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$17.00
1. The Lysander Spooner Reader
$37.12
2. Lysander Spooner: American Anarchist
$6.94
3. No Treason The Constitution of
$24.00
4. Let's Abolish Government
 
5. Collected Works of Lysander Spooner
6. The Constitution of No Authority
7. The Spooner Collection: An Essay
$22.43
8. Vices Are Not Crimes: A Vindication
$16.99
9. Poverty: its illegal causes and
10. NO TREASON - The Constitution
 
11.
 
12.
 
13.
$17.57
14. The unconstitutionality of slavery:
$28.94
15. An Essay On The Trial By Jury
 
16. Instead of A Magazine. An organ
$12.00
17. Review of Lysander Spooner's essay
$12.72
18. Review of Lysander Spooner's essay
 
19. Natural law, or the science of
$11.12
20. A defense for fugitive slaves,

1. The Lysander Spooner Reader
by George H. Smith
Paperback: 343 Pages (1992-05-01)
list price: US$14.95 -- used & new: US$17.00
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Asin: 0930073266
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Lawyer, abolitionist, radical; Spooner was one of the mostfascinating figures in American history and a champion ofindividualism. This selection includes "Vices Are Not Crimes,""Natural Law," "Trial by Jury," "No Treason, the Constitution ofNo Authority," "Letter to Thomas Bayard," and Benjamin Tucker'seulogy. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (7)

5-0 out of 5 stars A MUST-READ for anyone who values TRUE liberty!
Few describe it or understand it (liberty and the lie that is government) better than Lysander.

5-0 out of 5 stars Absolutely Concept-Shattering
It is a wonder that this man is not more commonly mentioned or taught in schools. I found out about him at a conference I was attending the summer after my 12th grade year (5 years ago now) hosted by none other than Tom G Palmer, whose review can be read above...

...And I must say that few times have I read words that so accurately reflect a feeling that I already had intrinsically -- "Constitution of No Authority" speaks to the illusory nature of government in a way that very few tracts have been bold enough to probe since.

Whether you're a leftist, libertarian, or a conservative, this deserves a thorough look.

5-0 out of 5 stars Brilliantly refutes "social contract" argument.
The previous reviewer claims Spooner's argument against the authority of the Constitution is invalid, since contract law is only possible in the context of a government.However, the reviewer has it reversed:though a valid contract may be *enforced* by a government, the government's authority must be *justified* in the first place.A contract's validity comes not from government, but rather from Lockean natural law.

Statists attempt to justify government sovereignty via social contract theory, which states that taxation andgovernment authority can be justified according to a supposed "contract" among the citizens, as manifested by the Constitution.In _No Treason_, Spooner brilliantly and forcefully demolishes this argument by demonstrating this "contract" is not valid in any meaningful sense, according to "principles of law and reason."

As other reviewers have stated, Lysander Spooner's essays will make you never look at the legitimacy of the government, voting, and taxes the same way again, even if you don't agree with his arguments.


3-0 out of 5 stars It's hard not to like this guy...but....
Lysander Spooner, the fiery american anarchst, offers a great counterpoint to the collectivist anarchist of the same era, Emma Goldman. Like Goldman, Spooner's rhetoric is explosive, lively and (very unlike Goldman) right on the money. Well, at least most of the time.

This is a very good collection featuring Natural Law, Vices Are Not Crimes, No Treason, Letter to Thomas F. Bayard, and Trial by Jury. Of course, the last article takes up a good portion of the book. In addition, we are treated to an obituary written by an equally fiery anarchist, Ben Tucker.

So why the 3 stars? Well, as much fire as Spooner has, therer are many holes in his arguments. Much of No Treason, for instance, is spent on the constitution as violation of contract law, but Spooner doesn't seem to realize (or maybe assumes it as natural law) that contract law doesn't exist without government. You pick one or the other...not both! In Natural Law, we find Spooner repeating himself in each paragraph, appealing to what at best can be described as overarching faith; at worst, a chimera. And this is what Spooners anarcho-individualism is supposed to be based on?

It must be said that No Treason's part iv and Letter to Thomas Bayard are astute in Spooners criticism of government as thievery and it would be hard to argue with the arguments in Vices are Not Crimes. Trial by Jury is interesting but dissapointing especially when we realize that Spooner, who often criticizes government for being inconsistent and, indeed, arbitrary, couldn't be much happier if the 12 individuals could mend any law at will post facto. I'm just not convinced that Spooner thought it through.

For all of that, if you are interested in anarchism (respectable anarchism, not Kropotkin and Goldman) then Spooner is one of the only games in town. For a different (and less reverent) take on anarcho-individualism, I'd suggest reading Max Stirner's The Ego and His Own.

5-0 out of 5 stars Civics 101
It just so happens that the day I write this review is not only Constitution Day (the anniversary of the US Constitution being sent to the states for ratification), but also primary election day here in Seattle. That means there's no better day to re-read the works of Lysander Spooner -- a writer who, perhaps more than any other, can single-handedly change the way you look at both the Constitution and voting.This collection is the place to do that, including as it does nearly all of Spooner's most important work: "No Treason" (with "The Constitution of No Authority"), "Vices are not Crimes," "Trial by Jury," and his "Letter to Thomas F. Bayard."

Lysander Spooner was a fascinating man in his own right, as both the Introduction by editor George Smith and the first chapter, "Our Nestor Taken From Us," an obituary by Benjamin Tucker, make clear. Individualist anarchist, abolitionist, scholar, pamphleteer, radical -- it's a shame this Forgotten Hero is so obscure today. But given the skill and passion with which he slaughtered, barbecued, and served up America's most sacred cows, it's hardly surprising.It's a rare, almost forbidden, treat to find an original thinker any more. As Smith notes in his introduction, it's easy to envy someone reading Spooner for the first time the thought-provoking challenge she's about to experience.

Doctrinaires of the left and the right will be horrified by what they read between these pages. And those who still parrot the Received Wisdom of their junior-high "social studies" teachers (it's your duty to vote ... if you don't vote, you can't complain ... in a democracy, the people govern themselves ... "taxes are the price we pay for a civilized society" ... ad infinitum, ad nauseam) will find themselves forced to defend many of their most cherished illusions. To quote Smith again, the ideas are both commonsensical, and very recognizably American. Anyone who gives them the respect they deserve -- thinking about them instead of ignoring them -- will find their view of politics and law fundamentally altered.

America would be a very different place if more people burned with Spooner's passionate love of liberty and justice. Of course, that's why you'll never see Lysander Spooner on a public school civics reading list. But don't let that stop you. Are you up to the challenge? ... Read more


2. Lysander Spooner: American Anarchist
by Steve J. Shone
Hardcover: 138 Pages (2010-06-16)
list price: US$55.00 -- used & new: US$37.12
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Asin: 0739144502
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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Lysander Spooner: American Anarchist is the first book-length exposition of the ideas of the American anarchist and abolitionist who lived mostly in Boston, Massachusetts, from 1808 to 1887. Few people today are familiar with Spooner. Nonetheless, there are many interesting strands of original thought to be found in his works that have contemporary significance_for example his reflections on the need for jury nullification or his devastating critique of the social contract. Rediscovering Spooner today is no mere investigation of a bygone nineteenth century thinker, but rather a gateway to a brilliant and original scholar whose counsel should not be ignored. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (1)

4-0 out of 5 stars Very good source of information
There's a lot about this man that had previously escaped my attention... this book rectifies that situation, and does it pretty well! ... Read more


3. No Treason The Constitution of No Authority
by Lysander Spooner
Paperback: 54 Pages (2010-08-12)
list price: US$6.95 -- used & new: US$6.94
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Asin: 189139620X
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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2010 Reprint of the original 1870 edition. Paperback 55pp. Lysander Spooner (January 19, 1808 - May 14, 1887) was an American anarchist, entrepreneur, political philosopher, abolitionist, supporter of the labor movement, and legal theorist of the nineteenth century. He is also known for competing with the U.S. Post Office with his American Letter Mail Company, which was forced out of business by the United States government. He has been identified by some contemporary writers as an anarcho-capitalist, while other writers and activists are convinced by his advocacy of self-employment over working for an employer for wages, that he was an anti-capitalist or a socialist, notwithstanding his support for private ownership of the means of production and a free-market economy. No Treason has it origins in The Union government's actions during the Civil War. In response, Spooner published one of his most famous political tracts, No Treason. In this lengthy essay, Spooner argued that the Constitution was a contract of government which had been irreparably violated during the war and was thus void. Furthermore, since the government now existing under the Constitution pursued coercive policies that were contrary to the Natural Law and to the consent of the governed, it had been demonstrated that document was unable to adequately stop many abuses against liberty or to prevent tyranny from taking hold. Spooner bolstered his argument by noting that the Federal government, as established by a legal contract, could not legally bind all persons living in the nation since none had ever signed their names or given their consent to it - that consent had always been assumed, which fails the most basic burdens of proof for a valid contract in the courtroom. Spooner widely circulated the No Treason pamphlets, which also contained a legal defense against the crime of treason itself intended for former Confederate soldiers (hence the name of the pamphlet, arguing that "no treason" had been committed in the war by the south). These excerpts were published in DeBow's Review and some other well known southern periodicals of the time. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (7)

1-0 out of 5 stars Angels dancing on the head of a pin?
This "apparently" profound logic, while logical, is anything but profound! The case is built on the premise, "If they had intended to bind their posterity to live under it, they should have said that their object was, not 'to secure to them the blessings of liberty,' but to make slaves of them; for if their 'posterity' are bound to live under it, they are nothing less than the slaves of their foolish, tyrannical, and dead grandfathers." This simplistic statement is profound/relevant only if you accept the conclusion that a statement of governing principles or ideals "enslaves" those that follow it. It betrays its weakness by characterizing those who suggest such principles as "foolish, tyrannical, and dead," as though any of those characteristics were necessarily true or relevant. The bottom line is, Mr. Spooner completely misunderstands the concept of a "social contract" and its relationship to any constitution. A constitution is simply a written statement of governing principles which, under the theory of social contract, may be modified or abandoned at any time if they are found to be contra to our inalienable rights. The fact that our constitution prescribes procedures for modification or abolition does not bind anyone to those procedures--it doesn't enslave them--because each individual and generation voluntarily submits to their logic or doesn't. If you accept his premise, NO constitution is possible, since all constitutions are condemned as "enslaving."

5-0 out of 5 stars ..."on principles of law and reason"
In No Treason, Lysander Spooner uses the above expression on practically every page. On those foundations, he makes his case that the US Constitution--and by universal extension, any other formal written document that aims to set up a compulsory central government--cannot be morally or legally justified. Primarily Spooner focuses on the weaknesses of the "social contract" argument. He puts the Constitution to the test of contracts, as prevailed in his time and place, and concludes that it does not meet the basic criteria for a contract at all... hence is not valid or binding on anyone.

No Treason is a great book to reread, because over time one tends to forget the incisive quality of the anarchist case...

...

For my complete review of this book and for other book and movie
reviews, please visit my site [...]

Brian Wright
Copyright 2009

5-0 out of 5 stars Well written, concise, relevant
Looking at the range of literature on drug prohibition, Spooner cuts the fluff for a more exact rational.

5-0 out of 5 stars An Essay That Causes Readers to Think about the U.S. Constitution, the Common Law, and Natural Law
Lysander Spooner's trenchent essay titled NO TREASON: THE CONSTITUTION OF NO AUTHORITY is reason to think about constitutional rights, authority, the legal system vs. natural law, etc. Spooner who was a learned jurist, abolitionist, business man, and "gadfly" to the powers that be before and after this and other essays were written. His comments on the relationship between poltical leaders and the hidden actual "powers behind the throne" are serious comments that thoughtful Americans should carefully consider.

Spooner thought that the Constitution had no binding authority based on the laws of contract, association, and due process. Spooner stated that those who ratified the Constitution had no authority to bind posterity to the document since these men could not get suceeding generations to sign or agree to a contract. Spooner argued that these men expressed a hope and a sentiment rather than any iron-clad contract. Spooner stated that in a legal case of contract, a plantiff could not enforce a judgement against a civil defendant if the defendant's name was not signed to a contract. The U.S. Constitution which was ratified in 1787 could not possibly be contractually binding on future generations. Spooner also used the example of a corporations whose members signed contracts to create these institutions. However, once the original individuals died, the corporation died with them them unless successors agreed to continue the corportation by SIGNED written contract.

Spooner also makes a good case of any political document actually representing the "people." Estimates are that during the first three-quaters of the 19th. century, between one-tenth and one-twentieth of the U.S. population were elgible to vote, and yet even fewer of elgible voters actually voted. Spooner was clear that this is not representing "the people." Spooner was aware that voting was supposed to select the best men for government posts. Yet, voting was too often a self defense motive against those who may vote against one's interests.

Spooner further stated that Article I Paragraph 6 protected U.S. Representatives and Senators from arrest except except for treason, felony,etc. Yet, U.S. Senators and Representatives could meet in secret sessions, "behind closed doors," and in seclusion to make poltical deals that could make any ordinary citizen subject to arrest and trial for criminal conspiracy. Yet, the privledged members of the U.S. Congress were made immune to such legal sanctions. The same could be said for members of state legislatures. Who is the judge of unjust legislation and congressional action? Spooner is clear that appointed federal judges are the final arbiters who rarely overturn such unjust laws. Members of the U.S. Congress are seldom held accountable, and the impeachment and removal from office procedures are so awkwardand slow as to be of little or no avial.

Spooner also makes the connection between wealthy interests and the government (any government). Governments borrow huge sums from these interests at extremly high interest rates and use armed force to pay for these loans via taxes. Yet, the lenders sometimes bet on a losing cause. One footnote reminds readers that the French banking house of Erlanger loaned huge sums to the Confederacy who lost the U.S. Civil War. Another example mentioned were the loans made by the Rothchilds to the Hapsburgs in 1866, and the Hapsburgs lost a war with the Prussians so quickly that the war is known as The Seven Weeks War.

There is an interesting comment in this collection of essays that Spooner started a private mail company called the Amercian Letter Mail Company in 1845 which competed successfully with the U.S. Postal Service until The American Mail Letter Company was voted out of existence. There is an interesting comment that Spooner's short-lived business was successful. Stamp collectors do not consider the stamps very valuable because so many are available which implies a good business volume.

Spooner's legal and political thinking are not outdated when one considers the concentrations of power in the U.S. Spooner made the remark that those who swear to uphold the U.S. Constituion have not read it. Whatever Spooner's criticisms of the U.S. Constitution were, they pale into insignificance given the arbitrary use of political power since Post Civil War history. Yet, Spooner's essay and the footnotes to this collection are a reminder of what thoughtful men considered. This reviewer was told that these essays have been used in law schools which may be help some jurists and attorneys put the brakes on arbitrary political actions. This reviewer is reminded of the phony publicity given to some poltical hacks who extolled their Contract with American. When asked about whether if this applied to this reviewer, the answer was "No,where did I sign it and who authorized anyone to speak on my behalf?"

5-0 out of 5 stars Best if read several times...
. We would be amiss to state the pamphlet as redundant upon a single reading. It sounded quite repetitive to me the first time I read it. But, when I tried to summarize the theme, I found that the points Spooner makes include several distinct areas of discussion. And, it builds to a climax. He ultimately points out the real rulers of this country, "... these soulless blood-money loan-mongers... And now these lenders of blood-money demand their pay; and the government, so called, becomes their tool, their servile, slavish, villainous tool, to extort it from the labor of both the North and the South."
. Spooner repeats in places for emphasis, but the thread of his argument sweeps on through the various objections that one might raise along his route.
. If you think it repeats, try to outline it. You'll find that each section presents his point in another light.
. As a matter of fact, any attempt to state the theme in a paragraph would lower it to a statement of personal opinion rather than the masterful essay which it is.

Dan Marks
Republic of Texas
. ... Read more


4. Let's Abolish Government
by Lysander Spooner
Paperback: Pages (2007)
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Asin: B001BY9ZXW
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Lysander Spooner (1808-1887) is the American individualist anarchist and legal theorist, known mainly for setting up a commercial post office in competition with the government and thereby being shut down. But he was also the author of some of the most radical political and economic writings of the 19th century, and continues to have a huge influence on libertarian thinkers today. He was both a dedicated opponent of slavery in all its form, even going so far as to advocate guerrilla war to stop it, but also a dedicated opponent of the federal invasion of the South and its postwar reconstruction.

This collection was selected personally by Murray Rothbard as his best work. It includes "Trial by Jury," which argues for the idea of jury nullification, that is, the right of the jury to reject the law under which a defendant is tried. It also includes his "Letter to Grover Cleveland," which remains one of the most rigorous pieces of political argument ever penned. Finally, it includes his classic work "No Treason," which argues that the U.S. Constitution is not a social contract at all and that it cannot bind the current generation.

Spooner was obviously a great dissident -- and one of the most brilliant thinkers of the 19th century and an American original. His influence has been quiet but very long and pervasive.

The title here is of Rothbard's own choosing, but it sums up the theme of his best work.

419 pages, paperback, 2008 ... Read more

Customer Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Lysander Spooner, the anarchist
This edition of "Let's Abolish Government" is a reprint of an edition published in 1972 by Arno Press. It contains a selection of three works most directly expressive of Lysander Spooner's version of individualist anarchism. In "An Essay on the Trial by Jury," Spooner argues on theoretical and historical grounds for jury nullification, the position that juries may rightfully judge not only the facts in legal cases but also the justice of the laws being employed in such cases. Spooner conceives of juries as a means by which the people may resist unjust government laws on the basis of their knowledge of principles of natural law (i.e. the inalienable rights of life, liberty and property). "A Letter to Grover Cleveland" is a vigorous condemnation of the United States government, and by extension all governments, as intrinsically the enemy of the people and their natural rights. And in "No Treason," Spooner argues that the United States Constitution, insofar as it is a contract among freely consenting individuals, is legally and morally binding only on those persons who actually agreed to the contract 220 years ago, and is neither legally nor morally binding upon anyone else, including everyone alive today. Spooner's arguments are both rigorously argued and energetically expressed, a pleasing combination not often found in the anarchist literature. I recommend "Let's Abolish Government" for those interested in arguments for anarchism (and in particular the anarchocapitalist version of that doctrine), as well as those interested in legal history and constitutional law. ... Read more


5. Collected Works of Lysander Spooner (34 works/6 volumes)
by Lysander Spooner
 Library Binding: 2400 Pages (1971)

Isbn: 0877300062
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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5-0 out of 5 stars A Fearless 19th Century Intellectual
I bought this book for myself as a reward for finishing the first year of law school.Spooner isn't your everyday lawyer writing an everyday book.Spooner was a 19th Century radical abolitionist, who earned his law license by suing the Massachusetts Supreme Court.He is the father of cheap postage in America, the founder of the modern jury nullification movement in America, the source behind Fredrick Douglass' arguments about the unconstitutionality of slavery, and one of the bravest, most original thinkers America has ever produced.

This set of books belongs on the shelves of every American interested in the forgotten history of American intellectual resistance to tyranny. ... Read more


6. The Constitution of No Authority
by Lysander Spooner
Kindle Edition: Pages (2010-04-27)
list price: US$0.99
Asin: B003JMELDI
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The "constitution" (pretended) has no inherent authority or obligation. It has no authority or obligation at all, unless as a contract between man and man. And it does not so much as even purport to be a contract between persons now existing. It purports, at most, to be only a contract between persons living eighty years ago. [This essay was written in 1869.] ... Read more


7. The Spooner Collection: An Essay on the Trial by Jury, Vices are not Crimes, The Unconstitutionality of Slavery (with linked TOC)
by LYSANDER SPOONER
Kindle Edition: Pages (2010-03-31)
list price: US$3.99
Asin: B003EYVZKI
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This ebook is a collection of three books by Lysander Spooner and is complete with a linked Table of content to each book and within each book making navigation quicker and easier.

Lysander Spoonerwas an American individualist anarchist, entrepreneur, libertarian, political philosopher, abolitionist, supporter of the labor movement, and legal theorist of the nineteenth century. He is also known for competing with the U.S. Post Office with his American Letter Mail Company, which was forced out of business by the United States government. His activism began with his career as a lawyer, which itself violated Massachusetts law. Spooner had studied law under the prominent lawyers and politicians John Davis and Charles Allen, but he had never attended college. According to the laws of the state, college graduates were required to study with an attorney for three years, while non-graduates were required to do so for five years.

An Essay on the Trial by Jury is an excellent treatise on the reason we have the jury system available as a right within the Anglo-Saxon justice system and an excellent point of beginning for the study of Constitutional and Common Law.

Vices are not Crimes highlights the role that morality had for Spooner among the anarchists and libertarians of his day. Spooner was the last of the great natural-rights theorists among anarchists, classical liberals, or moral theorists.

The Unconstitutionality of Slavery advocats the view that the U.S. Constitution prohibited slavery. This view was advocated in contrast to that of William Lloyd Garrison who advocated opposing the constitution on the grounds that it supported slavery. ... Read more


8. Vices Are Not Crimes: A Vindication
by Lysander Spooner
Hardcover: 42 Pages (2010-05-23)
list price: US$30.95 -- used & new: US$22.43
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Asin: 1161484477
Average Customer Review: 1.0 out of 5 stars
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In the midst of this endless variety of opinion, what man, or what body of men, has the right to say, in regard to any particular action, or course of action, "we have tried this experiment, and determined every question involved in it? We have determined it, not only for ourselves, but for all others? And, as to all those who are weaker than we, we will coerce them to act in obedience to our conclusions? We will suffer no further experiment or inquiry by any one, and, consequently, no further acquisition of knowledge by anybody?" ... Read more

Customer Reviews (1)

1-0 out of 5 stars Terrible edition of a great work
Lysander Spooner -- libertarian, anarchist, feminist, legal theorist, anti-slavery activist, pro-labour activist, and economic reformer -- was one of the 19th century's greatest political thinkers, and his Vices Are Not Crimes is a well-argued critique of what today are called "victimless-crime laws."

But the Kessinger reprint edition is a disaster.It includes Spooner's footnote markers, but, through incredible sloppiness, omits all his actual footnotes!!!(It also misprints the subtitle of the book -- it's "A Vindication of Moral Liberty," not just "A Vindication.")

Try instead to get the out-of-print TANSTAAFL edition -- or else get the still-in-print Lysander Spooner Reader, which includes this work. ... Read more


9. Poverty: its illegal causes and legal cure.
by Lysander Spooner
Paperback: 108 Pages (1846-01-01)
list price: US$16.99 -- used & new: US$16.99
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Asin: 1429719362
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This volume is produced from digital images from the Cornell University Library Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection ... Read more


10. NO TREASON - The Constitution of No Authority - With Supplemental Essays
by Lysander Spooner
Kindle Edition: Pages (2008-08-24)
list price: US$4.99
Asin: B001ESN1S0
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CONTENTS AND CHAPTER SUMMARY:

Chapter 1
The Constitution Has No Inherent Authority Or Obligation

Chapter 2
As Voting Is Concerned, The Constitution, Legally Speaking,
Has No Supporters At All.

Chapter 3
The Payment Of Taxes, Being Compulsory, Of Course Furnishes
No Evidence That Any One Voluntarily Supports The Constitution

Chapter 4  
The Constitution Not Only Binds Nobody Now,
But it Never Did Bind Anybody.

Chapter 5
We Have What Purports, Or Professes, Or Is Claimed, To Be A Contract
-- The Constitution – Made By Men Who Are Now All Dead

Chapter 6
Nobody Is Individually Responsible For The Acts Of Congress,
The Members Of Congress Are Nobody's Agents.

Chapter 7   
If Any Considerable Number Of The People Believe
The Constitution To Be Good, Why Do They Not Sign It Themselves.

Chapter 8
The Constitution Itself, Then, Being Of No Authority,
On What Authority Does Our Government Practically Rest? 

Chapter 9
And We Are Insane Enough To Call This Liberty!

Chapter 10
There Exists No Such Thing As A Government Created By, Any Consent, Compact,
Or Agreement Of "The People Of The United States.

Chapter 11
The Oaths Which These Pretended Agents Of The People Take
"To Support The Constitution," Are Of No Validity Or Obligation.

Chapter 12
The Oaths Of The Tax-Gatherers And Treasurers Of The Band, Are,
On General Principles Of Law And Reason, Of No Validity. 

Chapter 13
On General Principles Of Law And Reason, The Oaths Which Foreigners Take,
On Coming Here, And Being "Naturalized", Are Of No Validity

Chapter 14
Oaths Were Given To A Secret Band Of Robbers And Murderers,
Who Called Themselves "The United States”

Chapter 15
The Oaths Of Soldiers, That They Will Obey The The Orders
Of Their Superior Officers…Are Of No Obligation.

Chapter 16
Our Pretended Ambassadors, Secretaries, Presidents, And Senators Profess To Make Treaties,
Are As Much Myths As Our Own.

Chapter 17
Debts Contracted In The Name Of "The United States," Or
Of "The People Of The United States," Are Of No Validity. 

Chapter 18
Who Are The Men, The Responsible Men, Who Rob Us Of Our Property? 

Chapter 19
These So-Called Presidents, Senators, And Representatives, These Pretended Agents Of All "The People Of The United States," The Moment Their Exactions Meet With Any Formidable Resistance From Any Portion Of "The People" Themselves, Are Obliged, Like Their Co-Robbers And Murderers In Europe, To Fly At Once To The Lenders Of Blood Money.

Appendix to No Treason: The Constitution of No Authory
The Government Has Been Made In Practice A Very Widely, And Almost Wholly,
Different Thing From What The Constitution Itself Purports To Authorize.

Supplemental Essay One – No Treason I

Supplemental Essay Two – No Treason II – The Constitution

... Read more

11.
 

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12.
 

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13.
 

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14. The unconstitutionality of slavery: including parts first and second
by Lysander Spooner
Paperback: 302 Pages (2010-06-26)
list price: US$29.75 -- used & new: US$17.57
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 117601109X
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Product Description
This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words.This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book. ... Read more


15. An Essay On The Trial By Jury
by Lysander Spooner
Hardcover: 224 Pages (2010-05-23)
list price: US$39.95 -- used & new: US$28.94
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1161421475
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
That the legislation of the king was of no authority over a jury, is further proved by the oath taken by the kings at their coronation. This oath seems to have been substantially the same, from the time of the Saxon kings, down to the seventeenth century, as will be seen from the authorities hereafter given. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (4)

3-0 out of 5 stars Typographical Errors Abound
The content of this book is vital to our understanding of the trial by jury, both broadening and ennobling the contemporary role of juror.

The book itself, however, is saturated with typographical errors.It looks as if the publisher scanned an old copy of the book into a program that 'reads' documents, and neglected to proofread it before sending it to press.This is incredibly disappointing given the importance of the topic and the meticulous care Spooner devotes to it.

I'm sorry I can't recommend a better edition of this book.All I can say is that I will not buy anything from this publisher in the future.

5-0 out of 5 stars Any eye opener
This book gives an eye opening look at our judicial system and why the trial by jury is so important.As one of the checks and balances of our constitution, it allows "the people" to keep government from issuing oppressive laws.They are the final arbiter of a laws fairness by their decision to convict or acquit.Despite the fact that judges and lawyers and others try to make a jury work "within" the system, the fact is, juries are allowed, encouraged and expected to judge the laws for themselves as members of the community as to their fairness.This process is called jury nullification.By this act, juries keep what laws they deem as meaningful, fair and honest.The rest are simply ignored.This is true in murder vs. self-defense, taxes, anything.

Spooner basically asserts that without this time honored tradition; that if a judge, lawyer or any official of the court or government can limit a jury to work strictly within the law that the trial is no longer a trial by jury or "the people" but a trial by the state, with an outcome that can be dictated and decided by it as well.In fact, even the act of a judge not allowing evidence in for consideration voids the trial and should immediately result in dismissal.The jury is allowed to hear all evidence, despite what technicality it is not allowed in for.They are the sole arbiter of what is right and wrong, good or evil.It is felt that no great knowledge of law is necessary to decide if someone is guilty or innocent and even if a law was broken the jury has every right to find a person innocent if they feel that what transpired was the right thing to do.

I recommend this book for those interested in freedom, justice and the constitution.It also gives excellent history of the trial by jury going back to its inception under the Magna Carta.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Jury system, still(more) flawed after all these years
This book, which was written in the 19th century, is as vital and significant today as the Constitution-and perhaps more important to the modern reader because of changes mad within the court system(but not the legal system) in the past century.

This is a very short book, but covers a very important and neglected part of the limitations of Government power: the trial by jury.

Jury trial rights predate the foundation of the United States, beginning with the signing of the Magna Carta in England in 1215.So the principles of jury trial were long established in the British Common Law upon which US Federal Law and most states (all but Louisiana, which is based upon Napoleonic Law.)

"FOR more than six hundred years that is, since Magna Carta, in 1215 there has been no clearer principle of English or American constitutional law, than that, in criminal cases, it is not only the right and duty of juries to judge what are the facts, what is the law, and what was the moral intent of the accused; but that it is also their right, and their primary and paramount duty, to judge of the justice of the law, and to hold all laws invalid, that are, in their opinion, unjust or oppressive, and all persons guiltless in violating, or resisting the execution of, such laws."

The purpose of a selected jury is to represent the population or country as a whole to judge the defendant, who represents the rights of the people. (i.e. the people as a whole, represented by the jurors, decide whether or not they desire the freedom to perform whatever actions are on trial.)

The purpose oftrial by jury, is to permit a "trial by country," opposed to a "trial by Government."Thus, in the final analysis, it is up to the people to determine which laws have been set by their Government they truly wish to obey, and not the Government'swill alone.

This is not the model, which they taught you in school, and it is at variance with the statements frequently made in court by judges.(Whose purpose in a jury trial is not to judge, but to provide order safety and advice.)

With an informed jury, no law may be enforced which the jury finds reprehensible, regardless of the opinions of the judges, legislators or police.Juries have the final say in whether or not a law is just and enforceable.

Truly, if this were otherwise, Tyranny is the result.If the Government declares the law, and the Government determines whether or not the law is valid, then the Peoiple have lost their freedom, and have only those freedoms left which the Government chooses to leave to them.

The legal mechanism is thus:The Legislature creates the law, the Executive puts the law into effect, and enforces the law, the Courts (in the form of the Jury, a randomly selected subset of the People,) determine if the law is valid.In our last hundred years, increasingly the function of the Courts, represented by the Jury, has come to be represented by the Judges, who are, of course, not a random selection of the People, but a selected part of the Government.

Our current Government has gone so far as to say that it will continue to hold (at least some) defendants, even if they are found innocent!

I highly recommend that all people subject to jury duty (adult citizens) read this book.Despite being written well over 100 years ago, it is quite clearly written, and being short and important to your liberty, will pay great dividends for the little time invested in reading.If you read one book this year, let this be the one.

5-0 out of 5 stars Best book on the subject
To properly understand the reason for the system of trial by jury one can do no better than to read Spooner's essay.He covers the history of the concept and the proper role of the "judge" and the rights of the jury.The concept of Jury Nullification and the need for it become clear with a reading of his work.One reading of Spooner's essay and you will never view our judicial system in the same light. ... Read more


16. Instead of A Magazine. An organ of the Lysander Spooner Society [Vol. 5, no. 36].
by Michael, ed Ziesing
 Paperback: Pages (1985)

Asin: B003NXX2E2
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17. Review of Lysander Spooner's essay on the unconstitutionality of slavery. Reprinted from the "Anti-slavery standard," with additions
by Wendell Phillips
Paperback: 102 Pages (2010-05-17)
list price: US$18.75 -- used & new: US$12.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1149534753
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words.This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book. ... Read more


18. Review of Lysander Spooner's essay on the unconstitutionality of slavery
by Wendell Phillips
Paperback: 108 Pages (2010-06-25)
list price: US$19.75 -- used & new: US$12.72
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1175787183
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words.This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book. ... Read more


19. Natural law, or the science of justice.
by Lysander Spooner
 Paperback: Pages (1974)

Asin: B0044244YI
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20. A defense for fugitive slaves, against the acts of Congress of February 12, 1793 and September 18, 1850
by Lysander Spooner
Paperback: 78 Pages (2010-05-13)
list price: US$17.75 -- used & new: US$11.12
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1149325526
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words.This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book. ... Read more


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