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$11.97
1. Complete Works of Tacitus
$20.99
2. The Germania & Agricola of
$9.99
3. Tacitus on Germany
$9.99
4. Tacitus: The Histories, Volumes
$7.74
5. The Agricola (Classic Reprint)
$13.35
6. Opera Minora (Latin Edition)
$8.00
7. The Annals of Imperial Rome
$10.18
8. The Annals: The Reigns of Tiberius,
$18.99
9. The Agricola and Germania of Cornelius
$25.88
10. The Reign of Tiberius, Out of
$9.99
11. A Dialogue Concerning Oratory,
$27.88
12. The histories of Tacitus; an English
13. Tacitus on Britain and Germany:
$59.87
14. The Annals of Tacitus: Volume
$24.29
15. The Annals of Tacitus
$26.57
16. The Cambridge Companion to Tacitus
$30.67
17. Historiae I-V (Oxford Classical
 
$134.58
18. Tacitus in Renaissance Political
$32.88
19. The Annals
20. The Germany and the Agricola of

1. Complete Works of Tacitus
by Tacitus
Paperback: 773 Pages (1964-09-01)
-- used & new: US$11.97
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0075536390
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Translated by Alfred John Church and William Jackson Brodribb, Edited, with an Introduction, Moses Hadas ... Read more

Customer Reviews (10)

4-0 out of 5 stars Best edition of Tacitus despite design flaws
First, there are some things not to like about this edition (why I'm subtracting a star):

* small format pages
* Narrow margins means it's difficult to hold onto book without blocking text.

Really this book needs to be printed on slightly larger paper and given a little more in the way of margin space.Yes, this would make it a bit more expensive but you get what you pay for.

Otherwise, I think this is a good complete translation of the works of Tacitus.I found the translation accessible and quite readable, and the character of the author came across very well. In this book you will find a wealth of information about Roman history as well as some misc. other writings by Tacitus (The Agricola, The Germania, and a dialog on oratory).The work covers a wide range of topics concerning Rome, and provides a clear sense of what Tacitus thought and was trying to achieve with his writings.While one can never put a writing into the author's context in translation, this comes remarkably close.

I'd recommend this edition.I just wish they'd do better book design....

5-0 out of 5 stars Preterist Proof
This book is an excellent book by Tacitus who wrote down what he saw during the destruction of the temple.I mostly purchased this book as I was told in this one Tacitus saw the sign of the Son of Man just as Jesus predicted was to take place within their generation (Matthew 24:34) which Tacitus saw.Of course he did not see the bodily return which is still future, but this is just further proof of what Jesus really meant in Matthew 24 when He talked about His coming that resulted in carcasses Matthew 24:28, and mourning Matthew 24:30, and not the resurrection type of coming which is found in 1 Thes. 4, 5 which is not up to us to know when.With the bodily return at the end of our age there is no need for a sign in the sky because everyone will visibly see Him which results in resurrection.Due to the lack of the majority of Christians understanding passages like Isaiah 13:9 people easily misunderstand what is meant by His coming in Matthew 23-24.Josephus Wars also records similar sighting of the sign of the Son of Man in the sky.If you have a difficult time determining whether or not God can tell time based on the new testament verses, this is another book to get to prove God can tell time or keep track of His own invention of time.

5-0 out of 5 stars A great critic ofempire--yet a product of the imperial system
I became interested in Tacitus while reading Robert Graves' I, Claudius.Having familiarized myself with the labyrinthine Julio-Claudian family tree, I thought I would give the Annals a try.I assumed I would find a chronicle of the debauchery and intrigues of Livia, Tiberius, Sejanus et al, which I did, but I was pleasantly surprised to find much more.

Tacitus rose to prominence in an age of empire, but he nevertheless laments the decadence and complacency of his age, and looks back longingly to the stalwart and uncompromising republic.He caustically criticizes those of his own time who have traded freedom for safety under the imperial system. In the Annals, Tacitus focuses much on Germanicus, who he sees as a throwback to the days of the republic, and doomed never to realize his potential because he is born in the wrong era.

Tacitus' most devastating criticism of empire, however, appears in the later small work,Agricola, which Tacitus wrote as an encomium to his father-in-law, Gnaeus Julius Agricola, a renown Roman general who served in Britain.At one point in the story, Tacitus places a speech in the mouth of a Scottish chieftain named Galgacus, whose force is preparing to do battle with the Romans.Galgacus' speech is at once a condemnation of Roman depredations, and a rousing call to arms to Galgacus' followers.It is a very inspirational speech, containing elements similar to Shakespeare's St. Crispin's Day speech in Henry V and Richard II's sceptr'd isle.Galgacus's speech is the source of the quote now popular among critics of U.S. foreign policy: "They make a desert and call it peace." Although in this translation it is rendered, "They make a solitude and call it peace."

4-0 out of 5 stars Heavy introduction to Roman politicsand warfare
I have just started reading Tacitus, but I want to respond and thereby get rid of your question.
As stated in the introduction, Tacitus is very difficult to translate. This is also obvious from the text. Frequently two interpretations are possible.
However, the content is well worth reading. You get pretty close to the personalities with their often disagreeable traits. The text reminds me of Herodotus in often starting a discussion, implicitly with the reader.
I look forward to reading the full book. Given the rather heavy substance, I have interrupted it temporarily for "Down the Nile".

5-0 out of 5 stars Old-fashioned value
Praise of Tacitus would be superfluous; but this edition is pure gold, unlike other series (ie. Livy) where one would sell it piecemeal the publishers have graciously bundled everything up in one unit, and deserve 5 stars for the effort, buy this book!...NOW! ... Read more


2. The Germania & Agricola of Caius Cornelius Tacitus,
by Cornelius. Tacitus
Paperback: 212 Pages (2009-04-27)
list price: US$20.99 -- used & new: US$20.99
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Asin: B002K2RTK0
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Product Description
This volume is produced from digital images created through the University of Michigan University Library's preservation reformatting program. The Library seeks to preserve the intellectual content of items in a manner that facilitates and promotes a variety of uses. The digital reformatting process results in an electronic version of the text that can both be accessed online and used to create new print copies. This book and thousands of others can be found in the digital collections of the University of Michigan Library. The University Library also understands and values the utility of print, and makes reprints available through its Scholarly Publishing Office. ... Read more


3. Tacitus on Germany
by Cornelius Tacitus
Paperback: 24 Pages (2010-07-06)
list price: US$9.99 -- used & new: US$9.99
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Asin: B003VS157K
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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Tacitus on Germany is presented here in a high quality paperback edition. This popular classic work by Cornelius Tacitus is in the English language. If you enjoy the works of Cornelius Tacitus then we highly recommend this publication for your book collection. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (1)

4-0 out of 5 stars Invaluable to the modern historian
In the Germania, one of Tacitus' most valuable works, the author gives a First and Second Century look at the various Germanic tribes that hovered outside the eastern border of Roman Gaul. Beginning with a general geographic introduction, he reviews the culture all the various tribes shared, their religion, their war cries, their marriage and funeral rites, and the German way of war. In the remaining chapters, Tacitus describes the various tribes of the Germans and their location to one another and to major rivers and mountains; this is invaluable to the modern historian and is the most complete study of the Germany of late Rome.

Tacitus' writing is clear and thorough, giving us a consistent and accurate picture of the Germany of his day, a swirling cauldron of tribes filled with young men who fight bravely, though often just for the fun of it. We get a clear glimpse of the German character, his rites and his habits, his strengths and his weaknesses. There is no other book quite like it, and in its four dozen short chapters we come to know not only who waited outside Rome's borders, but why Tacitus thought they were a reason for concern.

While there's not much to not like about Germania, I do think Tacitus overplays the innocent virtue of the Germans, drawing too many parallels between their character that of the old Roman Republic. While his political purpose was important to him, it is less important to us, if only because we can see in hindsight that the Germans were not so different from the Romans in the end. That they didn't have wealth and splendor does not mean they didn't desire it; it only means that they had not yet acquired it. It will turn out, however, that they are as willing to take it from the Romans as the Romans were from everyone else. ... Read more


4. Tacitus: The Histories, Volumes I and II
by Cornelius Tacitus
Paperback: 266 Pages (2010-07-12)
list price: US$9.99 -- used & new: US$9.99
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Asin: B003YJESVG
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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Product Description
Tacitus: The Histories, Volumes I and II is presented here in a high quality paperback edition. This popular classic work by Cornelius Tacitus is in the English language. If you enjoy the works of Cornelius Tacitus then we highly recommend this publication for your book collection. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (1)

4-0 out of 5 stars Does anyone at amazon check categories?
There I was, cruising the "Alternative History" subcategory of Science fiction books when I stumbled upon my old friend Tacitus. How he wound up here I can only guess. I suppose that a computer sort is resonsible. This book is one of the most cited sources for contemporaneous historical comentary on Roman warfare and political history. It was the source of many homework assignments in my youth. If you truly want an alternative to the events of today, this work will take you back to the doings of 2,000 years ago. One can marvel that the more things change, the more they do remain the same. Buy it and stretch your mind. ... Read more


5. The Agricola (Classic Reprint)
by Cornelius Tacitus
Paperback: 146 Pages (2010-04-17)
list price: US$7.74 -- used & new: US$7.74
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Asin: 144008761X
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CORNELlI TA8ITI DE VITA IULII AGRICOLAE LIBER CIa.rorum virorum facta moresque posteris trad.ere,l anti.q uitus usita. tum, ne no-stris quidem temporibus quall)quam incuriosa suo~um aetas amisit, quotiens magna ~.l~qua ac nobilis virtus vicit ac supergre.ssa est vitium parvis magnisque civitatibus commune, ignoran- 5 tia,IT. recti ~t invidiam. Sed apud priorcs ~ agerc digna memora.tu pronum magisque in apcrto crat, ita celeberrimus quisque ingenio ad prodendarn virt.ufu ~ernoIi~~l' sine' 'gratia 'aut ambitione ..QQnac_tantum '"? ~cientiae pre~ ducebatur. Ac plerique suam ipsi 10 vitam narraTe fiduci.am potim~ morum quam adroganti.'. l.m arbitrati sunt; nec id Rutilio et SC3.uro citra fidem aut obtrectationi (uit: adeo virtutes isdem temporibus optime ae.stimantur, quibus facillime gignuntur. At nunc narraturo mihi vitam defuncti hominis venia opus 15 fuit, quam non petissem incusaturus hm s&eva et infe. st:l. virtutibus tcmpora. L~gimu~, cum Arulcn~ RustielS r

Table of Contents

CONTENTS; b""l'RODVOTIO~ :; 1 Tho Lire of Tacitus; II, 'Vritin~; HI rurposo and Literary }<'onn of the A(J,?cola; IV 1'110 Style of 1'acitus; V ~[anuscl'ipts of be A(Jricola; VI Editions and 'VorkB of Reference; TEXT; Nons; CRITICAL ,AI'l'E~OIX; ?; PAO~; ix; xiv; xv; , xix; ? Xxv; , xx"j; 1; 81; ? 106

About the Publisher

Forgotten Books is a publisher of historical writings, such as: Philosophy, Classics, Science, Religion, History, Folklore and Mythology.

Forgotten Books' Classic Reprint Series utilizes the latest technology to regenerate facsimiles of historically important writings. Careful attention has been made to accurately preserve the original format of each page whilst digitally enhancing the difficult to read text. Read books online for free at www.forgottenbooks.org ... Read more


6. Opera Minora (Latin Edition)
by Cornelius Tacitus, Henry Furneaux
Paperback: 124 Pages (2009-11-12)
list price: US$19.99 -- used & new: US$13.35
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Asin: 111638504X
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7. The Annals of Imperial Rome
by Cornelius Tacitus
Paperback: 240 Pages (2005-01-01)
list price: US$9.99 -- used & new: US$8.00
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Asin: 1420926683
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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One of the most important historical records from classical antiquity, "The Annals of Imperial Rome" chronicles the history of the Roman Empire from the reign of Tiberius beginning in 14 A.D. to the reign of Nero ending in 66 A.D. Written by Cornelius Tacitus, Roman Senator during the second century A.D., "The Annals of Imperial Rome" is a detailed first-hand account of the early Roman Empire. Presented in this volume is the classic translation of Alfred John Church and William Jackson Brodribb. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (32)

3-0 out of 5 stars Decent, but no chapter numbers!
The biggest problem with this translation is that there are no chapter numbers, making it very difficult to figure out where you are in the text.

4-0 out of 5 stars the armchair historian reads again
While reading this, I was grateful that I'd fairly recently read a contemporary overview of the history of Rome, because that help me put some structure to the book. As a consequence, I was able to read it for the anecdotes and asides rather than worrying overly much about how things fit together.

There are many many actual historians out there who can give you smart reviews about Tacitus as history. There are also many Latin scholars out there who can either laud or criticize Grant's translation. What I can say is that it is an important and enjoyable read for even the more armchair historian reader. I'm just grateful that I'm not back in college trying to read the Latin for myself-- about the translation I will only note that it seems to flow smoothly and the style is good.

Tacitus was fascinated with the character of the people who made history-- a writer after my own heart. His descriptions are vivid, and the moments he painted remain fixed on the inner eye as you progress through the book. It is occasionally frustrating that much of Tacitus seems to be missing. The jumps and starts in the narrative are tough once you start connecting to the people.

Still, a great book. Recommended.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Vital Primary Source on Imperial Rome
Anyone who has even casually read about Roman imperial history will have encountered Tacitus.He is, according to translator and noted classicist Michael Grant, virtually the only Latin historian we have for the early days of the Roman Empire.This work, generally considered Tacitus' greatest, covers the period from shortly before Augustus' death to AD 69, about three years before Nero's death.Unfortunately, we don't have the entire work.(The Annals only survived into the Middle Ages through two manuscripts, one for each half of the work.)The section on Caligula is totally missing, and we only have parts of Tiberius' and Claudius' reigns.

It's history with a moral purpose:to punish evil and reward virtue through the judgement of posterity.Grant calls Tacitus' Latin "unusual and difficult", possessing a pungent simplicity in the original.Has Grant rendered it accurately?Not knowing Latin, I have no idea.(The problem of translation is further complicated by possible corruption in those two manuscripts.)As it appears here, it's a stylish history, particularly in its many speeches.

Tacitus himself was a noted orator and wrote about the art.The speeches he gives us range from mutinous Roman soldiers and Agrippina (wife of Tiberius' nephew Germanicus) reacting to said troops, German barbarians, and some of Nero's victims before they "opened their veins" after his condemnation.I say Tacitus gives us those speeches because they are all invented.There's no way Tactitus would have a verbatim record of what was said.However, as Grant makes clear, he's operating in a tradition of ancient historical writing as well as trying to tell a compelling story.

Grant claims that Tacitus' account of Tiberius' reign is usually considered the highest example of his art.There is certainly art there.I didn't find the condemnation of Tiberius entirely convincing though, and Grant argues that Tacitus is reacting to his experiences as a senator under the tyrannical reign of Domitian rather than Tiberius' who died before Tacitus was born.There is much on Rome's intervention in Parthian and Armenian politics.I found the reign of Nero the most interesting with Tacitus noting the craven, cowardly flattery of most of Rome's nobility along with a few who would not abase themselves.(The amount of people who pliantly committed suicide after facing Nero's disapproval is explained by their effort to protect surviving family members and to preserve at least a portion of their estate.)

Grant helpfully footnotes some of the allusions to missing parts of the work or earlier episodes of Roman history.Still, I wouldn't attempt this work without first reading a general history of the period.Grant does put in a nice glossary of Roman political and military terms.Frankly, I didn't need to look at it, but I did happen to glance at some of the entries.Grant chooses, here, to make some unconventional translations of some terms, particularly the military ones.I'm not sure why.I haven't seen things like "company-commander" for centurion in his other work including his later _The Army of the Caesars_.

The several included maps show almost all the referenced places, and there are four very necessary pages covering the complicated genealogies surrounding the Julio-Claudian emperors.

4-0 out of 5 stars Tactius Part of the Whole
An excellent piece of work on it's own. However, because it's by an "ancient historian" we should always remember that it needs supplementation by other writers of the time.

5-0 out of 5 stars Definitive Primary Source On the History OfImperial Roman
I read this book for a graduate course in Roman history.It is an indispensable primary source for students of Roman history.

On the first page of his Annals of Imperial Rome, Tacitus wrote that Octavian "seduced the army with bonuses, and his cheap food policy was successful bait for civilians."Tacitus' description of Augustus' transformation of Rome from a republic into an empire is most illuminating as well."Upper-class survivors found that slavish obedience was the way to succeed, both politically and financially.They had profited from the revolution, and so now they liked the security of the existing arrangement better than the dangerous uncertainties of the old regime."

Sir Ronald Syme relied heavily on the work of Tacitus for his cogent narrative of Octavian's rise to power as Augustus.Syme's in-depth study of Tacitus' life and work was published in 1958.Tacitus' historical accuracy was doubted for centuries and Syme made a project of re-evaluating the accuracy of his historical writings.Syme believed that Tacitus was in a unique position to write about the birth and early political history of the Imperial period in Rome due to his very active political life.Tacitus had served as a senator, consul, and proconsul of Asia.In addition, he was known to be an excellent orator in his day.In his writings, Syme believed that Tacitus provided excellent accounts of Augustus' rise to power and his career as Rome's first Emperor.

Tacitus delved into the machinery of the new government, including Augustus' use of patronage as well as his many thwarted attempts at planning for his own succession.What Syme found was a man that grew very adept politically and whose political maturity rapidly developed at an early age.At eighteen, he was named as heir to Julius Caesar.He grew into the greatest Roman princeps spanning fifty-six years until his death.Augustus knew that to retain power he had to maintain the general consent of the governed.He astutely maintained order not by following the constitution or past precedent, but by using the tremendous resources at his disposal.Augustus kept the plebeians in check making sure they were fed, kept them amused with games, and constantly reminded them that he was protecting them from the oppression of the nobiles.

Augustus became the "leader of a large and well organized political party as the source and fount of patronage and advancement."

Recommended reading for those interested in Roman history, military history.
... Read more


8. The Annals: The Reigns of Tiberius, Claudius, and Nero (Oxford World's Classics)
by Cornelius Tacitus, Anthony A. Barrett
Paperback: 592 Pages (2008-08-10)
list price: US$16.95 -- used & new: US$10.18
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Asin: 019282421X
Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
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Here is a lively new translation of Cornelius Tacitus' timeless history of three of Rome's most memorable emperors. Tacitus, who condemns the depravity of these rulers, which he saw as proof of the corrupting force of absolute power, writes caustically of the brutal and lecherous Tiberius, the weak and cuckolded Claudius, and "the artist" Nero. In particular, his gripping account of the bloody reigns of Tiberius and Nero brims with plots, murder, poisoning, suicide, uprisings, death, and destruction.The Annals also provides a vivid account of the violent suppression of the revolt led by Boudicca in Britain, the great fire of Rome under Nero, and the subsequent bloody persecution of the Christians. J. C. Yardley's translation is vivid without sacrificing accuracy, and is based on the recent Latin Heubner text, with variations noted in an appendix. Anthony A. Barrett's introduction and notes provide invaluable historical and cultural context. This superb edition also includes maps, a glossary of Roman terms and place names, and a full index of names and places. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (3)

1-0 out of 5 stars Fine translation; book marred by formatting issues with kindle
First, there are no hyperlinks to the end notes, which are essential in a work that can sometimes be obscure. A real pain in this work. Also, the rendering of this text and another Oxford world classics text I bought (Suetonius) is rendered very poorly so that when you search for a term, that term will often not show up because it does not recognize the word.This is also shown when you highlight a passage and go to "my highlights and notes" to find that the text often shows up garbled because it has been rendered poorly. The translation and notes are fine, but the problems I'm having with the text make this a bad purchase.

4-0 out of 5 stars The Annal
This book is very easy to read and understand with the translation and makes a great foundation for the study of the reigns of Tiberius, Claudius, and Nero. Would recommend for anyone beginning a study of the Julio-Claudian emperors.

5-0 out of 5 stars Interesting read
First of all, I purchased this book for a Classic Civilization class that I'm currently enrolled in that is solely dedicated to the Roman Emperor Nero, his reign, and the ultimate fall of the Julio-Claudian empire.

I have not read the book in its entirety (really I've only read sections pertaining to Nero, Agrippina, Octavia, Poppaea and so on), but it's an interesting bit of ancient Roman history. If you're a history buff, it may or may not be for you, depending on how "factual" you like your history. What I mean is that Tacitus' writing is in some, if not many cases unverifiable and sounds a little ridiculous. On other occasions, his information seems to generally agree with other historians who wrote about the same time periods. Always be suspicious of what he writes and always ask what his motives were. ... Read more


9. The Agricola and Germania of Cornelius Tacitus: With Explanatory Notes and Maps [1885 ]
by Cornelius Tacitus
Paperback: 178 Pages (2009-09-22)
list price: US$18.99 -- used & new: US$18.99
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Asin: 1112463070
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Product Description
Originally published in 1885.This volume from the Cornell University Library's print collections was scanned on an APT BookScan and converted to JPG 2000 format by Kirtas Technologies.All titles scanned cover to cover and pages may include marks notations and other marginalia present in the original volume. ... Read more


10. The Reign of Tiberius, Out of the First Six Annals of Tacitus; With His Account of Germany, and Life of Agricola
by Cornelius Tacitus
Paperback: 172 Pages (2010-09-05)
list price: US$25.88 -- used & new: US$25.88
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Asin: 1153718839
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The book has no illustrations or index. Purchasers are entitled to a free trial membership in the General Books Club where they can select from more than a million books without charge. Subjects: Germanic peoples; Rome; Germany; Germanic tribes; History / Ancient / General; History / Ancient / Rome; History / Europe / Germany; ... Read more


11. A Dialogue Concerning Oratory, Or The Causes Of Corrupt Eloquence - The Works Of Cornelius Tacitus, Volume 8 (of 8); With An Essay On - His Life And Genius, Notes, Supplements
by Cornelius Tacitus
Paperback: 144 Pages (2010-07-12)
list price: US$9.99 -- used & new: US$9.99
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Asin: B003YKG73C
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A Dialogue Concerning Oratory, Or The Causes Of Corrupt Eloquence - The Works Of Cornelius Tacitus, Volume 8 (of 8); With An Essay On - His Life And Genius, Notes, Supplements is presented here in a high quality paperback edition. This popular classic work by Cornelius Tacitus is in the English language. If you enjoy the works of Cornelius Tacitus then we highly recommend this publication for your book collection. ... Read more


12. The histories of Tacitus; an English translation with introduction, frontispiece, notes, maps and index
by Cornelius Tacitus, George Gilbert Ramsay
Paperback: 548 Pages (2010-07-30)
list price: US$41.75 -- used & new: US$27.88
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Asin: 1176417258
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13. Tacitus on Britain and Germany: A translation of the Agricola and the Germania (Penguin classics)
by Cornelius Tacitus
Paperback: 175 Pages (1948)

Asin: B0007JEHFI
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14. The Annals of Tacitus: Volume 1, Annals 1.1-54 (Cambridge Classical Texts and Commentaries) (Books 1-6)
by Tacitus
Paperback: 380 Pages (2005-01-20)
list price: US$65.00 -- used & new: US$59.87
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Asin: 0521609313
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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The first in a four-volume edition of Tacitus Annals 1-6. The Annals are Tacitus' brilliant account of Roman imperial history from the death of Augustus to the death of Nero. Books 1-6 describe the reign of Tiberius. Professor Goodyear's introduction to the series deals concisely with the background to the Annals. He outlines the history of Tacitean scholarship to the present day and shows how Tacitus' historical judgements were sometimes distorted by his preoccupations with style and with the moral function of historical writing. The commentary attends equally to literary, historical and textual questions. There are several appendixes on topics of more specialized interest. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Definitive Primary Source On the History OfImperial Roman
I read this book for a graduate course in Roman history.It is an indispensable primary source for students of Roman history.

On the first page of his Annals of Imperial Rome, Tacitus wrote that Octavian "seduced the army with bonuses, and his cheap food policy was successful bait for civilians."Tacitus' description of Augustus' transformation of Rome from a republic into an empire is most illuminating as well."Upper-class survivors found that slavish obedience was the way to succeed, both politically and financially.They had profited from the revolution, and so now they liked the security of the existing arrangement better than the dangerous uncertainties of the old regime."

Sir Ronald Syme relied heavily on the work of Tacitus for his cogent narrative of Octavian's rise to power as Augustus.Syme's in-depth study of Tacitus' life and work was published in 1958.Tacitus' historical accuracy was doubted for centuries and Syme made a project of re-evaluating the accuracy of his historical writings.Syme believed that Tacitus was in a unique position to write about the birth and early political history of the Imperial period in Rome due to his very active political life.Tacitus had served as a senator, consul, and proconsul of Asia.In addition, he was known to be an excellent orator in his day.In his writings, Syme believed that Tacitus provided excellent accounts of Augustus' rise to power and his career as Rome's first Emperor.

Tacitus delved into the machinery of the new government, including Augustus' use of patronage as well as his many thwarted attempts at planning for his own succession.What Syme found was a man that grew very adept politically and whose political maturity rapidly developed at an early age.At eighteen, he was named as heir to Julius Caesar.He grew into the greatest Roman princeps spanning fifty-six years until his death.Augustus knew that to retain power he had to maintain the general consent of the governed.He astutely maintained order not by following the constitution or past precedent, but by using the tremendous resources at his disposal.Augustus kept the plebeians in check making sure they were fed, kept them amused with games, and constantly reminded them that he was protecting them from the oppression of the nobiles.

Augustus became the "leader of a large and well organized political party as the source and fount of patronage and advancement."

Recommended reading for those interested in Roman history, military history.
... Read more


15. The Annals of Tacitus
by Cornelius Tacitus, George Otis Holbrooke
Paperback: 582 Pages (2010-02-23)
list price: US$43.75 -- used & new: US$24.29
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1145368492
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words.This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Definitive Primary Source On the History OfImperial Roman
I read this book for a graduate course in Roman history.It is an indispensable primary source for students of Roman history.

On the first page of his Annals of Imperial Rome, Tacitus wrote that Octavian "seduced the army with bonuses, and his cheap food policy was successful bait for civilians."Tacitus' description of Augustus' transformation of Rome from a republic into an empire is most illuminating as well."Upper-class survivors found that slavish obedience was the way to succeed, both politically and financially.They had profited from the revolution, and so now they liked the security of the existing arrangement better than the dangerous uncertainties of the old regime."

Sir Ronald Syme relied heavily on the work of Tacitus for his cogent narrative of Octavian's rise to power as Augustus.Syme's in-depth study of Tacitus' life and work was published in 1958.Tacitus' historical accuracy was doubted for centuries and Syme made a project of re-evaluating the accuracy of his historical writings.Syme believed that Tacitus was in a unique position to write about the birth and early political history of the Imperial period in Rome due to his very active political life.Tacitus had served as a senator, consul, and proconsul of Asia.In addition, he was known to be an excellent orator in his day.In his writings, Syme believed that Tacitus provided excellent accounts of Augustus' rise to power and his career as Rome's first Emperor.

Tacitus delved into the machinery of the new government, including Augustus' use of patronage as well as his many thwarted attempts at planning for his own succession.What Syme found was a man that grew very adept politically and whose political maturity rapidly developed at an early age.At eighteen, he was named as heir to Julius Caesar.He grew into the greatest Roman princeps spanning fifty-six years until his death.Augustus knew that to retain power he had to maintain the general consent of the governed.He astutely maintained order not by following the constitution or past precedent, but by using the tremendous resources at his disposal.Augustus kept the plebeians in check making sure they were fed, kept them amused with games, and constantly reminded them that he was protecting them from the oppression of the nobiles.

Augustus became the "leader of a large and well organized political party as the source and fount of patronage and advancement."

Recommended reading for those interested in Roman history, military history.
... Read more


16. The Cambridge Companion to Tacitus (Cambridge Companions to Literature)
Paperback: 386 Pages (2010-03-15)
list price: US$32.99 -- used & new: US$26.57
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0521697484
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
Tacitus is universally recognized as ancient Rome's greatest writer of history, and his account of the Roman Empire in the first century AD has been fundamental in shaping the modern perception of Rome and its emperors. This Companion provides a new, up-to-date and authoritative assessment of his work and influence which will be invaluable for students and non-specialists as well as of interest to established scholars in the field. First situating Tacitus within the tradition of Roman historical writing and his own contemporary society, it goes on to analyze each of his individual works and then discuss key topics such as his distinctive authorial voice and his views of history and freedom. It ends by tracing Tacitus' reception, beginning with the transition from manuscript to printed editions, describing his influence on political thought in early modern Europe, and concluding with his significance in the twentieth century. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (1)

4-0 out of 5 stars Fresh approach to Tacitus
This new Cambridge Companion not only updates Tacitean scholarship, but adds a freshness and vitality to it as well.So far, I have been inspired by Tony Woodman's Introduction and his call for the continuation not only of research on Tacitus, but also appreciation of this great writer.Anthony Birley's chapter situates the Agricola well in current scholarship, while Rhiannon Ash's chapter on the Histories is truly an excellent and fresh approach which suits the first time reader as well as the seasoned veteran of Tacitus' Histories.All in all, a worthy addition to the Cambridge series and to Tacitus scholarship in general by leading scholars in the field. ... Read more


17. Historiae I-V (Oxford Classical Texts) (Latin Edition)
by Cornelius Tacitus
Hardcover: 272 Pages (1922-02-22)
list price: US$44.50 -- used & new: US$30.67
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0198146345
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18. Tacitus in Renaissance Political Thought
by Kenneth C. Schellhase
 Hardcover: 283 Pages (1977-03)
list price: US$24.00 -- used & new: US$134.58
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0226737004
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19. The Annals
by P. Cornelius Tacitus
Hardcover: 338 Pages (2010-05-23)
list price: US$45.95 -- used & new: US$32.88
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1161456546
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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And now bills were passed, not only for national objects but for individual cases, and laws were most numerous when the commonwealth was most corrupt. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (6)

5-0 out of 5 stars Definitive Primary Source On the History OfImperial Roman
I read this book for a graduate course in Roman history.It is an indispensable primary source for students of Roman history.

On the first page of his Annals of Imperial Rome, Tacitus wrote that Octavian "seduced the army with bonuses, and his cheap food policy was successful bait for civilians."Tacitus' description of Augustus' transformation of Rome from a republic into an empire is most illuminating as well."Upper-class survivors found that slavish obedience was the way to succeed, both politically and financially.They had profited from the revolution, and so now they liked the security of the existing arrangement better than the dangerous uncertainties of the old regime."

Sir Ronald Syme relied heavily on the work of Tacitus for his cogent narrative of Octavian's rise to power as Augustus.Syme's in-depth study of Tacitus' life and work was published in 1958.Tacitus' historical accuracy was doubted for centuries and Syme made a project of re-evaluating the accuracy of his historical writings.Syme believed that Tacitus was in a unique position to write about the birth and early political history of the Imperial period in Rome due to his very active political life.Tacitus had served as a senator, consul, and proconsul of Asia.In addition, he was known to be an excellent orator in his day.In his writings, Syme believed that Tacitus provided excellent accounts of Augustus' rise to power and his career as Rome's first Emperor.

Tacitus delved into the machinery of the new government, including Augustus' use of patronage as well as his many thwarted attempts at planning for his own succession.What Syme found was a man that grew very adept politically and whose political maturity rapidly developed at an early age.At eighteen, he was named as heir to Julius Caesar.He grew into the greatest Roman princeps spanning fifty-six years until his death.Augustus knew that to retain power he had to maintain the general consent of the governed.He astutely maintained order not by following the constitution or past precedent, but by using the tremendous resources at his disposal.Augustus kept the plebeians in check making sure they were fed, kept them amused with games, and constantly reminded them that he was protecting them from the oppression of the nobiles.

Augustus became the "leader of a large and well organized political party as the source and fount of patronage and advancement."

Recommended reading for those interested in Roman history, military history.

5-0 out of 5 stars Definitive Primary Source On the History OfImperial Roman
I read this book for a graduate course in Roman history.It is an indispensable primary source for students of Roman history.

On the first page of his Annals of Imperial Rome, Tacitus wrote that Octavian "seduced the army with bonuses, and his cheap food policy was successful bait for civilians."Tacitus' description of Augustus' transformation of Rome from a republic into an empire is most illuminating as well."Upper-class survivors found that slavish obedience was the way to succeed, both politically and financially.They had profited from the revolution, and so now they liked the security of the existing arrangement better than the dangerous uncertainties of the old regime."

Sir Ronald Syme relied heavily on the work of Tacitus for his cogent narrative of Octavian's rise to power as Augustus.Syme's in-depth study of Tacitus' life and work was published in 1958.Tacitus' historical accuracy was doubted for centuries and Syme made a project of re-evaluating the accuracy of his historical writings.Syme believed that Tacitus was in a unique position to write about the birth and early political history of the Imperial period in Rome due to his very active political life.Tacitus had served as a senator, consul, and proconsul of Asia.In addition, he was known to be an excellent orator in his day.In his writings, Syme believed that Tacitus provided excellent accounts of Augustus' rise to power and his career as Rome's first Emperor.

Tacitus delved into the machinery of the new government, including Augustus' use of patronage as well as his many thwarted attempts at planning for his own succession.What Syme found was a man that grew very adept politically and whose political maturity rapidly developed at an early age.At eighteen, he was named as heir to Julius Caesar.He grew into the greatest Roman princeps spanning fifty-six years until his death.Augustus knew that to retain power he had to maintain the general consent of the governed.He astutely maintained order not by following the constitution or past precedent, but by using the tremendous resources at his disposal.Augustus kept the plebeians in check making sure they were fed, kept them amused with games, and constantly reminded them that he was protecting them from the oppression of the nobiles.

Augustus became the "leader of a large and well organized political party as the source and fount of patronage and advancement."

Recommended reading for those interested in Roman history, military history.

5-0 out of 5 stars Definitive Primary Source On the History OfImperial Roman
I read this book for a graduate course in Roman history.It is an indispensable primary source for students of Roman history.

On the first page of his Annals of Imperial Rome, Tacitus wrote that Octavian "seduced the army with bonuses, and his cheap food policy was successful bait for civilians."Tacitus' description of Augustus' transformation of Rome from a republic into an empire is most illuminating as well."Upper-class survivors found that slavish obedience was the way to succeed, both politically and financially.They had profited from the revolution, and so now they liked the security of the existing arrangement better than the dangerous uncertainties of the old regime."

Sir Ronald Syme relied heavily on the work of Tacitus for his cogent narrative of Octavian's rise to power as Augustus.Syme's in-depth study of Tacitus' life and work was published in 1958.Tacitus' historical accuracy was doubted for centuries and Syme made a project of re-evaluating the accuracy of his historical writings.Syme believed that Tacitus was in a unique position to write about the birth and early political history of the Imperial period in Rome due to his very active political life.Tacitus had served as a senator, consul, and proconsul of Asia.In addition, he was known to be an excellent orator in his day.In his writings, Syme believed that Tacitus provided excellent accounts of Augustus' rise to power and his career as Rome's first Emperor.

Tacitus delved into the machinery of the new government, including Augustus' use of patronage as well as his many thwarted attempts at planning for his own succession.What Syme found was a man that grew very adept politically and whose political maturity rapidly developed at an early age.At eighteen, he was named as heir to Julius Caesar.He grew into the greatest Roman princeps spanning fifty-six years until his death.Augustus knew that to retain power he had to maintain the general consent of the governed.He astutely maintained order not by following the constitution or past precedent, but by using the tremendous resources at his disposal.Augustus kept the plebeians in check making sure they were fed, kept them amused with games, and constantly reminded them that he was protecting them from the oppression of the nobiles.

Augustus became the "leader of a large and well organized political party as the source and fount of patronage and advancement."

Recommended reading for those interested in Roman history, military history.

5-0 out of 5 stars Definitive Primary Source On the History OfImperial Roman
I read this book for a graduate course in Roman history.It is an indispensable primary source for students of Roman history.

On the first page of his Annals of Imperial Rome, Tacitus wrote that Octavian "seduced the army with bonuses, and his cheap food policy was successful bait for civilians."Tacitus' description of Augustus' transformation of Rome from a republic into an empire is most illuminating as well."Upper-class survivors found that slavish obedience was the way to succeed, both politically and financially.They had profited from the revolution, and so now they liked the security of the existing arrangement better than the dangerous uncertainties of the old regime."

Sir Ronald Syme relied heavily on the work of Tacitus for his cogent narrative of Octavian's rise to power as Augustus.Syme's in-depth study of Tacitus' life and work was published in 1958.Tacitus' historical accuracy was doubted for centuries and Syme made a project of re-evaluating the accuracy of his historical writings.Syme believed that Tacitus was in a unique position to write about the birth and early political history of the Imperial period in Rome due to his very active political life.Tacitus had served as a senator, consul, and proconsul of Asia.In addition, he was known to be an excellent orator in his day.In his writings, Syme believed that Tacitus provided excellent accounts of Augustus' rise to power and his career as Rome's first Emperor.

Tacitus delved into the machinery of the new government, including Augustus' use of patronage as well as his many thwarted attempts at planning for his own succession.What Syme found was a man that grew very adept politically and whose political maturity rapidly developed at an early age.At eighteen, he was named as heir to Julius Caesar.He grew into the greatest Roman princeps spanning fifty-six years until his death.Augustus knew that to retain power he had to maintain the general consent of the governed.He astutely maintained order not by following the constitution or past precedent, but by using the tremendous resources at his disposal.Augustus kept the plebeians in check making sure they were fed, kept them amused with games, and constantly reminded them that he was protecting them from the oppression of the nobiles.

Augustus became the "leader of a large and well organized political party as the source and fount of patronage and advancement."

Recommended reading for those interested in Roman history, military history.

5-0 out of 5 stars Definitive Primary Source On the History OfImperial Roman
I read this book for a graduate course in Roman history.It is an indispensable primary source for students of Roman history.

On the first page of his Annals of Imperial Rome, Tacitus wrote that Octavian "seduced the army with bonuses, and his cheap food policy was successful bait for civilians."Tacitus' description of Augustus' transformation of Rome from a republic into an empire is most illuminating as well."Upper-class survivors found that slavish obedience was the way to succeed, both politically and financially.They had profited from the revolution, and so now they liked the security of the existing arrangement better than the dangerous uncertainties of the old regime."

Sir Ronald Syme relied heavily on the work of Tacitus for his cogent narrative of Octavian's rise to power as Augustus.Syme's in-depth study of Tacitus' life and work was published in 1958.Tacitus' historical accuracy was doubted for centuries and Syme made a project of re-evaluating the accuracy of his historical writings.Syme believed that Tacitus was in a unique position to write about the birth and early political history of the Imperial period in Rome due to his very active political life.Tacitus had served as a senator, consul, and proconsul of Asia.In addition, he was known to be an excellent orator in his day.In his writings, Syme believed that Tacitus provided excellent accounts of Augustus' rise to power and his career as Rome's first Emperor.

Tacitus delved into the machinery of the new government, including Augustus' use of patronage as well as his many thwarted attempts at planning for his own succession.What Syme found was a man that grew very adept politically and whose political maturity rapidly developed at an early age.At eighteen, he was named as heir to Julius Caesar.He grew into the greatest Roman princeps spanning fifty-six years until his death.Augustus knew that to retain power he had to maintain the general consent of the governed.He astutely maintained order not by following the constitution or past precedent, but by using the tremendous resources at his disposal.Augustus kept the plebeians in check making sure they were fed, kept them amused with games, and constantly reminded them that he was protecting them from the oppression of the nobiles.

Augustus became the "leader of a large and well organized political party as the source and fount of patronage and advancement."

Recommended reading for those interested in Roman history, military history.
... Read more


20. The Germany and the Agricola of Tacitus
by Caius Cornelius Tacitus
Kindle Edition: Pages (2005-02-01)
list price: US$0.00
Asin: B000JQUUIC
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Product Description
This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery. ... Read more


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