hobnob with prominent personalities. Vickers, like most leftist radicals, never stays with a single cause for long. After several stints as assistant superintendents at homes that teach the urban poor and new immigrants life skills, she sets out to work as a prison reformer. The best part of the book details Ann's struggles in a southern prison, where she battles unsanitary conditions, lackadaisical treatment of prisoners, capital punishment, and corruption.

Lewis is very careful to examine all aspects of his character's life. "Ann Vickers" constantly looks behind the rhetoric and politics in an effort to capture the emotional aspects of womanhood. Just because Ann is a radical doesn't mean she's cold to the idea of men. In fact, she has several relationships throughout her life, from a soldier during the First World War named Lafe Resnick to fellow radical Russell Spaulding to a corrupt New York judge named Barney Dolphin. Vickers's experiences with abortion, infidelity, and promiscuity fuel much of the narrative drive of the novel. Her experiences also cool her radical fire so that by the end of the book she's a determined liberal living out of wedlock with a disgraced member of the system. There's a great line at the end of the book where Lewis describes Ann as the "Captive Woman, the Free Woman, the Great Woman, the Feminist Woman, the Domestic Woman, the Passionate Woman, the Cosmopolitan Woman, the Village Woman-the Woman." In short, although he often disagrees with the hypocrisy of Ann and her methods, he does believe that conditions in America were changing enough that a female could now realize all aspects of her personality in both the private and public spheres.

The problems of the book are many. First, I've always believed I should support my state university's publishing house, but this University of Nebraska Press edition is an embarrassment. From pages 371 to 394, half of the pages are blank. Yep, someone let a Sinclair Lewis novel go to bookstore shelves without correcting this completely unacceptable blunder. Even worse, the missing pages start up during the best part of the story, when Ann Vickers works in the southern prison. A primal scream is in order here, but I'm hoping this mistake is specific to one copy and not to the entire run. Second, and more in tune to the actual novel, the first 100 pages of the story aren't very interesting. Vickers's childhood and college days reek of boredom. Only when the character heads out into the larger world and starts mixing it up does the book start to soar. Third, I often thought Ann an unpleasant character, especially when her marital machinations emerge towards the end of the story.

I think this last point, Ann's adultery, upsets me because I'm male. It's an unfair accusation for me to make, though, because men routinely leave their girlfriends and wives for other women in exactly the same way Vickers does. In any event, it's another example of what Lewis tries to say with the novel, that women now have the freedom to live their lives as they see fit. Ultimately, would I recommend "Ann Vickers"? I don't know. I think "Babbitt" light years ahead of this effort. I do believe "Ann Vickers" doesn't receive attention from today's leftist literati because Lewis viciously skewers the far left on nearly every page. Give it a shot if you're a Lewis fan or a moderate conservative who likes to see the leftist fringe occasionally take it on the chin. ... Read more


18. Sinclair Lewis (Modern Literature Monographs)
by James Lundquist
 Hardcover: 150 Pages (1972-12)
list price: US$19.95
Isbn: 0804425620
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19. Babbitt (Signet Classics)
by Sinclair Lewis
Mass Market Paperback: 416 Pages (2007-08-07)
list price: US$7.95 -- used & new: US$3.94
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0451530616
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
Since the 1922 publication of Babbitt, its eponymous anti-hero-a real estate broker and relentless social climber inhabiting a Midwestern town called Zenith-has become a symbol of stultifying values and middle class hypocrisy. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Experience
the book arrived on time and in great condition, wish this provider had all the books that I need. ... Read more


20. Sinclair Lewis: Rebel from Main Street
by Richard Lingeman
Paperback: 704 Pages (2005-06-15)
list price: US$24.95 -- used & new: US$16.48
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Asin: 0873515412
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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In this definitive biography of Sinclair Lewis (Main Street, Babbitt), Lingeman presents an empathetic, absorbing, and balanced portrait of an eccentric alcoholic-workaholic whose novels and stories exploded shibboleths with a volatile mixture of caricature and realism. Drawing on newly uncovered correspondence, diaries, and criticism, Lingeman gives new life to this prairie Mercutio out of Sauk Centre, Minnesota.
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Customer Reviews (5)

5-0 out of 5 stars A great find.
I actually stumbled into this book because of my interest in the art of Grant Wood.I purchased an old special edition of Main Street that was illustrated by Wood.After enjoying the illustrations, I decided that I might as well read the book.Well, that led to Babbitt and Elmer Gantry (with two more on order.)As I looked for Sinclair Lewis books, I saw this biography by Lingeman and was impressed by the great reviews (and the low price of used copies.)I decided to give it a try.In biographies, I mainly read about Victorian scientists but I have enjoyed a few political and artist's bio's. I did not know what I was in for with this incredibly interesting 554 page story of one of the most interesting people I can imagine.Lingeman is a master who combines an incredible amount of research with a writing style that will make you feel as if you are reading a page-turner of a novel.If you have read this far without buying the book of course you are interested in Sinclair Lewis so go ahead, buy the book, and enjoy it.

4-0 out of 5 stars Justice
Schorer's 1961 biography of Lewis, while well researched, came off as particularly mean-spirited. I could never understand why a biographer would take on the huge task ofan exhaustive biography when they seem to distain it's subject so much.
Finally Mr. Lingeman has given us a more even handed look at one of America's most neglected authors. Perhaps it was the great popularity of Lewis during the 1920's that brought about a more recent reaction against him but it seems that the time is ripe for another look at this most American of American authors and the Lingeman book makes that clear. This biography is clearly as in depth as Schorer's but, fortunately, does not have some strange axe to grind. Besides, the life of Sinclair Lewis makes for some interesting reading when it is put forth honestly.

5-0 out of 5 stars Interesting and enjoyable
Okay, I haven't read Mark Schorer's earlier biography, but I have read a number of other critical works about Lewis over the years, and more than half of Lewis' twenty-odd novels.

I found this book fascinating and insightful, and I was moved by Lingeman's final argument - that the time is ripe for a rediscovery of Lewis, that the "license to consider Lewis an irrelevant hack" that Schorer's book had conferred on the academic world is expired. I think it's criminal that Lewis is hardly even read in colleges today, while Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Cather, Faulkner, Steinbeck, etc., are still read and discussed in detail. (Nothing against these great writers, all of whom I've read extensively, but Lewis was there first and made all their paths to brilliance easier.)

As long as America is still loaded with familiar George Babbitts, Elmer Gantrys, Sam Dodsworths, Carol Kennicotts, etc., Lewis will be a classic (if not THE classic) American novelist. And Lingeman's biography presents a revealing picture of the unique, angry, ultimately lonely man behind these characters.

4-0 out of 5 stars After Schorer
As one of a diminishing number of whole-hearted Lewis enthusiasts in America, having read all of Lewis's novels except *Hike and the Aeroplane,* I have to say that Mark Schorer's biography of 1961 remains the standard. Lingeman does fill in details Schorer wouldn't or couldn't and adds some tangential specifics for which devotees such as I can be grateful. A meeting between F. Scott Fitzgerald and Lewis in 1922 is sketched in (but how does Lingeman know what they talked about after they closeted themselves with a bottle of gin?); we know more about (say) the circumstances surrounding Lewis's researches for *Gideon Planish,* and Lingeman gets down to the brief nitty-gritty of Lewis's sexual performance, but he has no fresh overall understanding, nor are his specifics brought into new focus, or any special focus. Instead, he builds upon Schorer's essential claim: Lewis's limitations and strengths as a writer are his commitment to surface; his refusal to look into himself comes from the painful and constricting boyhood that stunted the writer even as it enabled him.

I'd nominate Schorer's biography as a great one, qualifying my appraisal only by a parodying Hemingway on Gilbert Seldes: "It could only have been better if Sinclair Lewis had been better." The figure in the carpet, the consistent understanding that ties a book together, is vividly present on every page of Schorer. And unlike Lingeman, Schorer could talk with Lewis's two wives, plus Claude and Michael Lewis, Harry Maule, and Bennett Cerf; his account of Lewis's horrifying, seedy end in Italy is enlivened by portraits of the dermatologist Vincenzo Lapiccirella, the old servant whose refusal to discuss Lewis's alcoholism Schorer finds "engagingly reticent" (Schorer bristles with savage and delicious irony), and the enigmatic Alexander Manson. Beside Schorer, Lingeman is thin and pale, but if Lewis's fixing of quintessential American types and his sense of humor and sense of outrage appeal, you'll want to read his biography anyway, as I did.

5-0 out of 5 stars Highly readable, very informative
I had high hopes for this book before I started, and then had the rare pleasure of having those hopes surpassed.In this immensely readable biography, Lingeman brings us the Sinclair Lewis we have always wanted to admire, but perhaps never dared: the flawed, brash, idealistic cynic that put on the page a world as American as he was.Over and over I was struck by how relevent the world of Lewis was, and how like our own it continues to be.

Neither heavily academic, nor breezy and light, this biography does exactly what it is supposed to do -- shines light upon a writer we remember, but never really knew. ... Read more


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