e99 Online Shopping Mall

Geometry.Net - the online learning center Help  
Home  - Book Author - Stallman Richard M (Books)

  1-20 of 46 | Next 20
A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

click price to see details     click image to enlarge     click link to go to the store

$17.36
1. Free Software, Free Society: Selected
$176.63
2. GNU Make: A Program for Directed
$35.00
3. Using GCC: The GNU Compiler Collection
$14.99
4. Debugging with GDB: The GNU Source-Level
$24.80
5. Texinfo: The GNU Documentation
 
6. Using and porting GNU CC
 
$261.35
7. Gnu Make
 
$28.50
8. GNU Emacs Manual Version 20
9. The GNU C Library Reference Manual
10. Bison Manual: Using the YACC-Compatible
 
$20.00
11. Debugging with Gdb: The Gnu Source-Level
$31.56
12. Using The Gnu Compiler Collection:
$39.95
13. GNU Emacs Manual, For Version
 
$25.00
14. Gnu Emacs Manual: Eleventh Edition,
 
$20.00
15. GNU Make: A Program for Directing
 
16. Debugging with GDB, Edition 4.03
 
17. Using and Porting GNU CC for Version
 
18. GNU Emacs Manual: -- Thirteenth
 
$50.00
19. Using & Porting Gnu Cc, Version
 
$15.00
20. Termcap Manual

1. Free Software, Free Society: Selected Essays of Richard M. Stallman
by Richard M. Stallman, Joshua Gay
Paperback: 230 Pages (2009-12-30)
list price: US$19.95 -- used & new: US$17.36
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1441436200
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
Free Software, Free Society: Selected Essays of Richard M. Stallman is a book by Joshua Gay compiling different essays of Richard M. Stallman. * The intersection of ethics, law, business and computer software is the subject of these essays and speeches by MacArthur Foundation Grant winner, Richard M. Stallman. This collection includes historical writings such as The GNU Manifesto, which defined and launched the activist Free Software Movement, along with new writings on hot topics in copyright, patent law, and the controversial issue of "trusted computing." Stallman takes a critical look at common abuses of copyright law and patents when applied to computer software programs, and how these abuses damage our entire society and remove our existing freedoms. He also discusses the social aspects of software and how free software can create community and social justice. * The first edition was published 8 years ago by GNU Press under the GNU Free Documentation License. * Essays contained in this book deal mainly about ethics, law, business and their application to computer software. * The introduction is written by Lawrence Lessig, professor at Stanford University. * The book is divided into three main parts, and also includes a fourth one with GNU licenses: [1] The GNU Project and the Free Software Foundation, [2] Copyrights, Copylefts and Patents, [3] Creating a Free Society, [4] GNU Licenses. * Money raised from the sale of this book supports the development of free software and documentation. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (5)

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Book to understand the Free Software movement and the principles that guide it.
This is the book to read to learn about the roots, the history of the Free Software movement started by Richard Stallman in the early 1980's.
Here in a single book are explained all the major principles of Free software. Also you can find the history of the GNU General Public license or GNU GPL for short. This is the most widely used free software license.

The origin of the GNU operating system and its variant the GNU/Linux operating system is also covered.

The importance of the Free software movement can not be overstated.
It is the Free software movement and its leading organization the Free Software Foundation that inspired other groups that have its origins in it such as the "Open source" movement.
The books explains the effects of copyright laws and patent law on innovation and society.

A must read. I fully recommend it.

5-0 out of 5 stars A must read for any Stallman fan
`Free Software, Free Society', a short, yet poignant book by renowned software freedom activist Richard Stallman demonstrates the importance of free software in society, a movement in which he has actively participated since joining a software-sharing community at MIT in 1971. Since then, Stallman has both advocated the importance and raised awareness of free software, battling copyright and founding clever terms such as "copyleft" and even "free software" itself. His book first describes GNU (Gnu's Not Unix), a free adaptation of the Unix operating system that Stallman created to promote a community of cooperative hackers. He also makes certain to precisely define his terms; Stallman both explains free software is `free as in freedom', not in price, and also distinguishes between the seemingly synonymous words of `free' and `open'. Richard Stallman later introduces the concept of `copyleft' (a method which mandates that software obtained from the public domain be passed along for others to further copy or change it) and analyzes problems and misinterpretations of copyright, explaining, for example, how copyright is not a natural right guaranteed by the Constitution, but rather a government-imposed monopoly. Stallman ends the book with a collection of miscellaneous, but relevant topics, such as `words to avoid' and GNU licensing.

Overall, I found Free Software, Free Society both interesting and informative. As one might expect, Richard Stallman does not write like most authors. Instead of employing a `style that sells' (i.e. "decorating" the book with irrelevant information or references in order to appeal to the largest audience possible), Stallman writes what he believes, regardless of whether it fits public opinion. He is articulate, strong, and convincing: he has a clear goal of informing the reader of everything related to the free software movement, and he draws from his own experience to support his stand. Although the book maintains an informative style, it is not written for the technical savvy (and for the basic understanding Stallman assumes the reader has, there is a section in the beginning of the book that reviews the fundamentals of software and computers). Of course, this does, at times, make the book feel more like a student textbook, though I nevertheless remained interested throughout the entire text. In short, I would undoubtedly recommend Free Software, Free Society to anyone with even a remote interest in computers, the internet, or law.

5-0 out of 5 stars CS Major Philosophy
Very good philosophy book on the reasons behind the free software movement. A very good read to understand Stallman, who after all, brought forth the Gnu project. Almost every computer has some piece of Gnu Public License software on it now, so it makes sense to read, even if you are a Windows or Macintosh person.

5-0 out of 5 stars Essential Reading for any Intelligent Adult Favoring Social Progress
I bought this book at Hackers on Planet Earth 6, and then after reading it in the morning, had the double benefit of hearing the author as keynote speaker in the afternoon.He is everything the book's contents suggest, and more.The author is one of the original MIT hackers (pick up a used copy of Shirley Turkle's "My Second Self, Computers and the Human Spirit" and/or Steven Levy's "Hacker's" which the author himself recommends.

The author's brilliant bottom line is quite clear throughout the book: software copyright prevents people from improving or sharing the foundation for progress in the digital era.

The author's social-technical innovation, which appears now to be acquiring tsunami force around the world, and is manifested in the Free/Open Source Software (F/OSS) movement that is being nurtured by governments worldwide from Brazil to China to Israel to the United Kingdom to Norway, is to modify copyright to a term he credits to another, copyleft, meaning that copyright in the new definition grants ALL permissions EXCEPT the permission to RESTRICT the enhancement and sharing of the software.

The author is also very careful to define the term free as meaning freedom of movement and growth, not free of price.GNU, his invention, removes computational obstacles to competition, and levels the playing field for more important innovations.In his view, the core issue is not about price, but about eliminating restrictions to freedom of sharing and enhancement.

On page 37 he sums up his life's purpose: "Proprietary and secret software is the moral equivalent of runners having a fist fight (during the race)" -- they all lose.

The author carefully distinguishes between the free and open source software, citing the first as a movement with values, the second as a process.

His candidacy for a Nobel Prize is captured in the sentence on page 61, "Free software contributes to human knowledge, non-free software does not."

Across the book, a collection of essays put into a very well ordered (not necessarily chronological) form, this book is a history of GNU (not UNIX) by its creator and co-founder of the Free Software Foundation.It is replete with concise useful discussions of terms, conditions, and cultures relevant to the future of mankind as a thinking forward looking species.

Section two, on copyright, copyleft, and patents is very helpful, and likely to become a standard in the field as the public fires elected representatives who sell out to Mickey Mouse copyright extenders, and demands a return to the original Constitutional limitation of copyright as an artifact of government, not a natural right, focused on nurturing knowledge.It means mention that Lawrence Lessig (see my reviews of his books) writes the introduction--the two authors together, along with Cass Sunstein, may be the most important trio of thinkers with respect to the future of man in the context of science, copyright, risk, and software as a human global contributor to sanity.

The author's keynote address at HOPE 6 is discussed toward the end of the book, where he lists the Four Freedoms:

Freedom 0: Run a program as you wish, for any purpose you wish, not limited to any narrowly defined application.

Freedom 1: Help yourself by improving the program (which requires access to source code).

Freedom 2: Help your neighbor by sharing a copy of the program with them.

Freedom 3: Help community by sharing the improved copy at large.

There is no question in my mind but that this manifesto of a single man's life's work is as important as Tom Paine's Common Sense treatises.There is a war now emergent between the classes (US elites bribing foreign elites, both screwing their publics over for private gain), and between corporations and the people, corporations long having abused the independent legal personality that was granted to promote business, and ended up being a legal barrier to holding corporate managers accountable for grand theft and social irresponsibility.

Toward the end the author offers thoughtful suggestions on how to "drop out" of the proprietary software world, and his thinking resonates with "No Logo" and its recommendations on selective purchasing.

This book is not a technical book although it offers up many understandable insights to technical matters underlying the social philosophy of the author.It is not a legal book either, but offers important informed commentary vital to getting the law focused again on human progress.Finally, in no way does the book dismiss the importance of capitalism--the author clearly states that it is entirely appropriate to charge a fee for one's contributions--this is about the "how" not the "how much.

Absolutely superb collection of essays, extremely important to where we go in the future.The author is not only an original hacker, he represents hacking as it should be understood by the authorities (see my review of Bruce Sterling, Hackers at the Edge of the Electronic Frontier), and as I see them--as people who have the "right stuff" and are testing the edge, pushing the frontier.In a world of drones, these are the libertarian spirits that may well keep us out of perpetual prison.

For reference: DARPA's STRONG ANGEL program, empowered now by DoD Directive 3000.cc. specifically seeks to create a suite of collaborative sharing and analytic tools that can be provided free to any non-governmental organization and any state and local government.Support costs have to be shared.It is now understood at the highest levels of the US military that we cannot make peace without sharing all information in all languages all the time (my third book), and this is progress.

5-0 out of 5 stars Nice Explanations
The editor wrote a short forward explaining all the computer concepts the reader will need in order to understand the book.In addition, there are footnotes throughout the book explaining obscure people and computer terms.This way even a sociology major like myself can understand everything.

Stallman talks about important issues that are currently being played out in Washington DC.This book is a great way to help make sense of it all. ... Read more


2. GNU Make: A Program for Directed Compilation
by Richard M. Stallman, Roland McGrath
Paperback: 196 Pages (2002-01-01)
list price: US$20.00 -- used & new: US$176.63
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1882114825
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
For GNU Make Version 3.79.1

The Make program is indispensable to maintainers of free software systems. The GNU Make manual, written by the program's original authors, is the definitive tutorial. It also includes an introductory chapter for novice users. The Make utility automates the process of compilation; it is especially useful when the source files of large programs change. It is a small program with a lot of power.

This book will show you:* How to write your own makefiles
* Make's rule syntax and how to write your own rules
* How the Make utility can be configured to automatically put binary and source files in the right places.
* How to use make to create archive files automatically
* Define, set and use Make's variables
* How Make uses targets so that you can broaden or narrow Make's recompilation efforts on demand.
* And much more!

This manual provides a complete explanation of Make, both the basics and extended features. There is also a convenient Quick Reference appendix for experts. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (6)

5-0 out of 5 stars Sooner or later you really should read this book
Unless you've got your eyes closed, sooner or later you're going to have a software build that fails because a makefile doesn't do what you expected. Actually you probably just expected it to work, and didn't think you'd have to actually read and understand this language which isn't C, C#, Java, or Ruby. But, like the stuck bolt on the motorcycle in Zen and The Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, GNU Make is what stands between the Linux software developer and his compiled software project. In roughly 150 pages of tireless clarity, Stallman and McGrath explain every detail of GNU Make. Bonus chapters at the end include a good coding standard "Chapter 14: Makefile Conventions", and a quick reference. Which will actually be useful once you've read the book.

3-0 out of 5 stars Just a reference, does not give you the wider picture.
This is just a reference, written in a style a bit too terse. Not good as a tutorial.
For a wider picture and introduction, see Managing Projects With Make (I believe the newer editions only cover GNUMake, which is different than what BSD developers use).

5-0 out of 5 stars Clear and Complete
I'll add to the positive remarks of other reviewers that this book will help you understand why features that work with one version of make do not work with another. The section "Features of GNU 'make'" contains information on which features came from which 'make' implementation; this gives the reader some historical context and information that not all 'make' programs are created equal. This information is especially valuable when working with a number of different 'make' utilities from different vendors (happily, GNU make runs on almost any platform most users are likely to encounter, and installing GNU make on a machine may be much easier than wrestling with the differences between 'make' implementations).

I refer to this book (or the info version from within emacs) regularly. I have found it extremely helpful while trying to figure out how another Makefile works, while trying to figure out how to accomplish a particular task with 'make', and just for general knowledge about the tool. I found the sections on suffix rules and pattern rules to be particularly informative.

One final note: by purchasing this book you are helping to support free software, as the book is published by GNU Press, the publishing department of the Free Software Foundation.

5-0 out of 5 stars One Book which lets all others fading
This is an excellent book for software developers who want to write Makefile seriously. I have read other make books, including "Managing Projects with make" and "Mastering Make". None of them present core of Makefile to readers. From newsgroup comp.unix.shell one can know that there are still a lot of people who are struggling for writting their own real Makefile. Richard and Roland are national outstanding experts in this area!

4-0 out of 5 stars Good reference
This book, which was made available on the Web for free, is here published in book form for those who prefer it that way. It is a great introduction to GNU Make for beginners who need to learn it, and a good reference for those more experienced.

After a brief overview of make in chapter 1, the authors move on to introduce makefiles in chapter 2 and 3. A general makefile consists of rules, with a target, dependencies, and commands. The authors do a great job of explaining makefiles and give a sample makefile explaining how an executable depends on object files, those depending themselves on C source files and header files. The use of'make clean' is discussed also, along with the use of variables to simplify makefiles.

A more detailed discussion of rule writing is given in chapter 4, with the rule syntax outlined, and how to use wildcard characters in file names. The 'vpath' directive is discussed also. The authors show how to construct rules with multiple targets, and how to use dependencies that are not necessarily identical using static pattern rules. The chapter ends with a discussion of how to generate dependencies automatically.

The use of command echoing is explained in the next chapter on writing commands in rules, with the recursive use of 'make' as itself a command in a makefile. This is followed in chapter 6 by more details on the use of variables in makefiles. Readers knowing the shell very well will find this easy reading, but beginners will have to pay attention to the subtle uses of variable references and the difference between recursively expanded and simply expanded variables. The authors include an advanced section on variable reference for the more experienced reader. A detailed discussion on using conditional statements in makefiles is given.

The use of functions to do text processing is the subject of chapter 8 with the general syntax for function calls given. This is followed in chapter 9 by a discussion on how to actually execute a makefile.

The use of implicit rules to perform compilation in the usual way is discussed in chapter 10. This is my preference on how to use make and it is given a nice treatment here, with discussions on how to use implicit rules and introduces pattern rules.

Make can also update archive files, and this is discussed in chapter 11. The last chapters of the book give a list of features of GNU make as compared with other versions of make, and a list of incompatibilities of make with other versions. The conventions that must be respected in writing GNU make programs are discussed also. ... Read more


3. Using GCC: The GNU Compiler Collection Reference Manual for GCC 3.3.1
by Richard M. Stallman
Paperback: 432 Pages (2003-10)
list price: US$45.00 -- used & new: US$35.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1882114396
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
The definitive reference manual for the most widely used compiler in the world, written by the program's original author and its current developers. The GNU Compiler Collection is a full-featured ANSI C compiler with support for C, C++, Objective C, Java and Fortran as well as libraries for all these languages, such as libstdc++ and libgcj.

This book covers:

* The complete list of GCC command options.

* All the Objective-C runtime features.

* GCC support for C and C++ language standards.

* Extending C and C++ beyond the current standards.

* Special features of GCC's C, C++, and ObjC support.

* Fine tuning programs for your platform of choice.

This reference is intended for intermediate or above programmers. It assumes that the reader is already familiar with the basics of either C, C++ or Objective C languages. This edition of the book covers new features included with GCC version 3.3, while remaining compatible with earlier versions. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (1)

4-0 out of 5 stars Gcc now handles key set of languages
Given the the author of this book wrote the original gcc, and has been closely involved with its development in the intervening years, you can safely regard the book as definitive.

Stallman clearly is writing for someone already familiar with C. Very little of your time is wasted by wading through elementary material.

When I first used gcc years ago, it was just that: strictly for compiling C programs. But Stallman and other developers have dramatically expanded the scope. Now, the book describes how gcc can handle a key set of languages - the original (ANSI) C, C++, Fortran and Java. The set of C, C++ and Fortran probably spans most engineering and scientific legacy applications. Terrific value! ... Read more


4. Debugging with GDB: The GNU Source-Level Debugger
by Richard M. Stallman, Roland Pesch, Stan Shebs
Paperback: 346 Pages (2002-01-01)
list price: US$30.00 -- used & new: US$14.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1882114884
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
The GNU Debugger allows you to see what is going on "inside" a program while it executes - or what a program was doing at the moment it crashed.

GDB supports C, C++, Java, Fortran and Assembly among other languages; it is also designed to work closely with the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC).

The GNU Debugger Program has four special features that helps you catch bugs in the act:

* It starts your program for you, specifying anything that might affect it's behavior.
* Makes your program stop under specified conditions.
* Examines what happened when the program stopped.
* Allows you to experiment with changes to see what effect they have on the program.

This book will show you:

* setting and clearing breakpoints
* examining the stack, source files and data
* examining the symbol table
* altering program execution
* specifying a target for debugging
* how to control the debugger
* how to use canned command sequences
* how to install GDB
* and much more!

This manual is written for programmers. It is designed so someone can begin utilizing GDB after just reading the first chapter, or read the whole manual and master the program. Synopsis of ideas and extensive examples are given. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (7)

5-0 out of 5 stars Everything you need to learn gdb
This is the best way to learn gdb, either as a reference or as a study material.It covers a lot.

gdb is the most used debugger and this book covers what you need no matter
what you want to do.

gdb is used on many platforms, ranging from vxworks, windows, mac, gnu/linux, unix, etc.gdb is the most powerful debugger and therefore
a book like this is a must because no gui frontend gives you full control

5-0 out of 5 stars GDB to a programmer is like a rifle to a soldier
Every serious programmer knows how invaluable the GNU debugger GDB for his or her work.Although, the content of this GDB manual is freely available, I find it very handy to have a hard copy.It is not surprising that the manual is well written because it has been revised many times by many developers of the open source community.

4-0 out of 5 stars Worth the money
Even though this entire book is available online, I find it useful to own it.Starts with a simple example, which is my favorite way of getting started.

4-0 out of 5 stars Found the answer I want
I was looking for information on cross-platform debugging. This manual provides adequate information. A printed manual is sometime helpful when you are so tired looking at the over crowded screen. Good reference! If you are trying to learn the machanism of debugging, you have to find some other book.

4-0 out of 5 stars Have to respect Stallman
Lets see if Amazon.com allows the link. You have to respect
the wishes of a man like Richard Stallman. ... Read more


5. Texinfo: The GNU Documentation Format
by Robert J. Chassell, Richard M. Stallman
Paperback: Pages (1999-12)
list price: US$25.00 -- used & new: US$24.80
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1882114671
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
This tutorial is the authoritative text for the official documentation formatting language used for all GNU Project manuals. It assumes no previous Texinfo knowledge and includes many examples and exercises. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (1)

4-0 out of 5 stars A Good Book
This book makes using Texinfo painless. It explains the terms that first time layout designers may be unaware of.Each chapter focuses on a separate task; that and the index makes it easy to find what you need right now. It also provides sample code and reference tables.

I just skimmed through the first several chapters, and then looked up what I needed to find in the index. The only down side is the book assumes you are probably using the Emacs editor.This can be confusing in the first chapter or two.But those parts can be skipped over. ... Read more


6. Using and porting GNU CC
by Richard M Stallman
 Unknown Binding: 420 Pages (1993)

Isbn: 1882114353
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

7. Gnu Make
by Richard M. Stallman, Roland McGrath
 Paperback: 162 Pages (1996-12)
list price: US$20.00 -- used & new: US$261.35
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1882114787
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

8. GNU Emacs Manual Version 20
by Richard M. Stallman
 Paperback: 528 Pages (1997-07)
list price: US$30.00 -- used & new: US$28.50
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 188211406X
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

Customer Reviews (2)

5-0 out of 5 stars The big enchilada
In the emacs world, this is 'The Book' by 'The Man.' Emacs is an indispensible tool imho. I use it, to this very day, under Windows XP.

What's the best way to learn emacs? Buy a book, like this one, dive in and don't come out until you start to 'get it.'

When I sit back and think why I still use emacs, and ferret out all the reasons, it truly ends up being completely non-bigotry related.Emacs just literally does many things better for a certain class of text-processing activities.It's a tool in the same way UNIX shell scripting is; a tool I'll probably never live without.

What does emacs have/do that's head & shoulders better than other editors?Well, literally the list is quite long, but for starters: Regular expressions everywhere, navigation keystrokes for every conceivable structure & sub-structure of a text document, real unlimited undo, non-trivial keyboard macros, and of course for ultimate flexibility an embedded lisp interpreter.

Word is nice - I did write a fairly large novel with it - but to this day I write many many shorter documents with emacs first.Truly. Word does have some amazing features, no joke, but for a certain class of text processing activities emacs will probably always rule.

Software takes money to write, and emacs is, imho, one of the software 'pyramids' that have withstood the test of time. If you believe in the free software movement and want to learn emacs, why not buy a copy of a book by one of the men who was truly instrumental in the free software movement?

5-0 out of 5 stars This guy knows what he is talking about
Great book about an essential software development tools. Emacs has shown it value for decades and its extensiblity keeps is up-to-date and useful for every software programming task.

I believe money for the sale of this book goes to support free software, a great cause.

(...). ... Read more


9. The GNU C Library Reference Manual
by Sandra Loosemore, Richard M. Stallman
Paperback: 1275 Pages (2001-07-01)
list price: US$60.00
Isbn: 1882114558
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
For GLibc version 2.2.x

This two volume manual is the comprehensive guide to the GNU implementation of the standard C libraries. It covers both high and low level interfaces, including function specifications, code examples, and usage recommendations. This text includes items of interest to both the system administrator and the programmer. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (3)

4-0 out of 5 stars C programmer should always have a copy of this book.
I am a computer user without any great school diploma but who like to learn how things work inside. I have the gnu/linux system on my computer for few years now and I am using it almost every day.

Believe me, you need this book. If you have minimum knowledge of C programing, it will explain the printf function in detail. If you need more than this, take a look in the part about sockets and tcp/ip.

This is called "Reference Manual" but it's more than a simple alphabetical list of all the function. Each subjects have a chapter that begin with a few paragraph to introduct the subject and they put examples where necessary. (No need to open your computer to see them like in others books I have seen)

Another good point is the way you can find a page in the book.

- There is a Table of content ;-)

- A concept index(where you can find something like "Comparison Function" or "creating a socket")

- A Type Index(with all the data types used by the library),

- A "Function and Macro Index" (Where are they talking about the printf thing?)

- A "Variable and Constant Macro Index" (What is errno?)

- And something cool. An appendix they call "Summary of Library Facilities" it's contain all the functions (and macro, var, ..) with: the header file you need to include, the system it come from (is it a POSIX function? SunOs specific?) and the page number.

Since you can install GCC and glibc on almost any unix like computer (And widows with cygwin). By the way they explan the installation process in the book.

And since the book talk also a litle about the native library of others system.

Well. Read it.

When I began to learn C in linux, I was using the 'info' command or the FSF web site to read the book . (Because it's also available online!) But I should have buy a printed copy long ago. This book have 1079 pages. And lets say that a coder use only the half (that he would read a couple of time for reference). That's insane! Don't lose all this time on the computer. Read it in you bead or whatever but not on the screen. In fact the indexes are soo well done that it's almost fast that any kind of hyper link.

If you want to check the online version: http://www.fsf.org/manual/glibc-2.0.6/libc.html

I almost forget. They also spend few pages in the printed copy for things like contributors and the full text of the LGPL. You may not want to pay for this but it is somehow in the spirit of open source software. Isn't it?

The only reason I put 4 stars rather than 5 is that this book is for Version 1.09 Beta while the publisher, FSF, are printing the one for version 2.2 (Edition 0.09 DRAFT but not that draft at all).

4-0 out of 5 stars C programmer should always have a copy of this book.
I am a computer user without any great school diploma but who like to learn how things work inside. I have the gnu/linux system on my computer for few years now and I am using it almost every day.

Believe me, you need this book. If you have minimum knowledge of C programing, it will explain the printf function in detail. If you need more than this, take a look in the part about sockets and tcp/ip.

This is called "Reference Manual" but it's more than a simple alphabetical list of all the function. Each subjects have a chapter that begin with a few paragraph to introduct the subject and they put examples where necessary. (No need to open your computer to see them like in others books I have seen)

Another good point is the way you can find a page in the book.

- There is a Table of content ;-)

- A concept index(where you can find something like "Comparison Function" or "creating a socket")

- A Type Index(with all the data types used by the library),

- A "Function and Macro Index" (Where are they talking about the printf thing?)

- A "Variable and Constant Macro Index" (What is errno?)

- And something cool. An appendix they call "Summary of Library Facilities" it's contain all the functions (and macro, var, ..) with: the header file you need to include, the system it come from (is it a POSIX function? SunOs specific?) and the page number.

Since you can install GCC and glibc on almost any unix like computer (And widows with cygwin). By the way they explan the installation process in the book.

And since the book talk also a litle about the native library of others system.

Well. Read it.

When I began to learn C in linux, I was using the 'info' command or the FSF web site to read the book . (Because it's also available online!) But I should have buy a printed copy long ago. This book have 1079 pages. And lets say that a coder use only the half (that he would read a couple of time for reference). That's insane! Don't lose all this time on the computer. Read it in you bead or whatever but not on the screen. In fact the indexes are soo well done that it's almost fast that any kind of hyper link.

If you want to check the online version: http://www.fsf.org/manual/glibc-2.0.6/libc.html

I almost forget. They also spend few pages in the printed copy for things like contributors and the full text of the LGPL. You may not want to pay for this but it is somehow in the spirit of open source software. Isn't it?

The only reason I put 4 stars rather than 5 is that this book is for Version 1.09 Beta while the publisher, FSF, are printing the one for version 2.2 (Edition 0.09 DRAFT but not that draft at all).

4-0 out of 5 stars Ultimate linux programming manual(674pgs)
This is a great reference manual on linux programming.It is clearly and concisely written, and covers almost everything on the GNU library(the basis for linux programming).It also includes many good examples thatmake learning a snap.This book did not get five stars because it is onlya beta book.It includes three indexes(concept,function,file).It has aplastic binding. ... Read more


10. Bison Manual: Using the YACC-Compatible Parser Generator
by Charles Donnelly, Richard M. Stallman
Paperback: 130 Pages (2002-08-01)
list price: US$20.00
Isbn: 1882114345
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
For Bison Version 1.35

Bison is a general-purpose YACC-compatible parser generator that converts a grammar description for an LALR(1) context-free grammar into a C program to parse that grammar. Once proficient, it can be used to develop a wide range of language parsers, from those used in simple desk calculators to complex programming languages.

This book teaches:
* Basic concepts of context-free grammars
* Basic concepts of semantic values and actions
* Bison grammar rules and syntax
* Stages in writing and running Bison grammars
* C-language interface to the parser function yyparse()
* How to use multiple parsers in the same program
* To detect when an operation for a new node type was not implemented
* To ensure that a new operation covers all existing node types adequately
* The Lexical Analyzer Function yylex() and parser C-language interface yyparse()
* Writing rules for error recovery
* And how to use Bison under DOS/Windows and VMS systems.

This book assumes the reader already knows the C Programming Language. The Bison manual provides a quick overview of the theory behind context-free grammars and semantic values. The introductory tutorial section explains the basic concepts of using Bison and shows three examples, each building on the last. If you don't know Bison or Yacc, start by reading these chapters. The following reference sections explain in greater detail and also cover other supporting programs such as yyparse(), yylex(), and yyerror(). A glossary and symbol table are also included. ... Read more


11. Debugging with Gdb: The Gnu Source-Level Debugger, for Gdb Version 4.18
by Richard M. Stallman
 Paperback: 206 Pages (1999-02-01)
list price: US$20.00 -- used & new: US$20.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1882114760
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

12. Using The Gnu Compiler Collection: A Gnu Manual For Gcc Version 4.3.3
by Richard M. Stallman, GCC DeveloperCommunity
Paperback: 636 Pages (2009-03-20)
list price: US$39.99 -- used & new: US$31.56
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 144141276X
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
Using the GNU COMPILER Collection. A GNU Manual for GCC Version 4.3.3. This manual documents how to use the GNU compilers, as well as their features and incompatibilities,and how to report bugs. It corresponds to the compilers (GCC) version 4.3.3. *** Money raised from the sale of this book supports the development of free software and documentation. ... Read more


13. GNU Emacs Manual, For Version 21, 15th Edition
by Richard M. Stallman
Paperback: 644 Pages (2002-08-01)
list price: US$20.00 -- used & new: US$39.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 188211485X
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
GNU Emacs is much more than a simple word processor. Over the years it has expanded into an entire work flow environment. Programmers will be impressed by its integrated debugging and project management features. Emacs is also a multi-lingual word processor, can handle all your email and Usenet news needs, display web pages, and even has a diary and a calendar for your appointments! And when you tire of all the work you can accomplish with it, there are games to play.

Features include:
* Special editing modes for 25 programming languages including Java, Perl, C, C++, Objective C, Fortran, Lisp, Scheme, and Pascal.
* Special scripting language modes for Bash, other common shells, and creating Makefiles for GNU/Linux, UNIX, Windows/DOS and VMS systems.
* Support for typing and displaying in 21 non-English languages, including Chinese, Czech, Hindi, Hebrew, Russian, Vietnamese and all Western European languages.
* Creates Postscript output from plain text files and has special editing modes for LaTeX and TeX
* Compile and debug from inside Emacs
* Maintain program ChangeLogs
* Extensive file merge and diff functions
* Directory navigation: flag, move and delete files and sub-directories recursively.
* Run shell commands from inside Emacs, or even use Emacs as a shell itself (Eshell)
* Set up tag tables
* Version control management for release and beta versions, with CVS and RCS integration and much more!

This book picks up where the introductory on-line tutorial included with Emacs ends. It explains the full range of Emacs' power and contains reference material useful to expert users. Appendixes with specific material for MacIntosh and Microsoft OS users are included. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (4)

5-0 out of 5 stars Most excellent reference
Got the book two years ago while working as an adm. tech for a small company. I was familiar with vi but decided this one was more customizable. Got the latest copy just to update for the job.

5-0 out of 5 stars This is THE GNU Emacs Manual
This book was issued to me while working as a consultant for Northern Telecom (Nortel.) They standardized on this editor, as it was the most efficient for their environment. The above description of the back cover pretty much tells it all. Mine is an earlier edition but the picture is still the same. The book comes with a Lay Flat Binding. There is a Short Content and several page Table of Contents. Also the GNU Manifesto, Glossary, Key (Character) Index, Command and Function Index, Variable Index and Concept Index. You seldom need to go outside this reference Manual.

5-0 out of 5 stars excellent reference
This book is the only reference you need for Emacs v21. It is written by Richard Stallman, the original author of Emacs and about a gazillion other brilliant pieces of software, not to mention he is the founder of the GNU project and the FSF. The book is basically packed with useful information. It has a good table of contents and several good indexes (Key (Character) index, Command and function index, variable index and concept index). Some of the things you find are not compatable with earlier versions of emacs, and they are not always noted, but hopefully you can download the latest version anyways.

It covers the basics like opening/editting/saving files, getting online help, cutting/copying/pasting, searching/replacing, and simeltaneously working on multiple documents. Most of these simple things are also helpfully summarized on a tear-out reference card in the back. The book, however, goes into great, great detail, providing you with the massive power that Emacs (the one editor to rule them all) has.

Some other parts of the book that I found useful were the chapters covering backup files, version control (w/ RCS), major modes (i.e., modes in which the behavior of Emacs changes to suit the type of buffer you are working on. E.g., automatic indentation and highlighting in C-mode), integrated compiling with gcc and debugging with gdb, and dired (the file system browser with primative commands for deleting and other simple things). I would have been (and was) seriously lost trying to custimize Emacs without this book.

Other topics covered that I haven't yet mentioned are registers, international character support, tag tables, merging files, email and web browsing capabilities, the calender/diaries, and many other odds and ends.
What this book does not cover is the vast Emacs Lisp system. That is why I'm back on Amazon today to check out the Lisp Reference Manual. Since the Lisp manual is 900+ pages, and this book is already about 600 pages, it's easy to see why they seperated these two. My only gripe with this book is that it has terrible binding :( Oh well, it still easily merits 5 stars.

5-0 out of 5 stars only clear and useful information
The book covers the complete use of Emacs (except programming Lisp extensions).
The text is most of the time clear and consise. All you will read is useful information. Moreover you often find anwsers to your questions as if the author has anticipated it (probably the experience of the 15 previous editions).
What could be better is the conceptual description of Emacs: What are the variables attached to each buffer, how the major/minor modes affects the variables ... finally what make the state of Emacs at a given time.
As a conclusion: We would like many more books of this quality. ... Read more


14. Gnu Emacs Manual: Eleventh Edition, Version 19.29 June 1995
by Richard M. Stallman
 Paperback: 470 Pages (1995-06)
list price: US$25.00 -- used & new: US$25.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1882114523
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

15. GNU Make: A Program for Directing Recompilation, Edition 0.43, for Version 3.68
by Richard M. Stallman, Roland McGrath
 Paperback: 152 Pages (1993-06)
list price: US$20.00 -- used & new: US$20.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1882114167
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

16. Debugging with GDB, Edition 4.03 for GDB Version 4.3, January 1992
by Richard M. / Pesch, Roland H. Stallman
 Paperback: Pages (1992-01-01)

Asin: B001UFPUW2
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

17. Using and Porting GNU CC for Version 2.8
by Richard M. Stallman, Richard Stallman
 Paperback: 545 Pages (1998-03)
list price: US$50.00
Isbn: 188211437X
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

18. GNU Emacs Manual: -- Thirteenth 13th Edition, Updated for Emacs Version 20.1
by Richard M. Stallman
 Paperback: Pages (1997)

Asin: B00469H9PK
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

19. Using & Porting Gnu Cc, Version 2.3
by Richard M. Stallman
 Paperback: Pages (1993-12)
list price: US$50.00 -- used & new: US$50.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1882114191
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

20. Termcap Manual
by Richard M. Stallman
 Paperback: Pages (1993-06)
list price: US$15.00 -- used & new: US$15.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1882114132
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan

  1-20 of 46 | Next 20
A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

Prices listed on this site are subject to change without notice.
Questions on ordering or shipping? click here for help.

site stats