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$7.95
1. The Art of War
$9.19
2. The Art of War - Sun Tzu's Classic
$8.55
3. Understanding Sun Tzu on the Art
$4.92
4. The Art of War
$19.39
5. The Art of War by Sun Tzu - Deluxe
$4.45
6. The Art of War (History and Warfare)
$6.95
7. Sun Tzu: The Art of War (Restored
$19.73
8. The Art of War by Sun Tzu - Special
 
$22.33
9. The Art Of War: The Oldest Military
$6.99
10. Sun Tzu For Success: How to Use
$12.00
11. The Art of Warfare (Classics of
$2.00
12. Sun Tzu Strategies for Selling:
$10.54
13. The Art of War -- Spirituality
$2.69
14. Sun Tzu For Execution: How to
$39.63
15. From Sun Tzu to Xbox: War and
$11.20
16. Sun Tzu and the Art of Business:
$3.71
17. The Art of War
$7.12
18. Sun Tzu: The Art of War for Managers;
$3.90
19. Sun Tzu Was a Sissy: Conquer Your
$14.00
20. The Art of War: An Illustrated

1. The Art of War
by Sun Tzu
Paperback: 58 Pages (2010-10-15)
list price: US$7.95 -- used & new: US$7.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1452820562
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
Unabridged and complete version of Sun Tzu's THE ART OF WAR. Heritage Cross Classcics produces high-quality classics in their original form.WHAT IS THE ART OF WAR?The Art of War is one of the oldest and most successful books on strategy. It has had an influence on Eastern thinking, business tactics, and beyond. Sun Tzu suggested the importance of positioning in strategy and that position is affected both by the environment and the opinions of the leaders in that environment. He believed that strategy was not planning in the sense of working through an established list, but rather that it requires quick and appropriate responses to changing conditions. Planning works in a controlled environment, but in a changing environment, competing plans collide, creating unexpected situations. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (72)

4-0 out of 5 stars A wonderful abridged version
As with any ancient text, translation matters greatly. Fortunately, this version isn't fraught with errors and mistranslations, at times, common in free ebooks. The content needs no praise or introduction as it remains an influential and widely applicable text. A recommended read.

1-0 out of 5 stars poor layout - poorly edited
Fortunately, I only tried the sample on my Kindle. Would have been a 100% loss since the text seems to be hardly edited and incomplete.

The layout on the Kindle is terrible.

Dont't buy this. Shame on Amazon for trying to sell such a flawed product!

I'd rather go for a free and complete edition by Project Gutenberg. Or look for a different edition.

4-0 out of 5 stars Classic strategy text - bit clumsy in places but hugely relevant for business and the corporate world today
I agree that the translation can be a bit clumsy in places but if you overlook that you can fiind some real gems inside this unusual little book.

I love the relevance of so many of the concepts and every time I flick through I find a new lesson or a new way to apply the same lessons in a different context. "Only fight your battles after the victory has been won." Loving' it.

5-0 out of 5 stars classic
what a classic piece!i ordered this through my kindle for $0, so, the price was perfect!honestly, i can not comment on the quality of the translation.i assume that it is accurate.i found that it was a fast read, until i stopped and thought about what he was saying.the author's comments often coincided with the places where i felt the need to stop and reflect.this was superb and it is a book that i intend to re-read.while i prefer peace to war, the content herein can be applied to even peaceful efforts.i highly recommend this book for every cadet in the academies and junior officers.everybody else with an interest in the strategies and tactics of competitive engagement also would benefit from reading this.i give this a solid "A".

5-0 out of 5 stars Great insight
I've always wanted to read this book, and when I saw it for free I just had to go for it. It's not the smoothest read, but the principles throughout this book can be used in battle, sports or business. Download it and see if you can't apply some of what's in here to your own life. ... Read more


2. The Art of War - Sun Tzu's Classic in Plain English With Sun Pin's : The Art of Warfare
by Sun Tzu, Sun Pin, D. E. Tarver
Paperback: 180 Pages (2002-04-19)
list price: US$14.95 -- used & new: US$9.19
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0595224725
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
Book One of The Warrior Series

Sun Tzu and Sun PinÂ’s timeless strategic masterpieces are constantly analyzed and interpreted by leaders worldwide. For the first time ever, author D.E. Tarver explains the classic texts, The Art of War by Sun Tzu and The Art of Warfare by Sun Pin, in plain English.

War is the perfect training ground for teaching Sun TzuÂ’s ancient philosophies to attaining victory over an opponent. The Art of War outlines the steps for outwitting the enemy, be it an army of 10,000 or an unresponsive client.

The Art of War teaches leaders strategies to attain victory by:

  • Knowing when to stand up to an opponent, and when to back down.
  • How to be confident without being overly confident.
  • Considering the cost of the campaign before launching an attack.
  • Avoiding an opponentÂ’s strengths and striking his weaknesses.

“The one who is first to the field of battle has time to rest, while his opponent rushes into the conflict weary and confused. The first will be fresh and alert. The second will waste most of his energy trying to catch up.” Be the first to the battlefield with The Art of War.

... Read more

Customer Reviews (24)

1-0 out of 5 stars Dumb and dumber
The Art of War - Sun Tzu's Classic in PLAIN ENGLISH.years ago I once started reading a copy of the popular classic, The Art of War.Disappointed and frustrated, I found myself having a difficult time understanding the concepts and principals addressed in the material due to how it was written. I threw it out in the trash.Fast forward to a few weeks ago, I purchased this copy of The Art of War - IN PLAIN ENGLISH only to find .. it was most likely written for a child's reading level.Again, another copy of The Art of War thrown into the trash.I would suggest reading "48 Laws of Power" instead which uses some of the same basic principals as described and taught in The Art of War.

1-0 out of 5 stars Disappointing
I was less than thrilled with the quality of this publication.There were numerous spelling and grammatical errors--very unprofessional.It made me question the accuracy of the translation.I have read excerpts from other translations, and they do not necessarily agree with this author's interpretations.I should have spent a little more money and purchased a version with a more reliable perspective...

4-0 out of 5 stars Great Book
The thing I like most about the book is that the author is straightforward and cuts to the chase. He doesn't attempt to sound really philosophical, so the reader doesn't tend to lose focus or interest while reading. It is a good, simple, quick read, which is also very informative and helpful.

I recommend this book to any and everyone. Whether you are in the military (GOD bless you all and thank you), a manager in any business, a student, or just a regular person doing nothing, this book can be applied to everyone's life. I hope this review was helpful, but even more, I hope you all read this book!

3-0 out of 5 stars A few grains of truth in a lot of chaff
Today many of Sun Tzu quotas are floating around mixed with Shakespeare and the Bible. And as with many of the quotes, they are out of context and misleading. The quoter usually thinks repeating the word is some sort of magic.

It is easy with hindsight and a closer look at the future to dismiss Sun Tzu as his practical tactical knowledge is of a time and place long gone. He spends a lot of time on the use of weapons and information gathering techniques of the time. This can be interesting in a historical context; other wise it is quite amusing.

Oh yes those grains of truth I mentioned, well they may sound like clichés but thy are still viable. "Know your enemy and know yourself". Others are just practical sense and statistical outcomes that you learn in any military training. I could go through the list, but again that is why you buy the book.

Now just as you decide that the book is outdated for any practical purposes today we have artillery and now stealth and precision, the reminder that "no two wars are alike" and "it is flexibility that makes a difference" is being shown today to still be true. Even in today's wars there is a need for good intelligence and deception. We put a lot of time and energy into Psy-Ops. Sun Tzu shows the advantage in specialized units and crack troops.

I have spent several years in the military and in business and can say this book is a nice addition to history, otherwise of very little value to today's world for war or business.

It real challenge to the reader is which edition to purchase. Each edition brings with it different supplements and translations which can add viewpoints of the person(s) compiling the edition. So look at the details of the edition first if possible.

The Battle for Gaul: A New Illustrated Translation

4-0 out of 5 stars Big fan.
I read a longer bigger version that took the simple ideas of the art of war and drew out lengthy examples and details on what they were talking about and what Sun was talking about. THis book really condenses that info. Its like cliffnotes for the Art of War. I didn't even realize that it also has the Art of Warfare until I finished the first half. See the book is actually two in one. About mid way through the book the Art of War wraps up and the second half is the Art of Warfare. Makes for a good deal to get a simple overall idea on the two texts. ... Read more


3. Understanding Sun Tzu on the Art of War
by Robert Cantrell
Paperback: 128 Pages (2004-07-15)
list price: US$14.95 -- used & new: US$8.55
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0972291407
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
Understanding Sun Tzu on the Art of War is both a source and an interpretation of Sun Tzu's Art of War written to clarify Sun Tzu's philosophies on war without compromising the subtlety of thought needed to master them. Readers of this book, from across professional disciplines, will find key advice on leadership, advantage, and how to proficiently overcome adversaries. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (9)

5-0 out of 5 stars I am ready
Whatever battle comes my way. I have read the Art of War and
think I 'get it' and will do well.

5-0 out of 5 stars More than you bargained for.
In looking at the previous reviews, I would be out of place if I gave this book anything other than a 5 star rating.More importantly, I would be undervaluing it.The approach to the Art of War takes on a new perspective when the author brings into play the I Ching (Way of Life) to show the contrasting as well as similar viewpoints of these two powerful pieces of ancient literature that help us live our lives today.Cantrell's background certainly allows him to understand the interplay with modern business paradigms, but there is a deeper meaning that runs through his elucidative work here that affects every relationship you or I will have in our lives whether they be adversarial or cooperative.This book really does belong in everybody's library.

5-0 out of 5 stars One of the most important military books in history
The Warring States period Warring States Period 475-221 BCE is a history of constant warfare, of alliances and counter-alliances, and of treaties made and broken.The nature of warfare evolved during the period.During the Warring States period, political stability was impossible to gain by adventurous military action.With the advent of swelling ranks of soldiers, protracted sieges, and an ever increasing drain on state treasuries, warfare became a serious matter for study.

Thus, the opening remark of "The Art Of War" states--without exaggeration--war had become the most serious business of the state, the key to survival or ruin. The author of this and other pithy aphorisms on how to successfully fight a war was Sun Tzu.Sun Tzu scholars place his writing "The Art of War" in the Warring States Period, based on the descriptions of warfare in the text. The book has received great exposure in the west starting in the eighteenth century after being translated by a French missionary.It has been reported that Napoleon studied the text and effectively put many of its teachings to good use.For the past 2,000 years, it has been the most important military treatise in all of Asia, even known by name with the common people.Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese military figures have studied it and employed its concepts to good effect.This is especially evident in the military tactics of 20th century revolutionaries like Mao Zedong and Ho Chi Minh.

The book is comprised of 13 chapters.The thesis of Sun's work is one should employ an army after a thorough analysis mandated by careful planning and the formulation of an overall strategy before embarking on a campaign.Sun emphasizes rational self-control, influenced by Daoist teachings throughout the book.

Chap 1-Laying Plans
18. All warfare is based on deception. 19. Hence, when able to attack, we must seem unable; when using our forces, we must seem inactive; when we are near, we must make the enemy believe we are far away; when far away, we must make him believe we are near.

Chap 6-Weak Points And Strong
8. Hence that general is skillful in attack whose opponent does not know what to defend; and he is skillful in defense whose opponent does not know what to attack.

The best translation is the Samuel B. Griffith edition

5-0 out of 5 stars One of the most important military books in history
The Warring States period Warring States Period 475-221 BCE is a history of constant warfare, of alliances and counter-alliances, and of treaties made and broken.The nature of warfare evolved during the period.During the Warring States period, political stability was impossible to gain by adventurous military action.With the advent of swelling ranks of soldiers, protracted sieges, and an ever increasing drain on state treasuries, warfare became a serious matter for study.

Thus, the opening remark of "The Art Of War" states--without exaggeration--war had become the most serious business of the state, the key to survival or ruin. The author of this and other pithy aphorisms on how to successfully fight a war was Sun Tzu.Sun Tzu scholars place his writing "The Art of War" in the Warring States Period, based on the descriptions of warfare in the text. The book has received great exposure in the west starting in the eighteenth century after being translated by a French missionary.It has been reported that Napoleon studied the text and effectively put many of its teachings to good use.For the past 2,000 years, it has been the most important military treatise in all of Asia, even known by name with the common people.Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese military figures have studied it and employed its concepts to good effect.This is especially evident in the military tactics of 20th century revolutionaries like Mao Zedong and Ho Chi Minh.

The book is comprised of 13 chapters.The thesis of Sun's work is one should employ an army after a thorough analysis mandated by careful planning and the formulation of an overall strategy before embarking on a campaign.Sun emphasizes rational self-control, influenced by Daoist teachings throughout the book.

Chap 1-Laying Plans
18. All warfare is based on deception. 19. Hence, when able to attack, we must seem unable; when using our forces, we must seem inactive; when we are near, we must make the enemy believe we are far away; when far away, we must make him believe we are near.

Chap 6-Weak Points And Strong
8. Hence that general is skillful in attack whose opponent does not know what to defend; and he is skillful in defense whose opponent does not know what to attack.

The best translation is the Samuel B. Griffith edition

5-0 out of 5 stars War as reality and war as metaphor
On the one hand, this movie line is seared, seared into my memory:
"Sun-tzu: If your enemy is superior, evade him. If angry, irritate him. If equally matched, fight, and if not split and reevaluate."Bud Fox (Charlie Sheen) "Wall Street"

On the other hand, as we face the threat of global terrorism rather than superpower competition or nation state agression, nothing is more pertinent to the reality of conflict that Sun-.

My point is whether you wish insight into the day-to-day conflict of business, or into current global trends, Sun-tzu is absolutely essential, and this well-written, well-edited book belongs in your library. ... Read more


4. The Art of War
by Sun Tzu
Paperback: 197 Pages (1971-09-15)
list price: US$11.95 -- used & new: US$4.92
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0195014766
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
Written in China over two thousand years ago, Sun Tzu's The Art of War provides the first known attempt to formulate a rational basis for the planning and conduct of military operations. These wise, aphoristic essays contain principles acted upon by such twentieth-century Chinese generals as Mao Tse Tung. Samuel Griffith offers a much-needed translation of this classic which makes it even more relevant to the modern world. Including an explanatory introduction and selected commentaries on the work, this edition makes Sun Tzu's timeless classic extremely accessible to students of Chinese history and culture, as well as to anyone interested in the highly volatile military and political issues in present-day China. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (140)

1-0 out of 5 stars the english language he griffith uses is a barrier
the average person who can speak perfect english wont understand many dictionary words he uses to translate the art of war. unless you understand rocket science words, check out thomas cleary's version.

5-0 out of 5 stars Timeless Advice
William Shakespeare and Sun Tzu lived many centuries ago.Yet, for us, they are as fresh and new as modern writers.Their common thread is that of universality.The former imbued his characters with the emotions of Everyman; human characteristics that remain constant throughout the ages.The latter, a Chinese warrior general, understood the mind of his men, but more importantly, the mind of his enemy.

Sun Tzu's approach to leading his army and conquering the enemy is valuable for us, too.His tactics can be used in the business world, in family dynamics, in social settings, in schools, etc.

As you read, think of any circumstances you would like to improve.For example, at work you have someone who is competing with you for a promotion.Your opponent has many strengths, but...
"So in war, the way is to avoid what is strong and to strike at what is weak,"
- Sun Tzu.

Take Sun Tzu's advice.Use your ability to highlight your opponent's weaknesses.If you do that, s/he won't be the 'stand-out' candidate any longer.

Picture a social setting in which a bully or taunting person has the upper hand.Sun Tzu said, ""To capture the enemy's entire army is better than to destroy it; to take intact a regiment, a company, or a squad is better than to destroy them. For to win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the supreme of excellence. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the supreme excellence."Find a way to cultivate a friendship.It will be better and easier than bringing down the individual.What's more, you will be seen by others as being superior.

I would put Sun Tzu and his wisdom against any modern advice writer of our times.







5-0 out of 5 stars the art of war
Well written and organized book.Not a strict translation but a narration of original work.

4-0 out of 5 stars Very good book
I like the clear language of the actual book. Although it is short, I recommend it be read various times.

5-0 out of 5 stars The gold standard
I've read at least one other translation of this work and the Samuel B. Griffith translation is much preferred. By comparison his language is elegant, almost bordering on poetry compared to the dry prose of another writer's newer translation. Yet, the content is clear, never being compromised in favor of style.

There are almost 300 reviews of this text, so there's no need to repeat what's already been said. If you're looking to own a copy of this classic I'd strongly recommend not just this book, but this particular translation as well.

... Read more


5. The Art of War by Sun Tzu - Deluxe Hardcover Edition
by Sun Tzu
Hardcover: 260 Pages (2009-06-22)
list price: US$29.95 -- used & new: US$19.39
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1934255165
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
This collectible edition of "The Art of War" presents Sun Tzu's timeless instructions regarding military strategy and managing conflict in two complete versions.

A modern introduction, tracing the origins of "The Art of War" and its historical and cultural importance, firmly grounds the reader in the context with which this oldest of military treatises has survived the ages, as well as contemporary examples of its continued use.

The first part contains "The Art of War" in English, without notes or commentary. This allows the reader to understand the teachings of Sun Tzu, without the distraction of footnotes or excessive comments. This newly revised translation is succinct and very easy to read.

The second part contains the complete annotated translation by Lionel Giles, along with his definitive critical commentary and supplemental information from a broad range of sources. Written during the Victorian era, Giles' 1910 "Introduction" has also been included, containing the legend of Sun Tzu and The Army of Concubines.

Although written in the 6th century BCE, the teachings of Sun Tzu are still found today in the martial arts, legal doctrine, military schools, management seminars and pervasively throughout popular culture.

Excerpt from The Art of War by Sun Tzu - Deluxe Hardcover Edition
© Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Sun Tzu said: Whoever is first in the field and awaits the coming of the enemy, will be fresh for the fight; whoever is second in the field and has to hasten to battle will arrive exhausted.

Therefore the clever combatant imposes his will on the enemy, but does not allow the enemy's will to be imposed on him.

By holding out advantages to him, he can cause the enemy to approach of his own accord; or, by inflicting damage, he can make it impossible for the enemy to draw near.

If the enemy is taking his ease, he can harass him; if well supplied with food, he can starve him out; if quietly encamped, he can force him to move. Appear at points which the enemy must hasten to defend; march swiftly to places where you are not expected.

An army may march great distances without distress, if it marches through country where the enemy is not.

You can be sure of succeeding in your attacks if you only attack places which are undefended. You can ensure the safety of your defense if you only hold positions that cannot be attacked.

Hence that general is skillful in attack whose opponent does not know what to defend; and he is skillful in defense whose opponent does not know what to attack.
... Read more

Customer Reviews (10)

5-0 out of 5 stars The Art of War
So far, I am enjoying this book. It has things inside I never would have considered. Yet so much of this makes perfect sense. Would recommend.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Warring States period Warring States Period 475-221 BCE is a history of constant warfare, of alliances and counter-alliances
The Warring States period Warring States Period 475-221 BCE is a history of constant warfare, of alliances and counter-alliances, and of treaties made and broken.The nature of warfare evolved during the period.During the Warring States period, political stability was impossible to gain by adventurous military action.With the advent of swelling ranks of soldiers, protracted sieges, and an ever increasing drain on state treasuries, warfare became a serious matter for study.

Thus, the opening remark of "The Art Of War" states--without exaggeration--war had become the most serious business of the state, the key to survival or ruin. The author of this and other pithy aphorisms on how to successfully fight a war was Sun Tzu.Sun Tzu scholars place his writing "The Art of War" in the Warring States Period, based on the descriptions of warfare in the text. The book has received great exposure in the west starting in the eighteenth century after being translated by a French missionary.It has been reported that Napoleon studied the text and effectively put many of its teachings to good use.For the past 2,000 years, it has been the most important military treatise in all of Asia, even known by name with the common people.Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese military figures have studied it and employed its concepts to good effect.This is especially evident in the military tactics of 20th century revolutionaries like Mao Zedong and Ho Chi Minh.

The book is comprised of 13 chapters.The thesis of Sun's work is one should employ an army after a thorough analysis mandated by careful planning and the formulation of an overall strategy before embarking on a campaign.Sun emphasizes rational self-control, influenced by Daoist teachings throughout the book.

Chap 1-Laying Plans
18. All warfare is based on deception. 19. Hence, when able to attack, we must seem unable; when using our forces, we must seem inactive; when we are near, we must make the enemy believe we are far away; when far away, we must make him believe we are near.

Chap 6-Weak Points And Strong
8. Hence that general is skillful in attack whose opponent does not know what to defend; and he is skillful in defense whose opponent does not know what to attack.

The best translation is the Samuel B. Griffith edition

5-0 out of 5 stars One of the most important military books in history
The Warring States period Warring States Period 475-221 BCE is a history of constant warfare, of alliances and counter-alliances, and of treaties made and broken.The nature of warfare evolved during the period.During the Warring States period, political stability was impossible to gain by adventurous military action.With the advent of swelling ranks of soldiers, protracted sieges, and an ever increasing drain on state treasuries, warfare became a serious matter for study.

Thus, the opening remark of "The Art Of War" states--without exaggeration--war had become the most serious business of the state, the key to survival or ruin. The author of this and other pithy aphorisms on how to successfully fight a war was Sun Tzu.Sun Tzu scholars place his writing "The Art of War" in the Warring States Period, based on the descriptions of warfare in the text. The book has received great exposure in the west starting in the eighteenth century after being translated by a French missionary.It has been reported that Napoleon studied the text and effectively put many of its teachings to good use.For the past 2,000 years, it has been the most important military treatise in all of Asia, even known by name with the common people.Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese military figures have studied it and employed its concepts to good effect.This is especially evident in the military tactics of 20th century revolutionaries like Mao Zedong and Ho Chi Minh.

The book is comprised of 13 chapters.The thesis of Sun's work is one should employ an army after a thorough analysis mandated by careful planning and the formulation of an overall strategy before embarking on a campaign.Sun emphasizes rational self-control, influenced by Daoist teachings throughout the book.

Chap 1-Laying Plans
18. All warfare is based on deception. 19. Hence, when able to attack, we must seem unable; when using our forces, we must seem inactive; when we are near, we must make the enemy believe we are far away; when far away, we must make him believe we are near.

Chap 6-Weak Points And Strong
8. Hence that general is skillful in attack whose opponent does not know what to defend; and he is skillful in defense whose opponent does not know what to attack.

The best translation is the Samuel B. Griffith edition

5-0 out of 5 stars One of the most important military books in history
The Warring States period Warring States Period 475-221 BCE is a history of constant warfare, of alliances and counter-alliances, and of treaties made and broken.The nature of warfare evolved during the period.During the Warring States period, political stability was impossible to gain by adventurous military action.With the advent of swelling ranks of soldiers, protracted sieges, and an ever increasing drain on state treasuries, warfare became a serious matter for study.

Thus, the opening remark of "The Art Of War" states--without exaggeration--war had become the most serious business of the state, the key to survival or ruin. The author of this and other pithy aphorisms on how to successfully fight a war was Sun Tzu.Sun Tzu scholars place his writing "The Art of War" in the Warring States Period, based on the descriptions of warfare in the text. The book has received great exposure in the west starting in the eighteenth century after being translated by a French missionary.It has been reported that Napoleon studied the text and effectively put many of its teachings to good use.For the past 2,000 years, it has been the most important military treatise in all of Asia, even known by name with the common people.Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese military figures have studied it and employed its concepts to good effect.This is especially evident in the military tactics of 20th century revolutionaries like Mao Zedong and Ho Chi Minh.

The book is comprised of 13 chapters.The thesis of Sun's work is one should employ an army after a thorough analysis mandated by careful planning and the formulation of an overall strategy before embarking on a campaign.Sun emphasizes rational self-control, influenced by Daoist teachings throughout the book.

Chap 1-Laying Plans
18. All warfare is based on deception. 19. Hence, when able to attack, we must seem unable; when using our forces, we must seem inactive; when we are near, we must make the enemy believe we are far away; when far away, we must make him believe we are near.

Chap 6-Weak Points And Strong
8. Hence that general is skillful in attack whose opponent does not know what to defend; and he is skillful in defense whose opponent does not know what to attack.

The best translation is the Samuel B. Griffith edition

4-0 out of 5 stars Very Pleased!
Who would of thought that war could have such a precise, simplified and honorable step-by-step instruction manual?And that it was written in the 6th century BCE? Sun Tzu's recipe for strategies and engagements is easy to read, with numbered instructions, for just about every war-like situation.And, as the editor points out in the Modern Introduction, these instructions can easily be transferable to the boardroom, sales techniques, athletic endeavors and the like.
I highly recommend "The Art of War", especially for anyone who is interested in the history and the controversy surrounding this man, Sun Tzu and the ancient art of war.The commentary and analysis portion of the book is quite detailed and serves well in taking the reader beyond the simple instructions Sun Tzu describes.I enjoyed it!
... Read more


6. The Art of War (History and Warfare)
by Sun Tzu
Paperback: 384 Pages (1994-02-11)
list price: US$16.95 -- used & new: US$4.45
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 081331951X
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description

Sun-Tzu is a landmark translation of the Chinese classic that is without a doubt one of the most important books of all time. Popularly known as The Art of War, Sun-Tzu is one of the leading books on strategic thinking ever written. While other books on strategy, wisdom, and philosophy come and go, both leaders and gentle contemplators alike have embraced the writings of Sun-tzu.

Sun-Tzu is not simply another of many translations already available, but an entirely new text, based on manuscripts recently discovered in Linyi, China, that predates all previous texts by as much as one thousand years. In translating the text, researcher and interpreter J. H. Huang traced the roots of the language to before 221 B.C. to get to the original intent; Besides offering a wonderfully clear translation, Huang adds an introduction to the history behind Sun-Tzu and his own comments on the meaning of the text. In addition, Sun-Tzu includes six appendices, five of which were uncovered at Linyi and are not found in other editions.The writings of Sun-tzu have stood the test of time, and J. H. Huang's Sun-Tzu is the edition for the next millennium and beyond. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (22)

4-0 out of 5 stars Art of War
I got this book for a college class. I learned a lot from this centuries new old book. It's about power, how to plan for it; obtain it, and keep it. I learned a great deal about how governments and businesses work with power. Interesting book.

5-0 out of 5 stars Good Book
Very easy read of this great classic with a great translation job. Makes you think about strategy for the battle field and for life in general. Ultimately it is up to the reader to take whatever they can from this great classic.

5-0 out of 5 stars Art of War
Great book, it came 100% new. No markings or dog-eared pages. I was a little worried about buying a book for only $0.01 ($3.99 S&H), but I was willing to spend $4.00.
Con: It did take a few days to ship but well worth the wait.

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent and thorough translation of Sun Tzu with a fascinating section explaining the historical context of the book
I don't need to go into a poetic toast on why this book is good, so I'll give some (hopefully) useful information that may concern anyone worried about the quality of this particular version of the book. (My rating is also based on the authorship of this version. If you JUST want the Art of War text, you can find it for free at any number of places on-line, such as Project Gutenberg: [...]).



First, Sawyer is a scholar in Chinese history - he really knows his stuff so I'll say first that the translation is, at least, adequate (I know Chinese myself). It is all very objective and you won't find anything frustrating here.

Second, only about 30% of the book is actually Sun Tzu's Art of War. The rest of it is additional stuff of Sawyer's authorship. BUT the stuff he adds is NOT bad. Read below for a description.

You can look at the index in preview of the book, but I'll give a quick summary of what is in the book:
1) The first ~150 pages contain a summary history of China leading up to the time when the book (Sun Tzu) was written and explains the context in which the book was written (he explains the types of weapons, armor, vehicles, agriculture, political organization, etc, of the time period).
2) The ACTUAL book itself (Sun Tzu's Art of War) is about 80 or so pages. He leaves plenty on gaps between each page here and margins on the side, so you have plenty of room to write in notes if you desire. (I did myself to elucidate some of what is said in the text. Sun Tzu had a very mystical and Phynx-like, or "sagacious" as Sawyer would call it, way of writing).
3) The last major section is the end notes to the first ~250 pages. This section is about 80 or so pages long (but the text is MUCH smaller than the rest of the book and leaves very fewer blank pages or gaps. It probably amounts to 100-150 pages if made the same text size as the rest of the book).

Third, I would recommend skipping the notes section (#3) until you have read The Art of War over once, because he literally puts a half-a-page-long note after each sentence and after about reading 10 pages of the actual book, you'll find that you are at note 50-something. So for 10 pages of actual text from the book, you would have read 20 pages or more in notes. It is can get very tedious.

The notes themselves aren't bad though. He explains a lot of ambiguous stuff. He gives either additional historical context to what is being said, compares what is said in this book to other Chinese military books (I found this in particular hugely helpful), or gives alternative translations (typically they are significant changes) with his opinion on which one is more correct.



All in all great book. You can't go wrong. You just might be annoyed with the number of end notes, but they aren't of bad quality and are generally very helpful.

5-0 out of 5 stars Looking forward to reading it!
Very good price, fast shipping, book was in great condition.I have read excerpts from this book through the years and a I am excited to finally read it in its entirety. ... Read more


7. Sun Tzu: The Art of War (Restored Translation)
by Sun Tzu
Paperback: 60 Pages (2010-10-15)
list price: US$6.95 -- used & new: US$6.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1453875182
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
THE ART OF WAR is the oldest, and is still regarded as one of the best, war manuals ever written. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (7)

5-0 out of 5 stars Art of War
The book arrived really fast and was in excellent shape. Great read. This version is the closest to what I read in school.

5-0 out of 5 stars Fundamental Considerations of War
Originally read this 40 years ago and foolishly loaned out the book.Given the involvement in 2 current international combat missions, the re-read was timely.Required reading for all war critics, politicians and professional, career military.Insights from Sun Tsu are over 2500 years old (time of classical Greece), yet are applicable today as illustration of stability of human conflict over 25 centuries.Not much cultural improvement in the Art of Peace!

5-0 out of 5 stars GREAT SERVICE
A PLEASURE TO DO BUSINESS THIS VENDOR AND AMAZON. COM. GOOD PRICE GREAT BOOK AND ON TIME.

5-0 out of 5 stars LaMoor
The war is within. Must be in a peaceful state to understand this book. The opposition in any war is self. Good reading. I enjoyed The Art of Peace more so.

5-0 out of 5 stars This book should be in every Hotel room
What is there to say when it comes to the content of this book? This is a must read for every man. This book gives guidelines not only applicable in war, but applicable to peace as well. The point is, that everything can be characterized as war (exams, job, relationships, family, ...), so in that sense this book is rather philosophical. Still, it contains very practical guidelines for your personal and business strategy. I have definitely evolved after reading this book as I have applied some of the concepts and values described, in my daily routines. I have read it twice. I will read it again for sure. ... Read more


8. The Art of War by Sun Tzu - Special Edition
by Sun Tzu
Hardcover: 268 Pages (2007-06-22)
list price: US$29.95 -- used & new: US$19.73
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1934255122
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
This special edition of The Art of War by Sun Tzu presents this timeless classic in two forms:

Section I contains the complete thirteen chapters of Sun Tzu's masterpiece in Chinese, with the facing page English translation by Lionel Giles, without notes or commentary. This presentation avoids the objection that commentary tends to clutter and obscure the clarity of thought of the ancient military genius.

Section II contains the complete Giles translation of The Art of War, including his extensive introduction, and the fully annotated text with explanatory notes and critical commentary. His 1910 introduction includes an historical account of Sun Tzu's work, evaluations by and of early Chinese commentators, an essay examining the traditional Chinese attitudes toward war and a bibliography that details Giles' source materials. The text in this section includes critical commentary and notes by both Chinese historians as well as by Giles himself.

Lionel Giles, as the Keeper of the Department of Oriental printed Books and Manuscripts of the British Museum, was uniquely qualified to translate and explain this great classic Chinese work to Western readers. First published in 1910, Giles' translation is widely considered to be the definitive English version. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (34)

5-0 out of 5 stars Wisdom for the ages
My father worked at the Naval Surface Weapons Center (now Naval Surface Warfare Center) for many years.I had exposure to issues of politics, strategy, and tactics from a very young age.One of my earliest memories was holding on to his pants leg and looking up at him as he discussed something in the paper.The topics tended to be violent, such as My Lai.I was born in 1968 and the 70s were a rough, turbulent time.

I heard about things like the Assassination of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand at the dinner table.When I learned a little bit about physics, I said that I learned about physics from my father.Like, how he knew what happened and could talk about the angle of the gun and the ricochet effect and the slant of sun and etc - whether my father did talk about things exactly that way, I'm a little unclear, but he was very knowledgeable and he knew about this stuff from a physical point of view as well.

Once a question came up when I was in grade school about which presidents were assassinated in the 20th century. I was one of the few who knew that McKinley was on this list, having been killed in Buffalo in 1901.

There are a lot of people who think that "The Prince" is the go-to book for strategy.

In my father's view, and mine as well, a lot of people are incorrect.The Prince will tell you some things.But for THE succinct, no-holds-barred, lay-it-on-the-line source, it is The Art Of War.

One reason why I think The Prince is preferred is that it is not as ruthless as the art of war.Machiavelli had been a public servant/government employee and there was a change in administration so to speak.He was viewed as "bad" tortured and fired.He went to a remote place to recover and wrote the Prince - partly to get back in the good graces of those in power.

Here are a few sentences that show why The Art of War will be preferred by many over the Prince, to those who think about strategy:

"The Prince examines the acquisition, perpetuation, and use of political power in the western world. Machiavelli wrote The Prince to prove his proficiency in the art of the state, offering advice on how a prince might gain and keep power.

Machiavelli justified rule by force rather than by law. Accordingly, The Prince seems to justify a number of actions done solely to perpetuate power. It is a classic study of power--its acquisition, expansion, and effective use."

----

The word used here is "justify" and "justified."Justifying is not observing.It is making a case.Yes there is a lot of wisdom here but Machiavelli's emotions were involved and he was arguing a case like a lawyer might, in some ways.

His advice in many ways was harsh.That can lead a reader to overlook the fact that it is possible to be a LOT worse than this.

See the excerpt, above.Sun Tzu wants to control the women.They laugh and refuse to cooperate.He beheads the two favorite courtesans.Even the king tries to stop this but Sun Tzu says, you gave me the responsibility......and then, it is rule by terror, with no getting out of control again.A really good way to end insubordination.

Many/most wars are not fought like this.This is how you fight when you have no regard at all for the humanity of the soldiers you are commanding.To say that The Art of War is too much for some people, or that some prefer The Prince, is not to say they are "bad" or they don't know war, or they won't defend their country.It is to say more or less - that many people will react with revulsion when or if they read an excerpt in which the women are punished for a few minutes of silliness by having the two most "favorite" courtesans beheaded, and even new orders from the king cannot stop this.

I told my husband about this and he said, Sun Tzu should have been beheaded instead.It is hard for me not to have sympathy for that point of view.

Still, this advice works.It will work but the people who will make it work tend to be ruthless (meaning:without compassion).This book has stood the test of time for a reason.But do you win the war and lose your soul? (If you ever had one.)Who does this ruthlessly and consistently unless it is one who seems to place little value on human life?

Unless, things are very very very dangerous and there is an extremely important war that MUST be won.That's a different story.But thinking about a book that recommends execution for a few minutes of insubordination - I find it difficult to believe a commander would take that advice, that far.Many people who use this don't take all of the advice literally.

That is why a lot of people who read this book will do so for informational purposes and/or to use it and they will take it only so far.The Prince is not sanitized by any means, and it describes some tough choices but personally - it never made my stomach turn the way The Art Of War did.

**edited to add**

I have to admit my view is colored not by the book itself, but by the number of wars the United States has gotten into in the last few decades that I believe were not a good idea, in the first place.Sun Tzu warns people against fighting stupid wars, but from what I have seen, too many times, powerful people don't face their fears and then they start a war against "the enemy" (Russia in the Cold War, Iraq, Vietnam, etc.).Strictly speaking, that is an issue of misuse of this book, I believe.

There is some very profound wisdom here that I don't think gets enough attention:

Hence the saying:

If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles.

If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory gained you will also suffer a defeat.

If you know neither the enemy nor yourself, you will succumb in every battle.

This is very, very true.Someone who knows the enemy and knows himself can be extremely dangerous.Yet, there is a situation not addressed here:

If you know the enemy, and do not know yourself, what happens then?

Well it seems bizarre that that would happen, yet too many times people deceive themselves about any number of things.They think they are prettier/kinder/more popular/smarter/more compassionate, and etc. than they really are.These things involve inflated ego.(Some people are self-deprecating and say things like, I like looking smart.That's not what I'm talking about.I mean someone who looks at a true genius and says, 'I could do much better than that, easily, even without trying hard' when that's totally untrue.)

But what can be really dangerous is when a brilliant person has deceived himself into thinking he is stupid.Let's say, the Dan Quayle effect in reverse.This person will still have the use of his brilliance but will come across as nothing to write home about, b/c he has convinced himself he is not impressive.To some degree, some women and members of minority groups have been impacted by this.People can be very bright but they were convinced by others that they are not.If such people turn to resentment and start to think of truly brilliant people (such as "white males" who have succeeded greatly) with envy, they can become poisoned by envy.In many ways I strongly support feminism but there is that strain of resentment and envy in some of it and it makes me very, very uncomfortable.If I need to tear someone else down to build myself up, something is wrong.

The Civil Rights movement did not achieve its gains that way.People requested/demanded that their human dignity be recognized.Many whites had deceived themselves into thinking they were nice, good people who would not hurt a fly, while they were in some way involved in suppressing others' rights.That is one example of deceiving oneself.The Civil Rights movement was a really good thing, and in a way it was a kind of "war."

And then there is the famous quote:

All war is deception.When the enemy is far, let them think you are near; when they are near, let them think you are far; when you are weak, let them think you are strong....There is more, and I am paraphrasing but that is the gist of it.

People who fight wars like this can be defeated by someone else who reads the same information and has knowledge and compassion and says, hey, why are we fighting in the first place?That is a hard question to answer given this approach and the extremity and terror-inducing quality of it.It is a huge time sink, devoting one's thoughts to defeating "the enemy," and in many ways, what's the point?Many times people you think are the enemy, are not, and someone who is forever trying to be deceptive and fight an eternal battle is really wasting a lot of time.Time spent on such pursuits can seriously limit and block insight.

My advice:This book will teach a lot but it might scare people as it should if it is really taken seriously.Might be good to make sure the war is worth fighting, in the first place.

5-0 out of 5 stars Tactics
This is Sun Tzu!. What can be added to?? If I was working in a Board Room/ office situation, or if I was again a police officer, or if I was a hardware buyer (instead of being retired), this work would be in close proximty all the time. Try to adapt and understand how it works and overlays today. When the info is mastered; start passing it down to your kids.:))

This is real 5-Star material.

4-0 out of 5 stars Multiple sections equal multiple goodness...
The knowledge contained within the original thirteen chapters of Sun Tzu has continued to fascinate users for hundreds of years primarily because it can be applied to a multitude of challenges that every human being must face on a daily basis. Whether these challenges pertain to business, sports, or life in general, applying the teachings of Sun Tzu will strengthen one's ability to emerge victorious and gain a better understanding of how to prepare for future trials.

I currently own five versions of The Art of War. Some are collegiate versions that contain historical and factual information accompanied by a translation and insight, while others are designed to be more recreational. This version, translated by Lionel Giles, is my favorite of the recreational versions, as it is light and enjoyable, yet contains the general fundamentals of the original text.

The book is divided into two "forms" or sections. The first contains in Chinese the original (doubtful) thirteen chapters along with an English translation, which allows the reader to formulate their own insights into the readings. The second also contains a translation, but is accompanied by Giles' insight, which is in agreement (more or less) with most others that I've read and is very well written.

I for one appreciate the multiple forms because they allow the book to be read in various ways. For instance, a
new reader can use these sections to gain familiarity with the writings, while more familiar readers can appreciate the writings without the PhD dissertation. Either way, any reader can enjoy this book.

5-0 out of 5 stars One of the most important military books in history
The Warring States period Warring States Period 475-221 BCE is a history of constant warfare, of alliances and counter-alliances, and of treaties made and broken.The nature of warfare evolved during the period.During the Warring States period, political stability was impossible to gain by adventurous military action.With the advent of swelling ranks of soldiers, protracted sieges, and an ever increasing drain on state treasuries, warfare became a serious matter for study.

Thus, the opening remark of "The Art Of War" states--without exaggeration--war had become the most serious business of the state, the key to survival or ruin. The author of this and other pithy aphorisms on how to successfully fight a war was Sun Tzu.Sun Tzu scholars place his writing "The Art of War" in the Warring States Period, based on the descriptions of warfare in the text. The book has received great exposure in the west starting in the eighteenth century after being translated by a French missionary.It has been reported that Napoleon studied the text and effectively put many of its teachings to good use.For the past 2,000 years, it has been the most important military treatise in all of Asia, even known by name with the common people.Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese military figures have studied it and employed its concepts to good effect.This is especially evident in the military tactics of 20th century revolutionaries like Mao Zedong and Ho Chi Minh.

The book is comprised of 13 chapters.The thesis of Sun's work is one should employ an army after a thorough analysis mandated by careful planning and the formulation of an overall strategy before embarking on a campaign.Sun emphasizes rational self-control, influenced by Daoist teachings throughout the book.

Chap 1-Laying Plans
18. All warfare is based on deception. 19. Hence, when able to attack, we must seem unable; when using our forces, we must seem inactive; when we are near, we must make the enemy believe we are far away; when far away, we must make him believe we are near.

Chap 6-Weak Points And Strong
8. Hence that general is skillful in attack whose opponent does not know what to defend; and he is skillful in defense whose opponent does not know what to attack.

The best translation is the Samuel B. Griffith edition

5-0 out of 5 stars the art of war
another good book i invested in . such great work from Sun Tzu 10 stars bhahah ... Read more


9. The Art Of War: The Oldest Military Treatise In The World (1910)
by Sun Tzu
 Paperback: 262 Pages (2010-09-10)
list price: US$22.36 -- used & new: US$22.33
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1163900842
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
This scarce antiquarian book is a selection from Kessinger Publishing's Legacy Reprint Series. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment to protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature. Kessinger Publishing is the place to find hundreds of thousands of rare and hard-to-find books with something of interest for everyone! ... Read more

Customer Reviews (145)

4-0 out of 5 stars Good read
I really enjoyed reading this little book. It seems more like a manuscript than a real text book. Maybe that's how Sun Tzu intended the book to read like.

The only thing I did not like from this book is that there is no annotations whatsoever. Overall though it is a good read and I think it can help people in many situations in life (business, relationships, job, etc)

5-0 out of 5 stars The best book on strategy
The Art Of War is the best book of war strategy I have ever found. Each of the 13 Chapters describe one aspect of war strategy in a clear way. Even if this book as 2400 years, it is still even more relevant today as strategy it is applied to other sectors like business and sport (Sun Tzu For Success: How to Use the Art of War to Master Challenges and Accomplish the Important Goals in Your Life).
This very is a clear translation without any commentary. While commentaries help to explain the views of Sun Tzu, I prefer this version because it is so clear and easy to read.

3-0 out of 5 stars A little Klunky
The book is probably not as smoothly produced / edited as other versions of The Art of War.Compare the presentation of a couple of versions before settling on the one that suits you best.

5-0 out of 5 stars The Essence of Art of War
This edition is the stripped-down basics only.No commentary, no historical background, just the basic text of Sun Tzu's Art of War.I have a commentary version that is 4x thicker.Love this one for easy carrying and quick review.

3-0 out of 5 stars Management skills
The Art of war is an unique book which deals withmanagement skill development tools. The techniques explained in the book are universal and applicable in all times and situations.
... Read more


10. Sun Tzu For Success: How to Use the Art of War to Master Challenges and Accomplish the Important Goals in Your Life
by Gerald Michaelson, Steven Michaelson
Paperback: 224 Pages (2003-01-01)
list price: US$12.95 -- used & new: US$6.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1580627765
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
Following up on the bestselling success of Sun Tzu: The Art of War for Managers, expert author and coach Gerald Michaelson expands Sun Tzu’s ancient philosophy of warfare to personal development and success.

In setting forth his success strategies for leaders, Sun Tzu established The Art of War as the world’s first "self-help" book. Now the timeless text gets a modern interpretation for today’s world. Sun Tzu for Success enables you to develop a deeper understanding of yourself and others as a way to gain the upper hand in all activities in life.

Sun Tzu for Success helps you maximize your abilities in the following areas:

· Creativity

· Leadership

· Moral integrity

· Effective decision-making

· Implementing strategy

Sun Tzu for Success provides the foundation for greater self-knowledge. Let it be your action plan for accomplishment! ... Read more

Customer Reviews (14)

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Quality and excellent contents for daily use
The book arrived with a nice and secure postal package, I started reading it after I took the book out of the package, I loved the easy and simple language that author used to explain the principle excerted from the original "Art of War" context. Easy to follow paragraph.

4-0 out of 5 stars Sun Tzu
"It's essence be-aware of your environment and adapt to it with a sense of urgency if you want to succeed. Quite often little things make the difference. "

5-0 out of 5 stars the art of success
This book is extremely amazing. It transforms many lessons from "The Art of War" into strategies for your success. You'll definitely be wiser and have much motivation to succeed, and succeed NOW. It kinda makes me want to go start a business and get rich today, but I'll have to sleep on that. Very valuable book.

5-0 out of 5 stars Master of strategy
This book is a must for anyone who seriously wants to compete successfully an any aspect of business today.
I can be read again and again for review and enlightenment.

4-0 out of 5 stars A Good Book
This is a good book, but shouldn't be used as a substitute for reading The Art of War. I recommend reading both Sun Tzu For Success and The Art of War in order to get the most from Michaelson's book. This book takes The Art of War and makes it applicable to the business world and your personal life. It has a lot of practical insights and strategies for the average person that can improve your life. It is worth reading and I can see business people really enjoying what this book has to offer.

Bohdi Sanders, author of Warrior Wisdom: Ageless Wisdom for the Modern Warrior ... Read more


11. The Art of Warfare (Classics of Ancient China)
by Sun Tzu
Hardcover: 336 Pages (1993-03-02)
list price: US$27.95 -- used & new: US$12.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 034536239X
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
The most widely read military classic in human history, newly translated and revised in accordance with newly discovered materials of unprecedented historical significance. Fluid, crisp and rigorously faithful to the original, this new text is destined to stand as the definitive version of this cornerstone work of Classical Chinese. Of compelling importance not only to students of Chinese history and literature, but to all readers interested in the art or the philosophy of war.
... Read more

Customer Reviews (20)

5-0 out of 5 stars One of the most important military books in history
The Warring States period Warring States Period 475-221 BCE is a history of constant warfare, of alliances and counter-alliances, and of treaties made and broken.The nature of warfare evolved during the period.During the Warring States period, political stability was impossible to gain by adventurous military action.With the advent of swelling ranks of soldiers, protracted sieges, and an ever increasing drain on state treasuries, warfare became a serious matter for study.

Thus, the opening remark of "The Art Of War" states--without exaggeration--war had become the most serious business of the state, the key to survival or ruin. The author of this and other pithy aphorisms on how to successfully fight a war was Sun Tzu.Sun Tzu scholars place his writing "The Art of War" in the Warring States Period, based on the descriptions of warfare in the text. The book has received great exposure in the west starting in the eighteenth century after being translated by a French missionary.It has been reported that Napoleon studied the text and effectively put many of its teachings to good use.For the past 2,000 years, it has been the most important military treatise in all of Asia, even known by name with the common people.Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese military figures have studied it and employed its concepts to good effect.This is especially evident in the military tactics of 20th century revolutionaries like Mao Zedong and Ho Chi Minh.

The book is comprised of 13 chapters.The thesis of Sun's work is one should employ an army after a thorough analysis mandated by careful planning and the formulation of an overall strategy before embarking on a campaign.Sun emphasizes rational self-control, influenced by Daoist teachings throughout the book.

Chap 1-Laying Plans
18. All warfare is based on deception. 19. Hence, when able to attack, we must seem unable; when using our forces, we must seem inactive; when we are near, we must make the enemy believe we are far away; when far away, we must make him believe we are near.

Chap 6-Weak Points And Strong
8. Hence that general is skillful in attack whose opponent does not know what to defend; and he is skillful in defense whose opponent does not know what to attack.

The best translation is the Samuel B. Griffith edition

5-0 out of 5 stars excellent
i have this copy of the art of war and it is the best version i have owned of it (during my time in the marines one or two were lost along the way). i learn something new everytime i read it and i believe it applies to every aspect of life some form. i highly reccomend it.

5-0 out of 5 stars A great book
This is an inspirative book.Written by ancient chinesse philosopher during spring and autumn period but his theme is still relevant for our daily life.

5-0 out of 5 stars quality book
This is a great version of Sun Tzu's Art of War.The key items I wanted in this text were a quality translation of Sun Tzu's work in a hard bound book.This offering provides both.There are tons of versions of this work out there, so take a little time and search what's available.Everyone has a slightly different take on what they are looking for and because of the huge amount of offerings you can probably find a translation that matches what you are seeking.

1-0 out of 5 stars Misleading and Demeaning
According to Professor Ames, "From the perspective of the more rationalistic Western world view, the penalty the Chinese must pay for the absence of that underlying metaphysical infrastructure necessary to guarantee a single-order universe is what we take to be intelligibility and predictibility." (introduction, p.54)Considering that language depends on intelligibility and predictibility for its communicative function, one might wonder how Professor Ames then proposes to interpret and translate Chinese at all.
On examination, as might be expected from such an attitude, he does indeed make illogical misreadings of the text.These misinterpretations do reveal deficiencies, not in Chinese reasoning, but in the professor's own understanding of the nature of language, linguistics, and semantics in general; of literary Chinese grammar and vocabulary in particular; and of underlying principles and practical procedures of military science.
This, moreover, in spite of the fact that Sun Tzu's work is not really difficult and has already been translated into English many times.
Also, a comparison of East and West relevant to military science would logically treat the works of such Western writers on war as Machiavelli and Clausewitz.Military science is based on physical principles and psychological dynamics, not on metaphysical musings.The only use of metaphysics in war is in the context of psychological operations, that is on the cultural front of warfare, when a claim to exclusive possession of abstract truth is used tactically to incite violence by inflaming overbearing self-righteousness and antagonism toward others.
Professor Ame's unsubstantiated generalizations about Chinese and Western thought do nothing to advance an objective understanding of either, much less of Sun Tzu's work, but rather serve to project a demeaning image of China. ... Read more


12. Sun Tzu Strategies for Selling: How to Use The Art of War to Build Lifelong Customer Relationships
by Gerald Michaelson, Steven Michaelson
Paperback: 230 Pages (2003-10-20)
list price: US$10.95 -- used & new: US$2.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0071427309
Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
Winning sales tactics from the greatest strategist of all time

Through his bestselling books and popular seminars, Gerald Michaelson has established himself as the world's leading interpreter of Sun Tzu's timeless strategies for the modern business audience. In Sun Tzu Strategies for Selling, the author of the bestselling Sun Tzu: The Art of War for Managers interprets the theorist's classic battle strategies specifically to help salespeople win on the increasingly competitive sales battlefield.

Packed with brilliant insights that will help anyone who sells prevail over any competitor, this new translation of The Art of War includes special notations underscoring the relevance of Sun Tzu's writings to sales strategy. It also transforms Sun Tzu's wisdom into contemporary sales advice, object lessons, and real-life "how-tos," such as:

  • Get your strategy straight
  • Win without fighting
  • Have a unique selling proposition
  • Know your competitor
  • Aim for big wins
  • Learn from lost sales
... Read more

Customer Reviews (4)

1-0 out of 5 stars I can't believe this clown is still writing books
How do Michaelson's books keep getting 5 stars? Does he get all of his friends to rate his lame books as soon as he publishes them? This book was great the first time I read it -- when it was called "Sun Tzu for Business."

Please stop buying his books, so he'll go away.

Thanks.

2-0 out of 5 stars Just Another Run-of-the-Mill Sales Book Riding on the Sun Tzu Franchise
I read this book with high expectations that a lot of people equate business/ selling with warfare, and I'd like to see if someone can actually draw the correlation.

Unfortunately, while there are a lot of tips on selling, which could have been covered within Selling 101, there is minimal coverage on Sun Tzu's military strategies here.

The book cover also mentioned abt Customer Relationships, which is not substantially covered in the book as well.I guess by marketing it as what it's not, it's bad for customer relationsips too!

5-0 out of 5 stars You Must Try Out This Concept
I read about Gerald Michaelson's Sun Tzu in the review section of a local daily and I promptly ordered a copy.Reading it was a rich experience and the unique ways in which Gerald Michaelson has combined ideas from the West (which concentrates on the big battle as the way to win) and the East (which aims to win without fighting) is just brilliant.

I went a step ahead and took the book to a company meeting and read aloud a few excerpts, which I felt would be useful for my team. It was an interesting experience for all. The simplicity and various ways with which the concepts and wisdom of East and West can be combined to help you in achieving success, have been explained in a marvelous way. In fact, I have already used some of the sales tactics mentioned in the book.

I give 5 stars to Gerald Michaelson's Sun Tzu Strategies for Selling and recommend it as `A Must Read' for anyone involved with Selling.

5-0 out of 5 stars Sun Tzu: Strategies for Selling
Another delicious offerring from Gerald Michaelson. The East and the West has its own unique strenghs. In This book, Mr Michaelson integrates the eastern and westernwisdom into a synergistic strategic and tactical endeavours. In this fantastic book the twain have met.

Drawing on examples from today , and based on lessons from the past,this book belongs to every serious selling professionals. Read this book and you are closer to Tao: the effortless way, winning without fighting. ... Read more


13. The Art of War -- Spirituality for Conflict: Annotated & Explained
by Sun Tzu, Thomas Huynh
Paperback: 256 Pages (2008-04)
list price: US$16.99 -- used & new: US$10.54
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1594732442
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Product Description
Written 2,500 years ago by Chinese general Sun Tzu, The Art of War is a poetic and potent treatise on military strategy still in use in war colleges around the world. Yet its principles transcend warfare and have practical applications to all the conflicts and crises we face in our lives--in our workplaces, our families, even within ourselves.

Thomas Huynh guides you through Sun Tzu's masterwork, highlighting principles that encourage a perceptive and spiritual approach to conflict, enabling you to:

  • Prevent conflicts before they arise
  • Peacefully and quickly resolve conflicts when they do arise
  • Act with courage, intelligence and benevolence in adversarial situations
  • Convert potential enemies into friends
  • Control your emotions before they control you
Now you can experience the effectiveness of Sun Tzu's teachings even if you have no previous knowledge of The Art of War. Insightful yet unobtrusive facing-page commentary explains the subtleties of the text, allowing you to unlock the power of its teachings and help prevent and resolve the conflicts in your own life. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (10)

2-0 out of 5 stars The Kindle edition note order is totally garbled !
This is a good book. But it is all about annotations. This is a text followed by numbered annotated commentaries.
Alas, the kindle edition notes are ALL in the wrong place !! Not only in the wrong place but sometimes even in the wrong chapter!
It will take you a long process of going to and fro to read and make sense of this very good book.
Amazon, please re-edit. Till then buy the printed edition!

5-0 out of 5 stars Scholarly analysis as holograph

At the outset, I need to acknowledge that I am not fluent in even one Asian language and thus am wholly unqualified to express an opinion about the several translations of The Art of War. I have copies of Sun Tzu's classic work translated by Thomas Cleary and Samuel B. Griffith (among others), and have read commentaries on The Art of War by B. H. Liddell Hart, Mark McNeilly, and Gerald A. Michaelson who relied on these translations.

Initially I did not understand the reference to "spirituality" in this book's subtitle but as I read Thomas Huynh's Introduction, I realized that during my previous readings of The Art of War, I had misunderstood one of Sun Tzu's most important points: It is for reasons of compassion as well as practicality that every possible effort must be made to avoid combat. According to Huynh, "Sun Tzu's goal in writing The Art of War was not to glamorize warfare but to instruct military leaders in the best way to end an armed conflict as rapidly as possible or - even better - to prevent the outbreak of war in the first place. When Sun Tzu spoke of victory, this is what he meant - the prevention or quick resolution of conflict, not the conquering of your opponent." There is a scene near the conclusion of the film Fort Apache when Cochise tries and fails to negotiate an agreement with a U.S. Army lieutenant colonel. Soon afterward, the officer and most of his men die in combat. As the dust clears, Cochise reappears carrying the regiment's flag and angrily slams its stanchion into the ground with obvious disgust. Yes, the Apaches are the victors this day but their leader feels nothing but sadness and frustration as well as rage because the loss of life could have been avoided.

What sets this edition apart from others of which I am aware is the insightful Foreword by Marc Benioff and Preface by Thomas Cleary in combination with a well-crafted translation by Huynh and the editors of Sonshi.com. They are supplemented by Huynh's annotations juxtaposed with the key passages on which he comments. Readers will also appreciate the provision of brief explanations of core concepts that are inserted throughout the narrative. The title of my review suggests that Huynh and his Sonshi associates have -- with extensive scholarship, rigorous analysis, and lively eloquence -- created a three-dimensional context or frame-of-reference for Sun Tzu's observations and insights. To the extent that it is possible to do so with a literary work, they have brought it to life. That is indeed a brilliant achievement.

For example, consider this introductory comment to Doing Battle: "According to Sun Tzu, a skillful military general [or any military leader] only does battle when there is no other option. Many disagreements can be solved without the situation escalating into actual confrontation or battle, which often exacts a heavy toll on both sides." Huynh's 13 exceptionally informative annotations accompany the narrative in which Sun Tzu explains how best to pursue and achieve the eminently worthy objective of avoiding direct combat.

With regard to "Formation," [it] means more than simply the physical position you take to face your adversary; to Sun Tzu, it is the position of invincibility your enemy cannot surmount. This state of invincibility reduces the number of conflicts you will have to face, because adversaries will quickly see the futility of trying to challenge you." Huynh's 10 exceptionally informative annotations accompany the narrative in which Sun Tzu explains how best to pursue and achieve another eminently worthy objective, avoiding direct combat by convincing an opponent that there is no way he opponent can prevail. On the contrary, the opponent will be annihilated.

I am so impressed by the results of their collaboration that I not only recommend this edition to everyone who has not as yet read The Art of War but also to those who now have other editions because, in this non-scholar's opinion, it would be difficult to gain an understanding and appreciation of the material that would otherwise not be possible without the assistance of Thomas Huynh, Marc Benioff, Thomas Cleary, and their associates.

5-0 out of 5 stars Bravo Thomas Huynh
"Sun Tzu said: Warfare is a great matter of the nation; it is the ground of death and of life; it is the way of survival and of destruction, and must be examined." This is a quote from Thomas Huynh's "The Art of War -Spirituality for Conflict". Sun Tzu considered war to be a serious matter that should only be considered as a last resort. The Art of War advocates a virtue based leadership style and offers principles designed to help one find and take the path of least resistance towards morally audited goals.

Thomas Huynh's translation of this amazing classic appeals to both the beginner and seasoned reader. The sentiment behind Sun Tzu's tenants is preserved nicely in this translation. Mr. Huynh's explanations throughout are well articulated towards developing an overall better understanding of the text and how it is still relevant to the many facets of life today.

This is a must have translation in everyone's book collection, especial those students of the ancient Chinese military classics.

5-0 out of 5 stars Win Without Conflict
The reason for the Art of War derives from the understanding that conflict is an integral part of human life. Some circumstances allow us to avoid conflict, while at other times we are challenged to confront it directly. Sun Tzu teaches that making better decisions quickly, while under competitive pressure, is the means by which we conquer these challenges.

The conventional theory in competition, according to today's standards, is that success goes to the strongest or most aggressive. Sun Tzu's theory differs. Those who possess an in-depth understanding of the present situation, as well as alternatives to normal methods, win the day.

"Win all without fighting" is one of the pillars of the Art of War. Using strong positioning we are able to create problems for our opponent in a way that may cause him to refrain from entering into conflict at all. In the midst of battle, however, our strategy proffers foreknowledge about our adversary's potential plan which allows us to create a more than proportionate response to his attacks. In essence we are painting a picture where the risks far outweigh the gains, making it unreasonable for our opponent to continue in the fray.

Mr. Huynh articulates these principles in an original, cogent and lucid manner.The likes of which anyone at any age can easily understand."The Art of War, Spirituality for Conflict" is written so the tenets of this wisdom classic can be naturally implemented into one's everyday life.It is truly an outstanding interpretaion of the Art of War.

For those endeavoring to enrich your life with concepts deriving a true peace of mind, this book serves as a conduit to that end.

5-0 out of 5 stars From A Combat Leader
I first became aware of Sun Tzu and the Art of War in 1967 while I was in Infantry Officer Candidate School at Ft. Benning, Georgia. We didn't have time for an in depth study of the text but we were made familiar with some of the relevant chapters.

In 1969 I served as an infantry platoon leader in the Mekong Delta with the 9th Infantry Division. One of the lessons I learned as a small unit combat leader was how to use the terrain to your best advantage in a night ambush operation. After a time it becomes second nature. Sun Tzu wrote about this tactic centuries ago. And in war it is just as fresh and new as the sun rise; true in Iraq, true in Afghanistan.

My war experience was forty years ago and now as an old man I recently had the opportunity revisit the text. Thomas Huynh's translations and annotations of the text lead me to a greater understanding of the wisdom contain therein.

My 90 year mother-in-law saw me reading The Art of War and asked to borrow it when I had finished reading. I immediately gave her the book and told her I had finished it and was just rereading a chapter. I asked her to keep the book and not worry about returning it ever. I then ordered another copy for myself.

A couple of weeks later I asked her if she'd read any of the book and she replied that she had read several chapters and then added, "It's called The Art of War but it seems to me that it's more about resolving conflicts than engaging in them." I thought to myself, "She got it." And as a mother of sixteen children she has some experience in conflict resolution I would expect.

As a person who has seen war I can tell you that it is horrible and that it should be the absolute and final resort in conflict resolution. The greatest leader avoids conflict and peace and harmony is the greatest victory personally and universally.

I highly recommend this translation and annotation by Thomas Huynh. ... Read more


14. Sun Tzu For Execution: How to Use the Art of War to Get Results
by Steven W. Michaelson
Paperback: 224 Pages (2007-01-19)
list price: US$12.95 -- used & new: US$2.69
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1598690523
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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Following up on the bestselling success of Sun Tzu for Success, expert author Steven Michaelson expands Sun TzuÕs ancient philosophy of warfare to most popular topic in current business literatureÑexecution. While most other titles on Sun Tzu emphasize the strategic or philosophical nature of Sun TzuÕs writings, this guide shows you how to implement The Art of War tactically and operationally. Learn savvy strategic principles from Sun Tzu, such as:

  • Share rewards
  • Coordinate resources
  • Redouble your efforts
  • Choose your timing
  • Create alignment
Sun Tzu for Execution shows you how to achieve results and improve your bottom line. Filled with insight commentary and examples from companies that are best in class at execution, Sun Tzu for Execution makes strategy actionable. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (4)

4-0 out of 5 stars Great Correlation from Art of War to Application...
Having read Sun Tsu's "Art of War" numerous times... this translation was a little redundant...(first 1/2 of the book...) BUT... the second 1/2 of the book was "A very SOLID READ..."This is one of the best applications of the premises, ideas, strategy of Sun Tsu's classic work and ties them together into good leadership and business applications.This is a must read and must add to any leaders inventory of tools.

Dr. Faron Boreham

4-0 out of 5 stars A useful guide to applying The Art of War
Steven W. Michaelson has written an interesting but somewhat odd book. Its first section consists of a translation of Sun Tzu's classic Chinese text on military strategy, The Art of War. The second section, which takes up most of the volume, focuses on how to apply Sun Tzu's ideas to business. Nearly all the chapters open with a quotation from Sun Tzu, but Michaelson also refers to other military and business leaders. You could benefit from his comments on how to implement your business strategy without ever referring to the translation. That said, the principles Michaelson extracts are sound, and he shares with Sun Tzu the ability to provide clear, broad concepts to guide business strategists in a variety of situations. We recommend this book to executives who want to improve their ability to think strategically and who find it useful to boil down the process of strategizing to a few fundamental rules.

4-0 out of 5 stars Good, but Peters Out the Last 50 Pages or so
The first half of the book is great; the second half of the book begins to be repetitive, and by the time the last section is tackled ("Towering Strength"), it is weak...ironic, given that it's all about "execution."The book just sort of peters out....

5-0 out of 5 stars The Art of Correlation

This book consists of two parts: first, a complete translation of Sun Tzu's The Art of War by Pan Jiabin and Liu Ruixiang (from People's Republic of China); and then "The Art of Execution" in which Michaelson focuses on five"people management principles" of effective execution: Simplicity, Create Alignment, People Always, Flexibility, and Have Towering Strengths.Readers will especially Michaelson's skillful use of various devices which facilitate, indeed expedite a review of key points later. For example, an "In Summary" section at the conclusion of each chapter and the provision in all chapters of checklists, bullet points, and bold face. Michaelson's purpose is to provide what amounts to detailed annotations of his primary text, suggesting the relevance of Sun Tzu's admonitions to the 21st century business world.

Quite properly, he places greatest emphasis (as does Sun Tzu) on effective execution by whatever means necessary, preferably under most favorable conditions. In the Introduction, Michaelson shares an anecdote that reveals how Sun Tzu reputedly achieved specific objective. "The king gave Sun Tzu his 100 concubines and challenged him to apply his theories and practices of training soldiers to managing the concubines. The concubines, as you might expect, were untrained in the matters of marching and drills and performed poorly. Sun Tzu decided to try a more decisive tactic - he beheaded the king's favorite concubine. The rest of the concubines, realizing that Sun Tzu was, indeed, serious about having his directives carried out, immediately began to execute his orders exceedingly well."

Granted, this is a somewhat extreme example of "execution," especially given today's preoccupation with "empowering" employees, a term which - by the way - makes me feel as if my body were covered with caterpillars. However, Sun Tzu's action did achieve the desired objective. Credit Michaelson with providing a lively, thoughtful, and practical analysis of a classic source, The Art of War. ... Read more


15. From Sun Tzu to Xbox: War and Video Games
by Ed Halter
Paperback: 400 Pages (2006-05-10)
list price: US$16.95 -- used & new: US$39.63
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B000T9VOB6
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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Part of an industry that now earns more yearly than the Hollywood box office, video games have entered the forefront of the militarization of popular culture. How did this once-innocent pastime become a key player in America’s entry into global warfare? And is this blurring of reality changing the way we think about war?

Stretching from 3000 BC to today, this book investigates how military cultures and the evolution of games have been closely linked, from video gaming’s ancestors like chess and go, to the popularization of the 19th century Kriegspiel, to the development of computers for use during World War II and the invention of video games by Defense Department-funded scientists. Readers will discover how war fantasies played out from the early arcade years to the rise of online gaming, how the military began working with companies like Nintendo, Atari and Microsoft to produce training devices, and how today’s generals hope to sell recruitment to a new generation of joystick warriors. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (6)

3-0 out of 5 stars Ok
Had to read this for a class and it seemed pretty good until the end. It went from well researched to quoting posts from newgrounds. so 2/3 of the book it 4 star and 1/3 is 1 star.

5-0 out of 5 stars Engrossing, well-researched.
Mr. Halter's richly informative and highly entertaining exploration of the complex relationship between war and gaming technology sucks you in and doesn't let go until the very last page.War buffs and game enthusiasts alike will find themselves engrossed in this book, but even those of us who approach it with far more limited knowledge will be delighted by the journey into the workings of our own country's war machine.

4-0 out of 5 stars Interesting perspective on society and war
I picked up Halter's book almost by accident.Although I'm a military historian and wargamer I've never been interested in the video game genre. I was just about to put the book back on the shelf when I realized the book isn't really about video games per se but about how computer wargames have been shaped by war and how computer wargames fit into our culture.

Halter argues that from the beginning of the computer age, when primarily military money was used to fund computer research and development, to the present there has been an almost symbiotic relationship between computer games and war.One, in turn, fed the other as experience in war led to more realistic computer games which allowed computer wargames (or simulations, if you prefer) to increase the realism of training.At the same time the knowledge created by the military-industrial complex (to which Halter adds academia) spilled into the entertainment industry.This in turn developed more realistic animation and interactive capabilities that went back into the military's training simulation programs.

The book is easy to read, as you'd expect from a journalist, and certainly causes you to think a bit differently about the development of the computer and the entertainment industry as it relates to wargames.The only (small) issues I had was that its focus on the military aspect of computer R&D does not allow a consideration of NASA's impact on computer development.The other issue was that, as a journalist and not an academic, it is not well foot-noted or sourced so you can't go to the sources to verify or validate the information he uses to support his argument.

Having said that, Halter certainly presents an interesting and thought-provoking argument and commentary on the relationship between society and the military as it's connected via computer wargames.I wouldn't want to use it as a source for an academic paper, but it certainly presents a thesis that makes for interesting reading.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Book about a subject that had to be written about
As a professional in the Modeling and Simulation field I see this book as a great analysis of the mistaken belief that because you can play video games you can fight a war and take on complex social problems.Video games are made for entertainment to satisfy the need for humans to play.If you put the psychology of real human beings into video games, you will not have fun game. Mr. Halter's book give great insight into the problems that have to be overcome to create a "realistic" environment for the training of future soldiers, and what we have so far are not even close.The day we can have a kid walk from the video arcade to a M1 Abrams tank and fight effectively we will have reached our goal. . .but, is that where we want to be?

5-0 out of 5 stars An eye-opening history
This is a clear-headed and fascinating account of the many complex links between war and video games, some of which I knew something about (America's Army for example) and others I'd never heard about (like the Institute for Creative Technology at the USC, where the Army develops videogames for training). Halter approaches the subject matter with a wry but even-handed manner, and he makes clear that he's an avid game player himself, unlike many political journalists who have taken on similar subjects. He begins in ancient civilizations, runs us through the ways games were used in Victorian times for strategy, and reveals how military needs funded the early hacker culture where video games were invented. About half the book is about the post-9/11 era, however, and the part I knew least about is his final chapter dealing with games about war made by activists and artists. All in all it is a thoroughly entertaining read, and a sharp analysis of the way in which the experience of real war and conflict have seeped into our popular culture for reasons that aren't always obvious. ... Read more


16. Sun Tzu and the Art of Business: Six Strategic Principles for Managers
by Mark R. McNeilly
Paperback: 272 Pages (2000-04-13)
list price: US$19.95 -- used & new: US$11.20
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0195137892
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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More than two millennia ago the famous Chinese general Sun Tzu wrote the classic work on military strategy, The Art of War. Now, in Sun Tzu and the Art of Business, Mark R. McNeilly shows how Sun Tzu's strategic principles can be successfully applied to modern business situations. Here are really two books in one: McNeilly's synthesis of Sun Tzu's ideas into six strategic principles for the business executive, plus the entire text of Samuel B. Griffith's popular translation of The Art of War. Within, McNeilly explains how to gain market share without inciting competitive retaliation, how to attack a competitor's weak points, and how to maximize the power of market information for competitive advantage. He also demonstrates the value of speed, preparation, and secrecy in throwing the competition off-balance, employing strategy to beat the competition, and the need for character in successful leaders. In his final chapter, McNeilly presents a practical method to put Sun Tzu and The Art of Business into practice. By using modern examples throughout the book from GE, Microsoft, AT&T, BMW, Southwest Airlines, FedEx, and many others, he illustrates how, by following the wisdom of history's most respected strategist, executives can avoid the pitfalls of management fads and achieve lasting competitive advantage. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (16)

3-0 out of 5 stars Good Start to Apply Sun Tzu to Marketing
McNeilly was the first work I read applying Sun Tzu to modern business.Although I was initially impressed with the translation of theory, I was very disappointed with lack of in-depth discussion beyond almost "common sense" applications and few business examples.But, it is a fairly easy and quick read...a good starting point in getting the "Art of War" into your business strategies.

McNeilly does well jumping between Sun Tzu's original translated text and then applying that verse to his supporting points.There is a bit more military examples than there are business examples, which has been a little disappointing.But, the corporate world examples that are provided are good ones.

"Art of Business" does well to explain the finer points of Sun Tzu's timeless strategic tome and gets you started in the right direction.

5-0 out of 5 stars ...the soldier, being much too wise, Strategy was his strength...
I was fortunate to hear the author of this excellent book speak to a meeting in Raleigh, NC a few months ago and his inspired yet entertaining talk motivated me to go out and purchase this book.

It seems to me that this book is one of a select few which form a theme, the best exemplar of which, IMHO, is the Living CompanyThe Living Company. At the heart of this theme is the notion that long term success for businesses does not come from short term measures aimed at profit maximisation through minimising costs and selling at the highest possible price in the marketplace. While such tactics predominate in many areas of the American economy where corporate power and marketing have limited consumer choice to poor products sold at a high price providing high salaries and big bonuses for top executives for a relatively short period of time before they have succumbed to the storms unleashed through globalisation and domestic monetary and banking policies.

Instead, the approach on offer here is based on sound principles rather than get rich schemes favoured by Madoff and his Ponzi accolytes, or the latest management fads which generate short-term results before being shown to be the fakes that they are.The principles ennuciated within are based on Sun Tzu's Art of War, which is a collection of anecdotes, and pointers to miltary success. The author relates the principles therein to buinesses and provides contemporary case-study examples to support his thesis. In doing so he points the way to a different type of business enterprise to the command and control, micromanaging, CYA type which has been so common in America but, truth be told, is to be found wanting in the new global competitve markets.

What is being advocated is the type of networked business model which has proved to be so successful elsewhere, surviving the squalls which have beset the world economy in recent years. The trouble is that a transition to these types of business will come at a heavy price for those who have managed to become very wealthy through the short-termist type of tactics that have predominated in the past. Perhaps the current depression will prove to be the fulcrum which tips the scales in favour of the new type of business which is promoted in this book.

Change management is often advocated by those who are most resistant to change themselves, often in challenged companies who are fighting for their very existance. Executives should take the opportunity to establish long term strategies for the future and go on to build a better mousetrap or whatever and set about winning the war which is going on on a global scale and not just in America. This is just the book to help them.

5-0 out of 5 stars Practical application of a classic book on strategy
McNeilly's book is a terrific introduction on how to apply the principles taught by this classic book on strategy.

As a marketing representative for my company, I use these principles everyday, in order to win business, and frustrate my competitors.

I always recommend McNeilly's books as a starting point to anyone wanting to learn about strategy.

5-0 out of 5 stars Pragmatic Look @ Sunzi's (Sun Tzu) Principles of Strategy.
Mr. McNeilly book on Sunzi (Sun Tzu)is one of my favorite books on practical strategic application. ...

As a sftwr developer-prjct mgmt consultant, found his ["Six Strategic Principles"] to be pragmatically effective in any strategic challenges. ...

Also, technically abstract enough where the reader(-implementer of the ["Six Strategic Principles"]) can devise their own spin to their own strategic challenges. ...

The examples that are introduced were efficient enough for me to understand. ...

Have successfully utilized [McNeilly's Six Principles] for different strategic scenarios (i.e., market research, product development, close quarters negotiation, etc.).

McNeilly's book is one of those few books that's worth re-reading once a year for a mental refresher course. ... (Yes! This Cardinal does re-read this book once per yr.)

Have recommend this book to my assoc(s). Also, given away many copies of this book to those who are interested in Sunzi Strategic Principles.

Overall, I find his writing to be extremely sharp; his ability to explain how to apply Sunzi (Sun Tzu) principles to military conflict and business is nothing short of extraordinary.

Recommend this book to anyone who is serious about strategy.

3-0 out of 5 stars Entertaining read, but unsatisfying
This book doesn't seem to be too detailed in it's examples and explanations. The basic principles are given, but there is not enough about the actual successful applications of these principles. I felt frustrated throughout the book when he would continually make references to a brief overview of a military event to prove his point or when he mentions "a well known company." The "well known companies," he would use these as support for his arguments/theories on how to apply them in business. He would say how the companies did this and that, and brought about certain results. I was left so frustrated because I wanted DETAILS! I wanted to know who these companies were and see for myself what happened and what significance it had to the company. Sadly, he hardly gives you any of this.
You are better off reading books written by Executives(active or retired). They will give you a perspective that is more pragmatic and more 'ordinary' if you will. And don't make shortcuts, actually read 'The Art of War' if you care about this topic. ... Read more


17. The Art of War
by Sun Tzu
Mass Market Paperback: 224 Pages (2005-01-11)
list price: US$7.99 -- used & new: US$3.71
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1590302257
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Product Description
Conflict is an inevitable part of life, according to this ancient Chinese classic of strategy, but everything necessary to deal with conflict wisely, honorably, victoriously, is already present within us. Compiled more than two thousand years ago by a mysterious warrior-philosopher,The Art of War is still perhaps the most prestigious and influential book of strategy in the world, as eagerly studied in Asia by modern politicians and executives as it has been by military leaders since ancient times. As a study of the anatomy of organizations in conflict,The Art of War applies to competition and conflict in general, on every level from the interpersonal to the international. Its aim is invincibility, victory without battle, and unassailable strength through understanding the physics, politics, and psychology of conflict.Amazon.com Review
The Art of War is the Swiss army knife of militarytheory--pop out a different tool for any situation.Folded into thissmall package are compact views on resourcefulness, momentum, cunning,the profit motive, flexibility, integrity, secrecy, speed,positioning, surprise, deception, manipulation, responsibility, andpracticality.Thomas Cleary's translation keeps the package tight,with crisp language and short sections. Commentaries from the Chinesetradition trail Sun-tzu's words, elaborating and picking up onpuzzling lines. Take the solitary passage: "Do not eat food for theirsoldiers."Elsewhere, Sun-tzu has told us to plunder the enemy'sstores, but now we're not supposed to eat the food?The Tang dynastycommentator Du Mu solves the puzzle nicely, "If the enemy suddenlyabandons their food supplies, they should be tested first beforeeating, lest they be poisoned." Most passages, however, are thepinnacle of succinct clarity: "Lure them in with the prospect of gain,take them by confusion" or "Invincibility is in oneself, vulnerabilityis in the opponent." Sun-tzu's maxims are widely applicable beyond themilitary because they speak directly to the exigencies ofsurvival. Your new tools will serve you well, but don't flauntthem. Remember Sun-tzu's advice: "Though effective, appear to beineffective." --Brian Bruya ... Read more

Customer Reviews (94)

3-0 out of 5 stars long introduction
The book is very interesting but I thought the translator's introduction was too long (more than a quarter of the whole book).

5-0 out of 5 stars Good!
The translation is nice, not much lost in the translation.

The condition of the book is great and fast shipping.

5-0 out of 5 stars If you know both yourself and the danger you face, you can win many contests without a single loss---Sun Tzu
Named for the mythical (?) and mystical kingdom in the East, Shambhala Publications is known for bringing some of the greatest and sometimes most obscure philosophical writings of Mankind to the attention of the general public. Heavily (though not exclusively) concerned with Buddhist and Taoist thought, Shambhala Pocket Classics are an attractive set of unabridged minibooks which fit comfortably in a shirt pocket, making them perfect for reading on planes, trains, and automobiles. Titles in the set include THE BOOK OF TEA, WAY OF THE JEWISH MYSTICS, ZEN FLESH, ZEN BONES, THE TIBETAN BOOK OF THE DEAD, TAO TE CHING, POEMS BY EMILY DICKINSON, THE ART OF PEACE, and this volume by Sun Tzu, THE ART OF WAR.

Written around 600 BC in a war-ravaged China, Sun Tzu's brief classic addresses (in 13 brief chapters) each aspect of the art of war. This text is considered seminal and indispensable even today in military education. It is said (with justification proven over time) that a commander who follows Sun Tzu's dictates cannot be defeated, and every military defeat can be analyzed in terms of its failure to heed these dictates.

These dictates are truly universal, and can be applied to social situations and business. There is a moderately long list of titles applying THE ART OF WAR to almost every human endeavor including dating, contract negotiation and business, real estate sales, and even cooking. just to name a few. The popularity of THE ART OF WAR as The Nasty Man's Bible of Social Dominance amongst the shark-eating human population has obscured Sun Tzu's primary thesis:That the well-disposed leader need not engage in war at all to achieve his desired ends.

5-0 out of 5 stars Must have book
James Clavell edition is really good as compared to original book. I have read the book couple of times but was not able to understand that unless or until i read James Calvell edition.
I will recommend it to everyone.

5-0 out of 5 stars Extremely Happy with Purchase
I received Thomas Cleary's translation of Sun Tzu's "Art of War" in a trouble free, very timely fashion, for a great price.When it arrived, I found the book in excellent condition, which is good as I bought the book brand new.Overall, I couldn't be happier with the purchase. ... Read more


18. Sun Tzu: The Art of War for Managers; 50 Strategic Rules
by Sun-tzu, Gerald A. Michaelson
Paperback: 224 Pages (2001-01-01)
list price: US$12.95 -- used & new: US$7.12
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B002ZNJX76
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
Organized around 50 rules for strategic thinking, The Art of War for Managers translates the strategic wisdom of Sun Tzu into powerful 10-minute lessons to enhance your business and personal success.

"Michaelson is Sun Tzu's foremost student and interpreter. He brings home the business relevance of this ancient military strategist in down-to-earth language." Al Vogl, editor of The Conference Board Magazine

"Brilliant work! The useful commentary in The Art of War for Managers brings Sun Tzu's timeless wisdom to a new level." Gen. Bill Creech, Author, The Five Pillars of TQM ... Read more

Customer Reviews (39)

4-0 out of 5 stars Simple yet Comprehensive Translation into Modern Management
Michaelson, who has also written a few other books related to Sun Tzu's ancient text, takes a very usable approach in the "Art of War for Managers".It is very well thought out and has numerous instantly recognizable examples in the modern context.The language is easy to follow and direct quotes from the original Sun Tzu often have several different translations provided for better understanding.

The 50 Strategic Rules are divided up following the 13 chapters of the original "Art of War".Each Rule is a 5-10 minute read, so it's very easy to pick-up from your last read after having the book placed to the side for a while.Although, it is important to note that each Rule is not very in-depth, I believe it was meant to provide quick and simple insights.Each Rule includes a quoted Sun Tzu text, usually a helpful quote from a famous leader, then a well written manager's commentary to describe and support.The easy accessibility to these quick lessons are extremely useful when looking for inspiring ideas while making important business decisions.

Part Two of this book includes a very useful "Practical Applications" chapter.While not completely practical, the concepts are generally well accepted and do inspire ideas that are very practical. Having specific examples of modern business implementation is where many "Art of War" writers usually fail.To see this added section affirms that Michaelson thought his book out to tactical ends.

I've read many attempts at the "Art of War" and Michaelson's books are easily on the top of that pile.Although I do see duplication in his newer work "Sun Tzu - Strategies for Marketing", the layout for "Art of War for Managers" has made it more useful to me.It has benefitted me to have read both.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great book that enlighten management thinking
Sun Tzu`s The Art of War is a great book and is still the most important work on the subject of strategy today. It`s principles are timeless, and applicable to situations that requires absolute victory. The book shows the features that a great leader should possess to achieve intended goal.
The Art of War by Sun Tzu gives instructions on waging a successful war. One of the main themes in this book is using strategy in facing conflict. Military commanders know how important planning and executions to winning a battle, not to mention a war. Sun Tzu explained strategy in his book. He states: The general who wins a battle makes many calculations in his temple before the battle is fought. Sun Tzu realized that to conquer the enemy, one must be fully prepared and consider all actions and consequences before going into battle. When speaking of tactics, Sun Tzu wrote: He wins his battles by making no mistakes. Making no mistakes is what establishes the certainty of victory, for it means conquering an enemy that is already defeated. So if the commander is thoroughly able to carry out his plans, he will have beaten the enemy before stepping onto the battlefield. Sun Tzu argued that success was in the hands of the commander since, "the consummate leader cultivates the Moral Law and strictly adheres to method and discipline; thus it is in his power to control success.
For example, The first chapter deals with the five advantages of strategy: moral influence, weather, terrain, command, and doctrine .Sun Tzu goes on to explain how deception is always present in war, and gives good example categories of deception.
Chapter two talks about waging war. Sun Tzu said: When you engage in actual fighting, if victory is long in coming, then men's weapon will grow dull and their ardor will be damped. If you lay siege to a town, you will exhaust your strength. It teaches us patience and having the right timing. Having the right timing is also very important. It is linked to planning. It must be always your objective to attain success ore victory.
Chapter three of Offensive Strategy touches on the strategy of winning the war without having to fight. When engaging with the enemy, the overall best strategy is to "know your enemy and know yourself". (This strategy is also one of my life mottos). Sun Tzu also gives fives elements in predicting a victory; knowing when to fight, knowing when to use small or large forces, ensuring that your ranks are unified, being careful when your enemy is not, and letting the generals fight the war, etc.
I found that I was able to use some of Sun Tzu's lessons in my daily life and internship in the marketing department at Collexis The first lesson that sticks out in my mind is when he said: "Security against defeat implies defensive tactics; ability to defeat the enemy means taking the offensive." Therefore, I tried my best to taking the initiative in any situation that I could. Another lesson I learned was "Ponder and deliberate before you make a move." This lesson is a key one and can be applied to all facets of life. Too often decisions are made before planning and constructive thought processes can take place. I realized that it is much more important to take some time to make a decision based on thought and logic rather than make a hasty decision which will have negative consequences in the long run.

4-0 out of 5 stars The Art of War for Managers: Great! Full of wise tips for future managers
Short, concise and straight to the point, this book is exactly what I would expect for strategic lessons to be a successful manager. The author has the ability to incorporate current business issues and successes and make them relatable to Sun Tzu's principles.

In general, I have been a bit disappointed in literatures for managers, yet The Art of War for Managers brings me a new inspiration. The author is able to integrate great sayings that are very appropriate to the situation discussed. Sun Tzu provides us with wise advices such as "Fight only battles you can win". This book brings a new perspective of the strategic literature. Sun Tzu's principles are timeless; they could be applied thousand years ago and have still application in today's businesses. While at a first look to the book, one can expect to use literally military tactics to business; it is not exactly true. Sun Tzu actually gives us advice on how to organize our strategy so that we do not have to fight. I never realized how military tactics could be so much related to business strategies. The managers' examples placed at the end of the book are very interesting. It actually shows that applying Sun Tzu's principles is working and that business managers using them are now successful companies and were pleased with the guidance of the fifty strategic rules for managers.

The Art of war for managers would be tremendously beneficial for recently graduated students as it will help them see the big picture and associate known principles to real world settings. I am really impressed the immense level of wisdom of Sun Tzu. Michaelson's writing style makes the book very easy to read. I enjoy the structure of the book; each chapter consist of a passage of Tzu's The Art of War, a translation done by several translators and a manager's commentary in which the author match Tzu's principles to successful firms that are using these concepts. Although several of these rules are common knowledge, many times managers are overlooking these rules and make highly costly mistakes for their businesses.

One negative that I regret about The Art of War for Managers is the redundancy of certain elements of strategic rules. The subject of leadership is viewed and reviewed throughout the book. By the end, it makes this subject a bit monotonous. Another drawback for me is that I feel that Michaelson sometimes is drawing parallels very easily and I am not sure that some of Tzu's principles can be applied to business settings so simply. Also using deception as a useful tactic in competition goes against my ethical values. I do not think that encouraging employees to spy on the competition is morally right. I would recommend people to read the original The Art of War of Sun Tzu and then make their own application to their business issues and solutions. Overall even though I feel that there are some drawbacks, these powerful ten-minute lessons will help anyone looking for personal enrichment as well as business success.

4-0 out of 5 stars Sun Tzu in the Consumer Packaged Goods Environment
Tactics and strategies do not need to be new but a reminder or refresher.How an individual understands and uses these tactics again or differently is the beauty of Sun Tzu. Each chapter of the book acknowledged a unique and simple way to handle various business situations from planning, maneuvering, using teamwork as well as truly understanding your competition. Through such knowledge, businesses can avoid wasting time and energy by planning the right strategy.

Sun Tzu is based on military organization and not all can be combined to business.Sun Tzu believes, "the way to avoid what is strong is to attack what is weak. Look for lightly defended positions."This may not always be the case as some potentially weaker products may not be performing in the consumer packaged goods market like a larger brand but they could be fulfilling a niche or paying the retailer to be on the shelf.No matter how much their sales are lackluster, they may not only have the unique niche market your product may not satisfy, they are also helping the retailer achieve his balance sheet goals. Secondly, I disagree from an ethics standpoint that price deception is a useful tactic in negotiations.There are laws in the consumer packaged goods marketplace against price collusion with competitors and employees can quickly lose their jobs and careers if caught in violation.
Businesses must continue to gain share and strength by understanding the marketplace and being on the pulse of change through innovation and education of its products.Sun Tzu reminds us how to do this. It is integral to be flexible with the unsteady economic and recessionary times. The world is in trying times and as a manager I must continue to study competition and be ready to change my tactics at a moments notice.As Sun Tzu reminds us, there needs to be an evolution of growth using teamwork, strategizing battlegrounds and understanding the wants and needs of consumers to gain an advantage over the competition.

3-0 out of 5 stars Don't forget the enemy within
Art of War is a treatise on military strategy written in 5th or 6th BC; Sun Tzu formulated these rules based on the context at that time and the work is still relevant because the dynamics of human interaction still pretty much remains the same. This book is an attempt to cast Sun Tzu's rules of warfare in the context of present day business and it presents these rules in the form of easily consumable capsules (but does that help?). There probably isn't anything new here that you are not already aware of; if you have already been in battles you would/should be aware of the importance of many of the points mentioned here. However, the fact that a famous ancient treatise identifies and attaches importance to many of the points that you observed during your school of hard knocks validates your observations and indicates the timelessness of those ideas. Also, present day business needn't be conducted with an emphasis on combativeness; the enemy is often not your competitor, but your inability to innovate and deliver value, i.e. the enemy lies within you. ... Read more


19. Sun Tzu Was a Sissy: Conquer Your Enemies, Promote Your Friends, and Wage the Real Art of War
by Stanley Bing
Paperback: 240 Pages (2006-04-01)
list price: US$14.95 -- used & new: US$3.90
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0060734787
Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars
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We live in a vicious, highly competitive workplace environment, and things aren't getting any better. Jobs are few and far between, and people aren't any nicer now than they were when Ghengis Khan ran around in big furs killing people in unfriendly acquisitions. For thousands of years, people have been reading the writings of the deeply wise, but also extremely dead Chinese philosopher Sun Tzu, who was perhaps the first to look on the waging of war as a strategic art that could be taught to people who wished to be warlords and other kinds of senior managers.

In a nutshell, Sun Tzu taught that readiness is all, that knowledge of oneself and the enemy was the foundation of strength and that those who fight best are those who are prepared and wise enough not to fight at all. Unfortunately, in the current day, this approach is pretty much horse hockey, a fact that has not been recognized by the bloated, tree-hugging Sun Tzu industry, which churns out mushy-gushy pseudo-philosophy for business school types who want to make war and keep their hands clean.

Sun Tzu was a Sissy will transcend all those efforts and teach the reader how to make war, win and enjoy the plunder in the real world, where those who do not kick, gouge and grab are left behind at the table to pay the tab. Students of Bing will be taught how to plan and execute battles that hurt other people a lot, and advance their flags and those of their friends, if possible. All military strategies will be explored, from mustering, equipping, organizing, plotting, scheming, rampaging, squashing and reaping spoils.

Every other book on the Art of War bows low to Sun Tzu. We're going to tell him to get lost and inform our readers how real war is currently conducted on the battlefield of life.

... Read more

Customer Reviews (26)

5-0 out of 5 stars Corporate Politics is War!
This book is very enlightening and cool.Stanley Bing says it like it is.If you wait long enough your enemies will float down river!

1-0 out of 5 stars National Bestseller?Whom did he pay to get that on the cover?
I'm sorely disappointed in this book.I picked it up, read the cover, a little bit of the first chapter and thought it might be funny and entertaining.Completely boring and not funny at all.He uses numerous charts and graphs to try to make his points.Trouble is, there are no points and the charts and graphs are little more than senseless graphics.Don't waste your time and money.If you can find it for a .10 and you have time to waste, OK.How does garbage like this get published?

1-0 out of 5 stars Obnoxious
How anybody could actually finish reading this book is beyond me.No valid insights whatsoever.

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent service despite unfortunate circumstances
My order failed to reach me in a timely manner, neither through the fault of the merchant nor I.However, as soon as I contacted them about my issue, they promptly emailed me back and the book was in my hands 3 days later!Would highly recommend!Cheers.

4-0 out of 5 stars You need Yinyang.You need Bing.
I think the one-star reviewers are missing the joke here.For those of us who read the back page of Fortune first, Gil Schwartz's Stanley Bing is the thing.His irreverent brand of humor is always spot on.His writing is crisp and well-constructed (you expected anything less from CBS' Head of PR?).His humor is biting, yet very smart, witty and delightfully unexpected.

Here's one example of many from the book - one of Bing's stock-in-trade tricks are his faux charts and tables.In one table, he reviews Warriors and their Actions.The table starts off like this:

Warrior - Action
------------------------
Moses - Parted Red Sea, made flood

Pharaoh - Drove into the flood

Howell Raines - Flooded the Zone

That's just a wonderfully witty free-association getting from Moses to Howell Raines.The book is filled with brilliant set pieces like that.If you love the Bing columns, you'll love the book.Think of them as extended columns.Bing fans are legion.His books deliver the goods. ... Read more


20. The Art of War: An Illustrated Edition
by Sun Tzu
Paperback: 224 Pages (2004-10-19)
list price: US$24.95 -- used & new: US$14.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1590301854
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Product Description
Compiled more than two thousand years ago by a mysterious warrior-philosopher,The Art of War is still perhaps the most prestigious and influential book of strategy in the world today, as eagerly studied by modern politicians and executives as it has been by military leaders since ancient times. As a study of the anatomy of organizations in conflict,The Art of War applies to competition and conflict in general, on every level from the interpersonal to the international. Its aim is invincibility, victory without battle, and unassailable strength through understanding of the physics, politics, and psychology of conflict.

This illustrated edition includes some of the finest works of art from China, Japan, and Korea, selected from museums, galleries, and private collections in countries throughout the world, deepening the reader's appreciation of the teachings ofThe Art of War. Amazon.com Review
Sun Tzu's Art of Warjust got better. The Illustrated Art of War enlivens ThomasCleary's complete translation, including commentaries, with full-colorreproductions of paintings and statuary from China and Japan. Talkabout martial art--these depictions show full battles scenes, theChinese god of war, weaponry, processions--even an ancient map.--Brian Bruya ... Read more

Customer Reviews (12)

5-0 out of 5 stars Well Annotated
This beautifully illustrated edition provides parallel quotations from other great works of Zen philosophy and geo-political thought.The parallel quotations clarify Master Sun's work and enhance the reader's understanding and appreciation.A complementary "must have" for students of Master Sun.

5-0 out of 5 stars Thomas Cleary Does It Again!
It's to bad President Bush, Vice President Cheney, andSecretary of Defense Rumsfeld didn't read this book. As I was reading it I noticed that frequently (*very* frequently, unfortunately) they did the exact opposite of what Sun Tzu would have advised.

For one thing, Sun Tzu advised against fighting large-scale and protracted wars a long way from home, because the costs of *everything* increase. One's opponent can then use this against you by finding ways to drag out the war, ruin your economy, and by ruining your economy ruin your war effort.

Jiu Jitsu is the Japanese art of using an attacker's energy against him rather than directly opposing it. A comparison could be made between bin Laden having to spend only a million or so dollars to blow up the World Trade Center, when estimates of the cost of the Iraq war are about 9 billion per month.

That's almost a million times more costly, EACH AND EVERY MONTH! That means that for every dollar bin Laden spent, we spend a million just in one month. The war will be seven years long in March. Multiply that by 12 and you get 84 months; then, let'ssay the war lasts another 16 months beyond that; it will mean that bin Laden spent about a penny for each million dollars we spent.

That's the very essence of Sun Tzu. Even Sun Tzu probably couldn't have imagined odds like that. If there was a Sun Tzu award, bin Laden would certainly be a good candidate for it.

Don't get me wrong. He's one of the most heartless bastards who has ever walked the earth, but he's a smart, heartless bastard, at least when it comes to waging war on the cheap. I doubt even in his wildest dreams he ever imagined he could have exhausted the American war machine so effectively. And like the Energizer Bunny, the costs and the war keep going and going and going . . . with no end in sight.

An equally good metaphor for how bin Laden tricked us is found in the story of the Tar Baby. Brer Rabbit tricks Brer Fox into punching and kicking the Tar Baby until his arms and legs are buried deep in tar and he's stuck. Now we're stuck in Iraq.

Bin Laden tempted the U.S. to come after him with overwhelming force, and we took the bait. Sun Tzu would have probably advised retaliation that was lower key and sneaky but which would have the desired effect, not involving the high risk of betting our entire economy on the outcome---especially since the war front was so far from the U.S. He would have advised patience and cunning over an impulsively and hastily conceived large-scale counterattack.

Either way, if the U.S. hadn't started the second war in Iraq, we would have probably fared much better in the long run. Iraq was a bridge too far. And now the expense is killing us. I know The Art of War is read by Western military strategists. I'd think it would be required reading at Westpoint. Nowman Schwatrzkopf certainly seems to have read it.

After reading the Art of War, it's clear to me that the second Iraq War was a train wreck waiting to happen. Our country is collapsing under the weight of the astronomical costs of supporting such an enormous military undertaking so far from home, with no end in sight.

The insurgents also act in ways that Sun Tzu would have recommended: harrying the opponent and keeping massive numbers of troops committed over a long period of time, wearing them and U.S. down gradually.

The Iraqi insurgents have us in a war of attrition a long way from home, where their costs are low and ours are astronomical. Not an enviable position for a commander to be in.

5-0 out of 5 stars One of the most important military books in history
The Warring States period Warring States Period 475-221 BCE is a history of constant warfare, of alliances and counter-alliances, and of treaties made and broken.The nature of warfare evolved during the period.During the Warring States period, political stability was impossible to gain by adventurous military action.With the advent of swelling ranks of soldiers, protracted sieges, and an ever increasing drain on state treasuries, warfare became a serious matter for study.

Thus, the opening remark of "The Art Of War" states--without exaggeration--war had become the most serious business of the state, the key to survival or ruin. The author of this and other pithy aphorisms on how to successfully fight a war was Sun Tzu.Sun Tzu scholars place his writing "The Art of War" in the Warring States Period, based on the descriptions of warfare in the text. The book has received great exposure in the west starting in the eighteenth century after being translated by a French missionary.It has been reported that Napoleon studied the text and effectively put many of its teachings to good use.For the past 2,000 years, it has been the most important military treatise in all of Asia, even known by name with the common people.Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese military figures have studied it and employed its concepts to good effect.This is especially evident in the military tactics of 20th century revolutionaries like Mao Zedong and Ho Chi Minh.

The book is comprised of 13 chapters.The thesis of Sun's work is one should employ an army after a thorough analysis mandated by careful planning and the formulation of an overall strategy before embarking on a campaign.Sun emphasizes rational self-control, influenced by Daoist teachings throughout the book.

Chap 1-Laying Plans
18. All warfare is based on deception. 19. Hence, when able to attack, we must seem unable; when using our forces, we must seem inactive; when we are near, we must make the enemy believe we are far away; when far away, we must make him believe we are near.

Chap 6-Weak Points And Strong
8. Hence that general is skillful in attack whose opponent does not know what to defend; and he is skillful in defense whose opponent does not know what to attack.

The best translation is the Samuel B. Griffith edition

5-0 out of 5 stars The Talmudic version of the Art of War
With its clear graphics and its wonderful illustrations, this version of the Art of War adds the element of the various interpretations of the text, set up much in the way that the classic Talmudic texts read.An important work in the history of military strategy and philosophy, this book has much to teach to anyone.

5-0 out of 5 stars Art with Director's Commentary
I cannot rave enough about this book. As I'm sure most translators or more authoritative people will point out, the translation quality here is superb. But, from the angle of the guy who knows almost zilch about that, the book offers guidance and discipline. While the original is short and to the point, this book offers a more 'warm' (if I can call it that) feeling, with photographic, smooth paper and various related pictures from the time.

That being said, this book also features commentary by other guys from the time relating to their opinions of Sun Tzu's words. It's definitely interesting to get perspectives from them and not just the author or translator. I felt that was a unique addition that really added to the book. You can read the whole thing of Sun Tzu's words in a couple days or so, but the deep discussion behind it offers a whole 'nother book in and of itself. ... Read more


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