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$19.20
21. Plutarch: Moralia, Volume VII,
$36.98
22. Plutarch's Morals: Ethical Essays
$14.38
23. Plutarch's Lives (Volume 2 of
24. Plutarch's Lives, Volume I
$3.63
25. Greek and Roman Lives (Giant Thrifts)
$17.42
26. The children's Plutarch: tales
$16.52
27. Plutarch's life of Lucius Cornelius
28. Plutarch's Lives Volume III.
$19.20
29. Plutarch'sLives, X: Agis and Cleomenes.
30. Lives of the Noble Grecians and
$7.48
31. Plutarch's Lives Volume 1 (Modern
$19.20
32. Plutarch Lives, IX, Demetrius
$33.65
33. Plutarch's Lives: Part 12 Harvard
$22.84
34. Plutarch: Moralia, Volume XIII,
 
$22.41
35. Shakespeare's Plutarch; being
$93.99
36. Plutarch's Lives, Volume II
$14.41
37. The Platonism of Plutarch
 
38. Selected Lives from the Parallel
$26.71
39. Plutarch's Lives for Boys and
$52.90
40. Complete Works of Plutarch - Volume

21. Plutarch: Moralia, Volume VII, On Love of Wealth. On Compliancy. On Envy and Hate. On Praising Oneself Inoffensively. On the Delays of the Divine Vengeance. On Fate... (Loeb Classical Library No. 405)
by Plutarch
Hardcover: 640 Pages (1959-01-01)
list price: US$24.00 -- used & new: US$19.20
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Asin: 0674994469
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Plutarch (Plutarchus), ca. 45–120 CE, was born at Chaeronea in Boeotia in central Greece, studied philosophy at Athens, and, after coming to Rome as a teacher in philosophy, was given consular rank by the emperor Trajan and a procuratorship in Greece by Hadrian. He was married and the father of one daughter and four sons. He appears as a man of kindly character and independent thought, studious and learned.

Plutarch wrote on many subjects. Most popular have always been the 46 Parallel Lives, biographies planned to be ethical examples in pairs (in each pair, one Greek figure and one similar Roman), though the last four lives are single. All are invaluable sources of our knowledge of the lives and characters of Greek and Roman statesmen, soldiers and orators. Plutarch's many other varied extant works, about 60 in number, are known as Moralia or Moral Essays. They are of high literary value, besides being of great use to people interested in philosophy, ethics and religion.

The Loeb Classical Library edition of the Moralia is in fifteen volumes, volume XIII having two parts.

... Read more

Customer Reviews (2)

5-0 out of 5 stars Loeb Classical Library: Plutarch: Moralia V
Came in excellent condition and even faster than I was expecting. Thanks for shipping it so soon after my order!

4-0 out of 5 stars Good source of information on the cults of Isis and Osiris
This volume of Plutarch's Moralia describes the legend and cult of Isis and Osiris, as referred to by my book Vampires or Gods? It is a very interesting look at a major cult during the late imperial period of the Roman Empire. - William Meyers ... Read more


22. Plutarch's Morals: Ethical Essays
by Plutarch Arthur Richard Shilleto
Hardcover: 420 Pages (2008-08-21)
list price: US$36.99 -- used & new: US$36.98
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Asin: 1426472528
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Customer Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars A wonderful translation
I bought this book to learn more about how to deal with hate speech that has been spewed by tea party groups, and others, in addition to hate-speech emails forwarded by some computer users. Actually I got the idea of reading Plutarch from Louis L'Amour's memoirs. Following are just a few of the 26 chapter titles in my paperback edition:

On education
On love to one's offspring
That virtue may be taught
On virtue and vice
On moral virtue
How a man may be benefitted by his enemies
On envy and hatred.

The translation is clear and concise, and I have already learned much about dealing with certain characters in life. As for hate speech, I cannot change people who are willing to forego debate so that they can deceive and try to destroy others, but I can, and do, raise my hands, palm out, and say--words to the effect of--"In me, you have the wrong audience for hate speech." Of course, they deny that they are spewing hate speech. Then I suggest that they start reading Plutarch. This book has been a great benefit for me. ... Read more


23. Plutarch's Lives (Volume 2 of 2)
by Plutarch
Paperback: 512 Pages (2009-01-01)
list price: US$15.99 -- used & new: US$14.38
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Asin: 1420933787
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"Lives" is a series of biographies of famous Greeks and Romans by the ancient Greek historian Plutarch who lived during the first and second century AD. "Lives" consists of twenty-three paired biographies, one Greek and one Roman, and four unpaired, which explore the influence of character on the lives and destinies of the subjects. Rather than providing strictly historical accounts, Plutarch was most concerned with capturing this issue of character. This volume, volume 2 of 2, contains the second half of this classic history in which you will find the biographies of the following persons: Sertorius, Eumenes, Agesilaus, Pompey, Alexander, Cæsar, Phocion, Cato the younger, Agis, Cleomenes, Tiberius Gracchus, Caius Gracchus, Demosthenes, Cicero, Demetrius, Antony, Dion, Marcus Brutus, Aratus, Artaxerxes, Galba, and Otho. ... Read more


24. Plutarch's Lives, Volume I
by Plutarch
Kindle Edition: Pages (2009-10-04)
list price: US$1.99
Asin: B002RKTIV8
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This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery. ... Read more


25. Greek and Roman Lives (Giant Thrifts)
by Plutarch
Paperback: 416 Pages (2005-10-06)
list price: US$6.95 -- used & new: US$3.63
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Asin: 0486445763
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Plutarch's biographies of Solon, Pericles, Alexander the Great, Caesar, Cicero, and others form a brilliant social history of the ancient world. This rich collection reveals the character and personalities of Greece and Rome's most influential figures. It is Plutarch's most enduring work and is an exceptional choice for biography lovers and readers of ancient history.
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Customer Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars The greatest hits of Plutarch
This is an interesting collection of some of Plutarch's "Lives", short biographies of ancient Greek and Roman statesmen and generals. This volume contains the lives of Solon, Themistocles, Pericles, Alcibiades, Alexander the Great, Marius, Sulla, Pompey, Julius Caesar and Cicero.

All are equally interesting, but personally I was most fascinated by the Life of Marius. This Roman general and politician is often depicted as a budding little tyrant who destroyed the Roman republic long before Caesar. To me, he comes across as a strong plebeian leader who strengthened the lower classes of the Roman republic. For tactical reasons, he freed substantial amounts of slaves during his later military campaigns to regain power in Rome. Plutarch even claims that Marius came from a lowly background and that his father was a labourer. Marius' constant and bloody battles with "barbarians" and various Italian city-states are less uplifting, but would sure make for a good Hollywood epic! The biography of Marius' main protagonist, the wily and decadent aristocrat Sulla Felix, is also interesting.

Other high points of this volume are the biographies of two Athenians, the moderate reformer and law giver Solon and the opportunist general Alcibiades. The latter was briefly associated with none other than Socrates.

The main problem with Plutarch is, of course, that you never really know whether he is telling the truth or repeating tall tales. After all, Plutarch lived long after the events he described. Those interested in ancient history would do best to double check all of Plutarch's claims with modern scholarly studies. A problem with this particular edition is the old fashioned translation (from 1864), which may put off some readers. More modern editions of Plutarch exist.

No matter the edition, Plutarchos is indispensable reading for anyone interested in the history of ancient Greece and Rome...
... Read more


26. The children's Plutarch: tales of the Romans
by Frederick James Gould, William Dean Howells, Walter Crane
Paperback: 190 Pages (2010-07-31)
list price: US$23.75 -- used & new: US$17.42
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1176537156
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This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923.This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process.We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book. ... Read more


27. Plutarch's life of Lucius Cornelius Sulla
by Hubert A Holden
Paperback: 366 Pages (2009-11-24)
list price: US$25.99 -- used & new: US$16.52
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Asin: 1117051242
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28. Plutarch's Lives Volume III.
by Plutarch
Kindle Edition: Pages (2009-10-04)
list price: US$1.99
Asin: B002RKTIGI
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This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery. ... Read more


29. Plutarch'sLives, X: Agis and Cleomenes. Tiberius and Gaius Gracchus. Philopoemen and Flamininus (Loeb Classical Library®) (Greek and English Edition)
by Plutarch
Hardcover: 416 Pages (1921-01-01)
list price: US$24.00 -- used & new: US$19.20
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0674991133
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Plutarch (Plutarchus), ca. 45–120 CE, was born at Chaeronea in Boeotia in central Greece, studied philosophy at Athens, and, after coming to Rome as a teacher in philosophy, was given consular rank by the emperor Trajan and a procuratorship in Greece by Hadrian. He was married and the father of one daughter and four sons. He appears as a man of kindly character and independent thought, studious and learned.

Plutarch wrote on many subjects. Most popular have always been the 46 Parallel Lives, biographies planned to be ethical examples in pairs (in each pair, one Greek figure and one similar Roman), though the last four lives are single. All are invaluable sources of our knowledge of the lives and characters of Greek and Roman statesmen, soldiers and orators. Plutarch's many other varied extant works, about 60 in number, are known as Moralia or Moral Essays. They are of high literary value, besides being of great use to people interested in philosophy, ethics and religion.

The Loeb Classical Library edition of the Lives is in eleven volumes.

... Read more

30. Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans, Plutarch's Lives, improved 8/11/2010
by Plutarch
Kindle Edition: Pages (2008-01-06)
list price: US$0.99
Asin: B0012AL3BW
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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The complete multi-volume Lives, in a single file.The Clough translation. On 5/30/2009, I added a table of contents with links to each biography and comparison. If you bought a copy before that date, you should be able to download the new version at no extra cost.According to Wikipedia: "Lucius Mestrius Plutarchus (c. AD 46 - 120 — commonly known in English as Plutarch — was a Roman historian (of Greek ethnicity), biographer, essayist, and Middle Platonist. Plutarch was born to a prominent family in Chaeronea, Boeotia, a town about twenty miles east of Delphi. His known works consist of the Parallel Lives and the Moralia." ... Read more

Customer Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Inside the minds of the greatest heroes of history
Plutarch is unsurpassed at his job.The Lives bring us anicent times, close up.Heroes we remember -- Alexander, for one; and heroes we've forgotten, from Pelopidas and Epaminondas onward.Villains by the score.Glimpses of the impact on our culture of men like Plato are all through this text.Reclaim your intellectual history by reading this book -- not just once, but many times.A lucid translation; source material for the historian. ... Read more


31. Plutarch's Lives Volume 1 (Modern Library Classics)
by Plutarch
Paperback: 816 Pages (2001-04-10)
list price: US$14.95 -- used & new: US$7.48
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Asin: 0375756760
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Plutarch's Lives, written at the beginning of the second century A.D., is a brilliant social history of the ancient world by one of the greatest biographers and moralists of all time. In what is by far his most famous and influential work, Plutarch reveals the character and personality of his subjects and how they led ultimately to tragedy or victory. Richly anecdotal and full of detail, Volume I contains profiles and comparisons of Romulus and Theseus, Numa and Lycurgus, Fabius and Pericles, and many more powerful figures of ancient Greece and Rome.

The present translation, originally published in 1683 in conjunction with a life of Plutarch by John Dryden, was revised in 1864 by the poet and scholar Arthur Hugh Clough, whose notes and preface are also included in this edition.

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Customer Reviews (9)

5-0 out of 5 stars Some suggestions about reading one of the treasures of Western Civilization.
Plutarch's Parallel Lives of the Noble Greek and Romans is one of the central works in the Western literary and philosophical tradition. It is one of the keys to understanding Shakespeare, Machiavelli, Montaigne and Emerson. It was a favorite book and resource of Jefferson, Madison and others of the Founding Fathers. All these writers were deeply influenced by their reading of Plutarch.
Plutarch (hereafter to be P)was a Greek writing in the first century after Christ. He was a Platonist who was also well read in Aristotle as well as a fierce opponent of Stoicism and Epicurius. His paired biographies are based on a broad reading in many sources some of which are lost to us and known only through their presentation in P. P is fan of Thucydides, Homer and Hesiod and Pindar. He had much less use for Herodotus. All of these sources along with many others are woven into his writings. To read P is to be introduced to many of the great writers and thinkers of the Greeks and the Romans. For me, it has been a delight. When reading the first volume of the Modern Library edition of Plutarch, I have found myself wondering why I put off reading him for so long. He is a subtle and entertaining companion.

For my review, I want to do two things. First, I want to offer you reasons to read the Modern Library edition of Plutarch over the alternative such as the Loeb edition or the Penguin Travesty.
The reasons for my preference for the Modern Library edition is two-fold. It is true to P's intention and it is cheap.
The Penguins are (or should be considered)a joke. That publisher decided to offer Plutarch by splitting up the pair biographies and then presenting all the biographies that had to do with, say, the Makers of Rome. Never mind that Plutarch denied that he was writing history as such. Never mind that he organized his writing around the paired biographies and that he had several purposes in doing so. The Penguin Powers That Be know better than P! Plutarch's writings should be offered to us in easy-to-digest (i.e., fairly short) books about something like the Rise of Romerather than a very long book about the dynamic interactions between character, virtue, upbringing, fate (or Fortune or God, your pick) of the individual in interaction with that of their polis. Nobody, fears the Lord Editors of Penguinia, would want to read a complicated book like that. Needless to say, I think the Penguin editors are a bunch of maroons (although they do some things right like including a few maps to help us figure out where they heck Illyria, Thrace or Parthia were).
The Loeb edition runs to eleven volumes, each of which includes the Greek and each of which is expensive. From what I have seen of the Loeb, I don't think the notes are enough of an argument to favor this edition.
So buy the Modern Library edition. It gives you all of the biographies, in their original pairings and all the extant individual ones including a couple (of Galba and Otho) of biographies that are all that is left of a series on Roman emperors. The Dryden translation is a good one or so I believe simply because the voice of the author is distinctive, consistent and enjoyable. Reading this edition, I can understand why so many people have enjoyed P. for so long.

The most important point I want to make is that I believe that Plutarch had several intentions behind his organization. He is writing toward the end of the 1rst century AD- a period of Roman domination over just about everybody (that Plutarch knew of). I said earlier that I found P to be a subtle writer. For an instance, look to the Comparison that he makes after writing about Lycurgus and Numa. Toward the end, P basically asks if Rome is the better for the six centuries or so of constant warfare that she unleashed upon Italy and the world after the death of Numa. He doesn't give an answer although he suggests what his would be by talking about how the answer would differ from judges who value "riches, luxury, and dominion rather than in security, gentleness, and the independence which is accompanied by justice" (p. 106 of the Modern Library edition). In my reading, in other words, Plutarch is pushing for Greek culture to establish a counterweight or a critique to Roman hegemony. Rome may be militarily supreme but that is a mere moment in Fortune's turning wheel. And culturally, Rome is subject to the standards established by the Greeks like Plato, Aeschylus, Homer and Thucydides.
Even more central to P.'s thinking are moral lessons to be learned from comparing great men whose characteristics in interaction with their upbringing created men of often conflicting virtues who then tried to use the circumstances of their times to achieve glory for themselves and their cities.
This is an enormous theme with infinite variations. P.'s weaves in through these studies thoughts on political philosophy, on the reliability of founding myths, on the struggle between the many and the few (class struggle, we like to call it)and other assorted themes. It is a glorious and messy brew.

One final remark- I have yet to locate anything that presents itself as a companion to this book. I find that lack staggering. Why isn't there a commentary of the book as a whole which provides background history, prosography, maps, etc.? Wikipedia and the Oxford Classical Dictionary have been my constant companions as I have read P. As inordinate as my ignorance is, I cannot be the only reader of Plutarch that has decried that lack of a decent companion volume.
I am currently reading Plutarch by Robert Lamberton and plan to read a few other secondary sources before I go on to volume 2. I will review them as I finish them especially if I find a stand alone sourcebook for the background knowledge necessary for a decent reading of Plutarch. In the meantime, I can only encourage you to pick up a copy. If you are not as impressed as I am, so be it. But you may find yourself as carried away as I have been. In that case, you will be singing my praises as well as Plutarch's.
Addendum: Scholarly obsession compels me to reveal a flaw in the Modern Library edition that I have only become aware of since finishing the first volume. I am currently reading Robert Lamberton's book on Plutarch. He, like all scholars of the work, refer to the Lives by the life in question and section numbers. For example, he will refer to Lyc., 2 to indicate the second section of the life of Lycurgus. Unfortunately, the Modern Library edition does not include the traditional section numbers so all references are much more difficult to chase down. And there are typically 30+ sections for each life. If that sort of thing is important to you, this lack may effect that choice of which edition of the Lives you choose.

4-0 out of 5 stars great collection of lives
This is a great collection of ancient biographies, written by Plutarch, who was really artist in the field of the literature. Even more than five stars for this masterpiece.

The old English translation of the original Greek text made by Dryden can make some minor problems while reading the text.

This edition of Plutarch's lives should be published in hardcover. Paperback edition made to give only four stars for this product.

5-0 out of 5 stars history
I am a great fan of ancient history studies, and found this presentation of a classic to be quite satisfying. In addition, as expected, the purchase price, ease of ordering, speed of delivery, and integrity of product, were on the usual, excellent level.

4-0 out of 5 stars Dryden, Clough and Others
First off, let me clarify that what follows is a review of a particular edition of Plutarch's Lives, the current (2001) edition from Modern Library Classics.It is not a review of the book itself and will not provide any information on the relevance of this wonderful classic or the many lives it includes or the ingenious structure of paralleling the lives of Greeks and Romans or the importance of this text to the history of biography.Several other reviews here do a fine job of that and I see no reason to cover the same ground.Moreover, I've noted rather a lot of confusion about this edition in reviews here on Amazon (see particularly the reviews associated with the hardbound Modern Library volumes).I am still researching the Dryden edition, but thought I might offer a few comments to provide clarity and a better understanding of this edition for those whose buying decisions are based on the nature and quality of a particular translation.

"The Dryden Translation" - this unusual phrasing (which appears on the cover) has become the traditional descriptor for this version of the Lives.In fact, Dryden is not, properly speaking, the translator of this book.In one article in Wikipedia he is described as an overseer for the edition and in another as editor-in-chief, but he is also described as having simply "lent" his name to the enterprise.I am still researching this, but I should not be surprised if Jacob Tonson, the publisher, was not more involved in editing than was Dryden.[Update: My research to date has been inconclusive on the full nature of Dryden's role in this undertaking, but none of the more detailed resources I have turned to suggest that Dryden actually participated in this book as a "translator."Very possibly, this is one of those many little facts of history that have gone unrecorded and for which we shall have to content ourselves with the conjecture of scholarly experts.What is most surprising, however, is how often Dryden is given as the translator of this volume in various less detailed references to the book.Encyclopedia Britannica, for example, has Dryden as the translator; Wikipedia, much to my surprise, does not -- what can I say? sometimes the amateurs outdo the professionals.]

Dryden's primary involvement in the project seems to have been his "Life of Plutarch" which is included in this edition only by way of a two short excerpts in Clough's Preface.

Arthur Hugh Clough's Preface and Revisions - Clough was a nineteenth century poet.Clough's preface was, for me, a major reason I became interested in the Modern Library edition.I found the preface quite intriguing.It is a solid piece of work from an individual who was neither a full time scholar, nor a particularly notable prose writer.In a couple of cases, the argument at the very beginning of the preface for example, he seems to drop his thoughts without fully completing them.But this is a minor problem in an otherwise well thought out and informative discussion of Plutarch and his book.

The text itself - One of the reviewers here on Amazon calls this Clough's "train wreck" assuming that the difficulties in the text must lie with Clough because, concludes the reviewer, Dryden is a much better prose writer.Few would doubt that Dryden was a better prose writer, but I strongly suspect that the translation in this case (not Dryden's as I have already pointed out) was aided by Clough's hand.I am having trouble getting a copy of the original (pre-Clough) "Dryden" translation, although I should very much like to do a comparison.Once Clough's version came out, publishers seem to have had no reason to go back to the original which provides at least some indication that Clough had resolved some of the problems with the text.As a result, the pure "Dryden" editions are older and more expensive.

I find the text quite readable.It is not a "modern" translation (I hate using the word "modern" here because I think of Clough as a modern, perhaps I should say it is not a twentieth or twenty-first century translation).This text is clearly more given to complex clausal structures than we would expect in a popular translation today.I think it more than has its merits.I'm not sure but that the complex clausal structures might not have their own virtue in a text like this.Certainly one of the interesting qualities in Plutarch is a kind of questioning of sources that the syntax of this edition brings out rather nicely.I say that, however, as a non-classicist with little or no Greek, so I cannot be sure whether it really does reflect the original.

Notes - My chief concern with the text would be that it lacks annotation or other textual apparatus beyond an index.This is particularly peculiar given that the cover states that it includes notes by Clough!I am trying to get my hands on an earlier edition of the Clough revision to see what it might contain in the way of notes.Nonetheless, I'm not quite sure what to make of the Modern Library advertising notes on the cover, but providing none.Until I know better what these notes might entail, I'm loath to make any judgment.[Update: I attempted to contact Random House about my concerns but, to my surprise, I could not get them to understand that I was not referring to the notes in the preface, but rather to notes for the text itself!I hate to be too hard on Random House over something like this, notheless, I still feel I should provide some warning to potential buyers.The language on the cover suggests that this book includes Clough's notes.It does not.I have, since I first wrote this, purchased a copy of an early edition with the Clough edits.In all honesty Clough's notes are few and far between, but there is enough of value in them that, in my opinion, at least, they should have been included.And, not to be too snarky, but Clough and Random House deserve editors who understand the difference between textual notes and notes to a preface.]

Introduction by James Atlas - I wish I could speak more highly of the Modern Library introduction, but I am afraid I felt it was lacking on many levels.It fails in anyway to clarify the nature of the translation.One would think that it would at least contain some mention of the relevance of this particular text (why reprint it now?), of the curious assignment of Dryden's name as translator to a book that he did not translate, and of the role that Clough played as a nineteenth century editor of a seventeenth century text.

Additionally, and perhaps most warranting concern, Atlas's introduction covers such similar ground to Clough's Preface (even using many of the same quotations) that it feels rather curiously redundant.

The cover - I cannot close without commenting on the cover.It looks like wallpaper for a nineteenth century classicist's study.And quite honestly, I like it.

I've given the book four stars because I see no reason to visit the sins of this particular edition upon the text as a whole, and the text has plenty of merits both as a translation and as a classic of literature.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Timeless Classic By One Of The Best Biographers In History
Plutarch in his "Lives Of The Noble Grecians And Romans" written around 100 C.E., sheds new light on Greek and Roman history from their Bronze Age beginnings, shrouded in myth, down through Alexander and late Republican Rome.Plutarch is the lens that we use today to view the Greco-Roman past; his work has shaped our perceptions of that world for 2,000 years.Plutarch writes of the rise of Roman Empire while Gibbon uses his scholarship to advance the story to write about its decline.He was a proud Greek that was equally effected by Roman culture, a Delphic priest, a leading Platonist, a moralist, educator and philosopher with a deep commitment as a first rate writer.Being a Roman citizen, Plutarch was afforded the opportunity to become an intimate friend to prominent Roman citizens and a member of the literary elite in the court of Emperor Trajan.

Plutarch's influence and enormous popularity during and after the Renaissance is legendary among classicist. Plutarch's "Lives", served as the sourcebook for Shakespeare's Roman Plays "Julius Caesar", "Antony and Cleopatra" and "Coriolanus".By the way Plutarch is even the only contemporary source of all the biographical information on Cleopatra, whom he writes about in his biographies of Julius Caesar, Mark Antony and Octavian. Thomas Jefferson wrote to his nephew that there were three books every gentleman had to have familiarity with; Plutarch's "Lives", Livy's "History of Rome" and Virgil's Aeneid.In fact all the founding fathers of note had read Plutarch and learned much from his fifty biographies of noble men of Greece and Rome.When Hamilton, Jay and Madison write "The Federalist Papers" they use many examples of good and bad leadership traits that they read in Plutarch's work.His biographies are a great study in human character and what motivates leaders to decide and act the way they do, this masterpiece has proven to be still prescient today.

If you are truly interested in a classical education, put this book on the top of your list! I recommend this book to anyone who is interested in political philosophy, and history.
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32. Plutarch Lives, IX, Demetrius and Antony. Pyrrhus and Gaius Marius (Loeb Classical Library)
by Plutarch
Hardcover: 640 Pages (1920-01-01)
list price: US$24.00 -- used & new: US$19.20
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0674991125
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
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Plutarch (Plutarchus), ca. 45–120 CE, was born at Chaeronea in Boeotia in central Greece, studied philosophy at Athens, and, after coming to Rome as a teacher in philosophy, was given consular rank by the emperor Trajan and a procuratorship in Greece by Hadrian. He was married and the father of one daughter and four sons. He appears as a man of kindly character and independent thought, studious and learned.

Plutarch wrote on many subjects. Most popular have always been the 46 Parallel Lives, biographies planned to be ethical examples in pairs (in each pair, one Greek figure and one similar Roman), though the last four lives are single. All are invaluable sources of our knowledge of the lives and characters of Greek and Roman statesmen, soldiers and orators. Plutarch's many other varied extant works, about 60 in number, are known as Moralia or Moral Essays. They are of high literary value, besides being of great use to people interested in philosophy, ethics and religion.

The Loeb Classical Library edition of the Lives is in eleven volumes.

... Read more

Customer Reviews (2)

5-0 out of 5 stars A Timeless Classic By One Of The Best Biographers In History
Plutarch in his "Lives Of The Noble Grecians And Romans" written around 100 C.E., sheds new light on Greek and Roman history from their Bronze Age beginnings, shrouded in myth, down through Alexander and late Republican Rome.Plutarch is the lens that we use today to view the Greco-Roman past; his work has shaped our perceptions of that world for 2,000 years.Plutarch writes of the rise of Roman Empire while Gibbon uses his scholarship to advance the story to write about its decline.He was a proud Greek that was equally effected by Roman culture, a Delphic priest, a leading Platonist, a moralist, educator and philosopher with a deep commitment as a first rate writer.Being a Roman citizen, Plutarch was afforded the opportunity to become an intimate friend to prominent Roman citizens and a member of the literary elite in the court of Emperor Trajan.

Plutarch's influence and enormous popularity during and after the Renaissance is legendary among classicist. Plutarch's "Lives", served as the sourcebook for Shakespeare's Roman Plays "Julius Caesar", "Antony and Cleopatra" and "Coriolanus".By the way Plutarch is even the only contemporary source of all the biographical information on Cleopatra, whom he writes about in his biographies of Julius Caesar, Mark Antony and Octavian. Thomas Jefferson wrote to his nephew that there were three books every gentleman had to have familiarity with; Plutarch's "Lives", Livy's "History of Rome" and Virgil's Aeneid.In fact all the founding fathers of note had read Plutarch and learned much from his fifty biographies of noble men of Greece and Rome.When Hamilton, Jay and Madison write "The Federalist Papers" they use many examples of good and bad leadership traits that they read in Plutarch's work.His biographies are a great study in human character and what motivates leaders to decide and act the way they do, this masterpiece has proven to be still prescient today.

If you are truly interested in a classical education, put this book on the top of your list! I recommend this book to anyone who is interested in political philosophy, and history.

5-0 out of 5 stars Collection of Plutarch's Lives
This book is one of an 11 volume collection of PLutarch's Lives. In the Parallel Lives Plutarch writes about influential men of the ancient world and compares and contrasts them. Some include Theseus and Remulus, Periclesand Fabius Maximus, and Themistocles and Camillus. The books are veryintriguing and each pair of lives is about 110 pages, double that number ifthe original Greek writing is counted which appears on the the reverse sideof the pages. So if you want to learn Greek, this is one way to learn! ... Read more


33. Plutarch's Lives: Part 12 Harvard Classics
by Plutarch
Hardcover: 412 Pages (2004-01-11)
list price: US$49.95 -- used & new: US$33.65
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Asin: 1432618385
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Plutarch's Lives of Themistocles; Pericles; Aristides; Alcibiades and Coriolanus; Comparison of Alcibiades with Coriolanus; Demosthenes; and Cicero; Comparison of Demosthenes and Cicero; Caesar and Antony. In the translation called Dryden's corrected and revised by Arthur Hugh Clough with introductions and notes. ... Read more


34. Plutarch: Moralia, Volume XIII, Part 2. Stoic Essays (Loeb Classical Library No. 470)
by Plutarch
Hardcover: 544 Pages (1976-01-01)
list price: US$24.00 -- used & new: US$22.84
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Asin: 0674995171
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Plutarch (Plutarchus), ca. 45–120 CE, was born at Chaeronea in Boeotia in central Greece, studied philosophy at Athens, and, after coming to Rome as a teacher in philosophy, was given consular rank by the emperor Trajan and a procuratorship in Greece by Hadrian. He was married and the father of one daughter and four sons. He appears as a man of kindly character and independent thought, studious and learned.

Plutarch wrote on many subjects. Most popular have always been the 46 Parallel Lives, biographies planned to be ethical examples in pairs (in each pair, one Greek figure and one similar Roman), though the last four lives are single. All are invaluable sources of our knowledge of the lives and characters of Greek and Roman statesmen, soldiers and orators. Plutarch's many other varied extant works, about 60 in number, are known as Moralia or Moral Essays. They are of high literary value, besides being of great use to people interested in philosophy, ethics and religion.

The Loeb Classical Library edition of the Moralia is in fifteen volumes, volume XIII having two parts.

... Read more

Customer Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars A Timeless Classic By One Of The Best Biographers In History
Plutarch in his "Lives Of The Noble Grecians And Romans" written around 100 C.E., sheds new light on Greek and Roman history from their Bronze Age beginnings, shrouded in myth, down through Alexander and late Republican Rome.Plutarch is the lens that we use today to view the Greco-Roman past; his work has shaped our perceptions of that world for 2,000 years.Plutarch writes of the rise of Roman Empire while Gibbon uses his scholarship to advance the story to write about its decline.He was a proud Greek that was equally effected by Roman culture, a Delphic priest, a leading Platonist, a moralist, educator and philosopher with a deep commitment as a first rate writer.Being a Roman citizen, Plutarch was afforded the opportunity to become an intimate friend to prominent Roman citizens and a member of the literary elite in the court of Emperor Trajan.

Plutarch's influence and enormous popularity during and after the Renaissance is legendary among classicist. Plutarch's "Lives", served as the sourcebook for Shakespeare's Roman Plays "Julius Caesar", "Antony and Cleopatra" and "Coriolanus".By the way Plutarch is even the only contemporary source of all the biographical information on Cleopatra, whom he writes about in his biographies of Julius Caesar, Mark Antony and Octavian. Thomas Jefferson wrote to his nephew that there were three books every gentleman had to have familiarity with; Plutarch's "Lives", Livy's "History of Rome" and Virgil's Aeneid.In fact all the founding fathers of note had read Plutarch and learned much from his fifty biographies of noble men of Greece and Rome.When Hamilton, Jay and Madison write "The Federalist Papers" they use many examples of good and bad leadership traits that they read in Plutarch's work.His biographies are a great study in human character and what motivates leaders to decide and act the way they do, this masterpiece has proven to be still prescient today.

If you are truly interested in a classical education, put this book on the top of your list! I recommend this book to anyone who is interested in political philosophy, and history.
... Read more


35. Shakespeare's Plutarch; being a selection from the lives in North's Plutarch which illustrate Shakespeare's plays
by Plutarch Plutarch, Thomas North, Walter W. 1835-1912 Skeat
 Paperback: 362 Pages (2010-09-09)
list price: US$32.75 -- used & new: US$22.41
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1171852738
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This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923.This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process.We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book. ... Read more


36. Plutarch's Lives, Volume II
Paperback: 408 Pages (2009-01-12)
list price: US$93.99 -- used & new: US$93.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1437879519
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Quality Classics

We specialize in creating hard to find, high quality classic books optimized for the Kindle.

We always have the highest quality books. Sick of spelling errors, weird characters, or a lack of pictures in illustrated books? Well we know how you feel. All of our books are formatted and reviewed by an actual human for the Kindle, and always 99 cents.

To find more of our books search "Quality Classics" in Amazon. ... Read more


37. The Platonism of Plutarch
by Roger Miller Jones
Paperback: 156 Pages (2009-03-09)
list price: US$21.99 -- used & new: US$14.41
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1103527843
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This scarce antiquarian book is a selection from Kessinger Publishings Legacy Reprint Series. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment to protecting, preserving, and promoting the worlds literature. Kessinger Publishing is the place to find hundreds of thousands of rare and hard-to-find books with something of interest for everyone! ... Read more


38. Selected Lives from the Parallel Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans
by Plutarch
 Hardcover: Pages

Asin: B001DXJNS8
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Customer Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars A Timeless Classic By One Of The Best Biographers In History
Plutarch in his "Lives Of The Noble Grecians And Romans" written around 100 C.E., sheds new light on Greek and Roman history from their Bronze Age beginnings, shrouded in myth, down through Alexander and late Republican Rome.Plutarch is the lens that we use today to view the Greco-Roman past; his work has shaped our perceptions of that world for 2,000 years.Plutarch writes of the rise of Roman Empire while Gibbon uses his scholarship to advance the story to write about its decline.He was a proud Greek that was equally effected by Roman culture, a Delphic priest, a leading Platonist, a moralist, educator and philosopher with a deep commitment as a first rate writer.Being a Roman citizen, Plutarch was afforded the opportunity to become an intimate friend to prominent Roman citizens and a member of the literary elite in the court of Emperor Trajan.

Plutarch's influence and enormous popularity during and after the Renaissance is legendary among classicist. Plutarch's "Lives", served as the sourcebook for Shakespeare's Roman Plays "Julius Caesar", "Antony and Cleopatra" and "Coriolanus".By the way Plutarch is even the only contemporary source of all the biographical information on Cleopatra, whom he writes about in his biographies of Julius Caesar, Mark Antony and Octavian. Thomas Jefferson wrote to his nephew that there were three books every gentleman had to have familiarity with; Plutarch's "Lives", Livy's "History of Rome" and Virgil's Aeneid.In fact all the founding fathers of note had read Plutarch and learned much from his fifty biographies of noble men of Greece and Rome.When Hamilton, Jay and Madison write "The Federalist Papers" they use many examples of good and bad leadership traits that they read in Plutarch's work.His biographies are a great study in human character and what motivates leaders to decide and act the way they do, this masterpiece has proven to be still prescient today.

If you are truly interested in a classical education, put this book on the top of your list! I recommend this book to anyone who is interested in political philosophy, and history.
... Read more


39. Plutarch's Lives for Boys and Girls
by W H Weston
Paperback: 182 Pages (2010-01-01)
list price: US$26.71 -- used & new: US$26.71
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 115178656X
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Publisher: New York : StokesPublication date: 1900Subjects: Biography -- To 500Rome -- BiographyGreece -- BiographyNotes: This is an OCR reprint. There may be typos or missing text. There are no illustrations or indexes.When you buy the General Books edition of this book you get free trial access to Million-Books.com where you can select from more than a million books for free. You can also preview the book there. ... Read more


40. Complete Works of Plutarch - Volume 3; Essays and Miscellanies
by Plutarch
Paperback: 464 Pages (2010-03-06)
list price: US$52.90 -- used & new: US$52.90
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Asin: 1153596806
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The book has no illustrations or index. Purchasers are entitled to a free trial membership in the General Books Club where they can select from more than a million books without charge. Subjects: Greek essays; Literature; Philosophy; Ethics; Literary Collections / Essays; Literary Collections / General; History / General; Humor / Form / Essays; Literary Collections / General; Philosophy / Ethics ... Read more


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