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1. The Landleaguers
 
2. Kept in the dark / by Anthony
3. Dr. Wortle's School
 
$119.95
4. Seductive Strategies In The Novels
5. Linda Tressel
6. The Struggles of Brown, Jones,
7. Cousin Henry
8. The Bertrams
9. Ralph the Heir
 
10. Thackeray
 
11. He knew he was right, by Anthony
 
12. An editors tales / Anthony Trollope
 
13. An editorÃ?¯Ã'¿Ã'½s
 
14. Thackeray ; edited by John Morley
 
15. The WEST INDIES And The SPANISH
 
16. RALPH The HEIR. A Novel.
 
17. The WARDEN. An Introduction by
 
18. The LIFE Of CICERO.
 
19. The THREE CLERKS. A Novel.
20. Dr. Wortle's School

1. The Landleaguers
by Anthony, 1815-1882 Trollope
Kindle Edition: Pages (2010-02-16)
list price: US$0.00
Asin: B0039GL23G
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Editorial Review

Product Description
This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery. ... Read more


2. Kept in the dark / by Anthony Trollope
by Anthony (1815-1882). Sir John Millais (ill.) Trollope
 Paperback: Pages (1978-01-01)

Asin: B003HMU7KQ
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3. Dr. Wortle's School
by Anthony, 1815-1882 Trollope
Kindle Edition: Pages (2009-10-04)
list price: US$1.99
Asin: B002RKS59Y
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Editorial Review

Product Description
This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery. ... Read more


4. Seductive Strategies In The Novels Of Anthony Trollope (1815-1882) (Studies in British Literature)
by Laurent Bury
 Hardcover: 304 Pages (2004-07)
list price: US$119.95 -- used & new: US$119.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0773463615
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Acknowledgements; Preface; Introduction; 1. On sundry seductresses; 2. The art of charming the senses; 3. Refinement and barbarity; 4. Angels and demons; 5. Social seduction; 6. The writer as seducer: first attempts; 7. To please or not to please; 8. Anti-seduction and self-seduction; Bibliography; Index; Names Cited ... Read more


5. Linda Tressel
by Anthony, 1815-1882 Trollope
Kindle Edition: Pages (2010-06-11)
list price: US$4.95
Asin: B003R50N3Y
Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars
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"The troubles and sorrows of Linda Tressel, who is the heroine of the little story now about to be told, arose from the too rigid virtue of her nearest and most loving friend,—as troubles will sometimes come from rigid virtue when rigid virtue is not accompanied by sound sense, and especially when it knows little or nothing of the softness of mercy.

The nearest and dearest friend of Linda Tressel was her aunt, the widow Staubach—Madame Charlotte Staubach, as she had come to be called in the little town of Nuremberg where she lived. In Nuremberg all houses are picturesque, but you shall go through the entire city and find no more picturesque abode than the small red house with the three gables close down by the river-side in the Schütt island—the little island made by the river Pegnitz in the middle of the town. They who have seen the widow Staubach's house will have remembered it, not only because of its bright colour and its sharp gables, but also because of the garden which runs between the house and the water's edge. And yet the garden was no bigger than may often nowadays be seen in the balconies of the mansions of Paris and of London. Here Linda Tressel lived with her aunt, and here also Linda had been born.

Linda was the orphan of Herr Tressel, who had for many years been what we may call town-clerk to the magistrates of Nuremberg. Chance in middle life had taken him to Cologne—a German city indeed, as was his own, but a city so far away from Nuremberg that its people and its manners were as strange to him as though he had gone beyond the reach of his own mother-tongue. But here he had married, and from Cologne had brought home his bride to the picturesque, red, gabled house by the water's side in his own city. His wife's only sister had also married, in her own town; and that sister was the virtuous but rigid aunt Charlotte, to live with whom had been the fate in life of Linda Tressel.

It need not be more than told in the fewest words that the town-clerk and the town-clerk's wife both died when Linda was but an infant, and that the husband of her aunt Charlotte died also. In Nuremberg there is no possession so much coveted and so dearly loved as that of the house in which the family lives. Herr Tressel had owned the house with the three gables, and so had his father before him, and to the father it had come from an uncle whose name had been different,—and to him from some other relative. But it was an old family property, and, like other houses in Nuremberg, was to be kept in the hands of the family while the family might remain, unless some terrible ruin should supervene."

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Customer Reviews (2)

3-0 out of 5 stars It's un-Trollopean alright!
I could see where this book might have appealed to a Victorian audience; as a modern reader, I found it tough going, though not as much so as much "Alice Dugdale" - a real yawner.
The supporting characters carry the story pretty much, but I could've used a bit more mouth-foaming zealotry from the aunt to jazz it up even more.

3-0 out of 5 stars An Overweighted Romance
Appearing anonymously as "By the Author of Nina Balatka", "Linda Tressel" was the second and last installment in Anthony Trollope's attempt to establish an alternative literary persona that could deviate from the Trollopian staples (not that the deviation was very startling; maidens urged to marry men whom they don't love are not exactly an unknown subject to our author).

Like the earlier book, "Linda" takes place in a foreign city that the author had recently visited, in this case Nuremberg, and deals with the effect of religious bigotry on love and marriage.This time, instead of violently opposing a union, the bigoted aunt is trying to promote one, and the heroine struggles to escape into either spinsterhood or the arms of a more acceptable lover than the middle-aged boor who has been picked out for her.

The personae of "Linda Tressel" - all odd ducks except for Linda herself - belong to comedy, and a work in that vein might have succeeded.Trollope chose, however, to write a tale that becomes progressively grimmer, eventually toppling the lightweight characters.The book was not a total failure.It drew praise from Henry James (who guessed the author's identity from stylistic clues) and has both lively and pathetic moments.On the whole, though, one does not, after putting it down, feel deep regret that the "alternative Trollope" had no further literary career. ... Read more


6. The Struggles of Brown, Jones, and RobinsonBy One of the Firm
by Anthony, 1815-1882 Trollope
Kindle Edition: Pages (2009-10-04)
list price: US$1.99
Asin: B002RKS66G
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Product Description
This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery. ... Read more


7. Cousin Henry
by Anthony, 1815-1882 Trollope
Kindle Edition: Pages (2010-06-13)
list price: US$4.95
Asin: B003RITVHK
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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From Content:

"I have a conscience, my dear, on this matter," said an old gentleman to a young lady, as the two were sitting in the breakfast parlour of a country house which looked down from the cliffs over the sea on the coast of Carmarthenshire.

"And so have I, Uncle Indefer; and as my conscience is backed by my inclination, whereas yours is not-"

"You think that I shall give way?"

"I did not mean that."

"What then?"

"If I could only make you understand how very strong is my inclination, or disinclination-how impossible to be conquered, then-"

"What next?"

"Then you would know that I could never give way, as you call it, and you would go to work with your own conscience to see whether it be imperative with you or not. You may be sure of this,-I shall never say a word to you in opposition to your conscience. If there be a word to be spoken it must come from yourself."

There was a long pause in the conversation, a silence for an hour, during which the girl went in and out of the room and settled herself down at her work. Then the old man went back abruptly to the subject they had discussed. "I shall obey my conscience."

"You ought to do so, Uncle Indefer. What should a man obey but his conscience?"

"Though it will break my heart."

"No; no, no!"

"And will ruin you."

"That is a flea's bite. I can brave my ruin easily, but not your broken heart."

"Why should there be either, Isabel?"

"Nay, sir; have you not said but now, because of our consciences? Not to save your heart from breaking,-though I think your heart is dearer to me than anything else in the world,-could I marry my cousin Henry. We must die together, both of us, you and I, or live broken-hearted, or what not, sooner than that. Would I not do anything possible at your bidding?"

"I used to think so."

"But it is impossible for a young woman with a respect for herself such as I have to submit herself to a man that she loathes. Do as your conscience bids you with the old house. Shall I be less tender to you while you live because I shall have to leave the place when you are dead? Shall I accuse you of injustice or unkindness in my heart? Never! All that is only an outside circumstance to me, comparatively of little moment. But to be the wife of a man I despise!" Then she got up and left the room.

A month passed by before the old man returned to the subject, which he did seated in the same room, at the same hour of the day,-at about four o'clock, when the dinner things had been removed.

"Isabel," he said, "I cannot help myself."

"As to what, Uncle Indefer?" She knew very well what was the matter in which, as he said, he could not help himself. Had there been anything in which his age had wanted assistance from her youth there would have been no hesitation between them; no daughter was ever more tender; no father was ever more trusting. But on this subject it was necessary that he should speak more plainly before she could reply to him."

... Read more

Customer Reviews (3)

3-0 out of 5 stars Hopefully not his best
I decided to read Anthony Trollop's "Cousin Henry" after reading the two available reviews. Although I enjoy nineteenth century British fiction, I have to confess I've never read anything by Trollop. The situation is a common one in this genre: Henry is supposed to inherit his uncle's property through entitlement, not because he is loved, admired or respected. Quite the contrary - he is none of those things and this makes up the bulk of the novel. Will Henry live up to, or overcome, his despicable character? While it is well-written, the author does tend to go over Henry's internal conflict again and again and again. Hopefully it's not his best; I look forward to trying something else by him.

4-0 out of 5 stars Good, but hardly his best
I love Trollope. He is my favorite nineteenth-century British writer. His style suits me down to the ground. I'd like anything he's written. I have twenty of his books lined up on a shelf. When I want a great treat, I pull one down and read it.

I got several chuckles out of poor Cousin Henry vacillating between his desire to do right and his desire to do wrong. Still, I don't think anyone besides the other reviewer here would call COUSIN HENRY Trollope's best book.

5-0 out of 5 stars One of Trollope's best
Browsing in a bookstore, I read a blurb of this book that told every secret twist of its plot. I was enraged, but read 'Cousin Henry' anyway. It was superb, and illustrates perfectly Trollope's own philosophy, given in'Barchester Towers,' that a good book will not suffer even from the readerknowing what happens. 'Cousin Henry' has other, and considerable, merits,than suspensefulness--although it is suspenseful. It has been called themost psychologically probing of Trollope's works; indeed, Trollope himselfthought it to be so, and was very proud of it. The plot, in brief, andwithout giving anything away, is this: Cousin Henry is the heir of theSquire of Llanfeare--according to the will everyone knows about. But Henryknows of another, later, will, that disinherits him. Most of the bookconcerns Henry's agonizing over whether or not to make this will public.There is also another plot thread, concerning the Squire's daughter,Isabel, who can only marry if her husband is willing to take her last name(shades of 'Cecilia'). I'll say it again: one of Trollope's best. ... Read more


8. The Bertrams
by Anthony, 1815-1882 Trollope
Kindle Edition: Pages (2010-06-10)
list price: US$5.95
Asin: B003R501FE
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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"This is undoubtedly the age of humanity—as far, at least, as England is concerned. A man who beats his wife is shocking to us, and a colonel who cannot manage his soldiers without having them beaten is nearly equally so. We are not very fond of hanging; and some of us go so far as to recoil under any circumstances from taking the blood of life. We perform our operations under chloroform; and it has even been suggested that those schoolmasters who insist on adhering in some sort to the doctrines of Solomon should perform their operations in the same guarded manner. If the disgrace be absolutely necessary, let it be inflicted; but not the bodily pain.

So far as regards the low externals of humanity, this is doubtless a humane age. Let men, women, and children have bread; let them have if possible no blows, or, at least, as few as may be; let them also be decently clothed; and let the pestilence be kept out of their way. In venturing to call these low, I have done so in no contemptuous spirit; they are comparatively low if the body be lower than the mind. The humanity of the age is doubtless suited to its material wants, and such wants are those which demand the promptest remedy. But in the inner feelings of men to men, and of one man's mind to another man's mind, is it not an age of extremest cruelty?

There is sympathy for the hungry man; but there is no sympathy for the unsuccessful man who is not hungry. If a fellow mortal be ragged, humanity will subscribe to mend his clothes; but humanity will subscribe nothing to mend his ragged hopes so long as his outside coat shall be whole and decent.

To him that hath shall be given; and from him that hath not shall be taken even that which he hath. This is the special text that we delight to follow, and success is the god that we delight to worship. "Ah! pity me. I have struggled and fallen—struggled so manfully, yet fallen so utterly—help me up this time that I may yet push forward once again!" Who listens to such a plea as this? "Fallen! do you want bread?" "Not bread, but a kind heart and a kind hand." "My friend, I cannot stay by you; I myself am in a hurry; there is that fiend of a rival there even now gaining a step on me. I beg your pardon; but I will put my foot on your shoulder—only for one moment. Occupet extremum scabies."

Yes. Let the devil take the hindmost; the three or four hindmost if you will; nay, all but those strong-running horses who can force themselves into noticeable places under the judge's eye. This is the noble shibboleth with which the English youth are now spurred on to deeds of—what shall we say?—money-making activity. Let every place in which a man can hold up his head be the reward of some antagonistic struggle, of some grand competitive examination. Let us get rid of the fault of past ages. With us, let the race be ever to the swift; the victory always to the strong. And let us always be racing, so that the swift and strong shall ever be known among us. But what, then, for those who are not swift, not strong? Væ victis! Let them go to the wall. They can hew wood probably; or, at any rate, draw water."

... Read more

Customer Reviews (6)

4-0 out of 5 stars Interesting, but not my favorite Trollope
In the lengthy passages about Palestine and Egypt in this work, Trollope tends to come off as a frustrated travel writer. Besides these strange interludes, this is really a classic Trollope work in the raw, emotionally painful vein. If you've read a good deal of Trollope before getting to this novel, you'll find distinct echoes of plots from He Knew He Was Right, The Way We Live Now, and other works. (I notice Trollope has a preferred method of dispensing with unworthy but problematic men). But there are some lively and original characters in this somber novel, making it well worth the read.

4-0 out of 5 stars the nature and limits of prudence
Books by Trollope that are not part of the two series (Palliser, Barsetshire) tend to be neglected.This one deserves far more attention.It is Trollope at his best.The structure is intricate, the characters superb, the pace brisk. the wit and satire sharp .No dry spells, no simpereing Victorian maidens.This has a Balzacian flavour to it; there are a number of characters looking for the main chance.Caroline is one of his most interesting creations.There are three plots which are both parallel and contrasting: George and Caroline, Adela and Arthur, and Sir Lionel's search for a rich heiress. I would say the major theme of the book is the limits of prudence. The scenes in Cairo and Jerusalem add color, an exotic quality, to the story.A delightful read.

5-0 out of 5 stars Trollope adds something different
Trollope delivers his usual good story with good characters but adds something new here--an Englishman's view of Jerusalem in the 1800s. It's fascinating, and he reveals his own Christian beliefs in this book very clearly. The two romances are also a little different from his usual ones--very satisfying, I thought. And, again, he does not neglect humor. Having read many Trollope novels, I rate this one among the best.

5-0 out of 5 stars Vintage Trollope
Trollope wrote "The Bertrams" fairly early in his writing career and to me it felt different from his usual fare.Of course there was his theme of boy meets girl, he/they fall in love, boy gets girl, boy loses girl, boy eventually wins girl. The emotion seemed more raw though.In "Bertrams" Trollope also threw in some exotic locales such as Jerusalem and Egypt.On the surface this can seem boring but Trollope was always so good at looking under his character's skin to their psychology, their emotions, and motivations.His writing never gets old for me and compared to some of today's harsher literature and even harsher current political/financial/emotional climate reading Trollope feels like a conversation with a trusted friend.He never lets you down.

5-0 out of 5 stars ONE OF HIS BEST
THE STORY IS ESSENTIALLY A LOVE STORY -- ABOUT 2 MAIN COUPLES. THERE ARE LOTS OF OTHER PSYCHOLOGICAL SUBPLOTS, ALSO. THE STORY INVOLVES TWO YOUNG MEN WHO ARE EACH IN LOVE, ONE GEORGE BERTRAM AND ONE ARTHUR W. GEORGE DENOUNCES HIS UNCLES MONEY AND WILL NOT BE MOVED TO ANY SORT OF ACTION BY IT -- THUS CAUSING THE WOMAN HE LOVES TO POSTPONE THEIR MARRIAGE. SHE WANTS TO LIVE WELL WITH LOTS OF MONEY. ON THE OTHER HAND, ARTHUR DOES THE SAME, FEELING HE CANNOT MARRY HIS LOVE SINCE HE HAS NO MONEY. THE EFFECT THAT MONEY OR THE LACK THEREOF HAS ON THESE 4 PEOPLE AND THE OTHER CHARACTERS IN THE STORY IS THE CENTRAL THEME. THE BOOK IS SO BEAUTIFULLY WRITTEN AND EXAMINES DEEPLY THE PSYCHE OF ALL THE CHARACTERS. I LOVED IT! ... Read more


9. Ralph the Heir
by Anthony, 1815-1882 Trollope
Kindle Edition: Pages (2010-06-12)
list price: US$4.95
Asin: B003RISN7O
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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"There are men who cannot communicate themselves to others, as there are also men who not only can do so, but cannot do otherwise. And it is hard to say which is the better man of the two. We do not specially respect him who wears his heart upon his sleeve for daws to peck at, who carries a crystal window to his bosom so that all can see the work that is going on within it, who cannot keep any affair of his own private, who gushes out in love and friendship to every chance acquaintance; but then, again, there is but little love given to him who is always wary, always silent as to his own belongings, who buttons himself in a suit of close reserve which he never loosens. Respect such a one may gain, but hardly love. It is natural to us to like to know the affairs of our friends; and natural also, I think, to like to talk of our own to those whom we trust. Perhaps, after all that may be said of the weakness of the gushing and indiscreet babbler, it is pleasanter to live with such a one than with the self-constrained reticent man of iron, whose conversation among his most intimate friends is solely of politics, of science, of literature, or of some other subject equally outside the privacies of our inner life.

Sir Thomas Underwood, whom I, and I hope my readers also, will have to know very intimately, was one of those who are not able to make themselves known intimately to any. I am speaking now of a man of sixty, and I am speaking also of one who had never yet made a close friend,-who had never by unconscious and slow degrees of affection fallen into that kind of intimacy with another man which justifies and renders necessary mutual freedom of intercourse in all the affairs of life. And yet he was possessed of warm affections, was by no means misanthropic in his nature, and would, in truth, have given much to be able to be free and jocund as are other men. He lacked the power that way, rather than the will. To himself it seemed to be a weakness in him rather than a strength that he should always be silent, always guarded, always secret and dark. He had lamented it as an acknowledged infirmity;-as a man grieves that he should be short-sighted, or dull of hearing; but at the age of sixty he had taken no efficient steps towards curing himself of the evil, and had now abandoned all idea of any such cure."

... Read more

Customer Reviews (3)

4-0 out of 5 stars Late Trollop
The laws on entail prevent Squire Newton from leaving his estate to hisillegitimate son Ralph. The rightful heir is the squire's nephew, also Ralph, a charming but callous young man whose only talent is accumulating debt. Can the squire circumvent the law and leave the property to Ralph the noble rather than to Ralph the wastrel? This is late Trollope and contains some of his best writing.The secondary characters are superb, especially Ontario Moggs, Friend of the Working Class, and Mr. Neefit, who is determined at almost any cost to see his daughter Polly a "lady". The political chapters are among Trollope's best writing, far superior to the politics described in his earlier Palliser novels.Much of the novel is a convincing portrait of empty-headed, time-wasting Ralph, who as Trollope points out is a rather odd choice for "hero".There is also a fascinating gallery of rogues with whom Ralphs hangs out. The problem with this novel is that the good, genteel heroines -- Patience, Clarissa, Mary-- are lifeless and boring. As Trollope says, men may act but women must "sit and wait".Unfortunately noble women sitting and thinking noble thoughts and waiting for something good to happen, makes for less than exciting reading.By contrast, Polly Neefit shows considerable good sense, courage, pluck, but she is a tradesman's daughter, not a lady and therefore need not be genteel. A great read, but move quickly through the dry patches.

5-0 out of 5 stars Trollope Fan
It took several years, but I have read ALL of the novels by Anthony Trollope (plus two biographies).Some books were from the library and some were purchased.After Jane Austen, Trollope is my favorite author.

5-0 out of 5 stars Trollope shines as portraitist, moralist, amiable cynic
Ralph The Heir, written late in Antony Trollope's life, is not as wellknown as his Palliser or Barchester novels, and this is a great shame.Tomy mind his talents are on display here in all their mature glory; hispenetrating observation of human motive and weakness, combined with araucous, convaluted storyline and a wicked sense of humor.Trollope knowspeople through and through, and it is no small thing that he refuses hereto make even his villain a monster.In true Trollope form, Ralph whois the heir (there are two Ralphs and two heirs) is in embarrasedcircumstances.Having spent a rather idle life waiting for his uncle todie so that he might inherit (and with the old squire hale at sixty, thiswill not likely happen soon), Ralph finds himself in debt up to hiseyeballs...or perhaps his hand-tooled hunting boots.With a stable ofhunters and a fierce riding breeches habit, Ralph must do something, butwhat?Just what Ralph does, and how it touches the whole pantheonwithin his circle (and a few decidedly outside it!) gently underlinesTrollope's deep concerns for his time: just what is a gentleman? What,indeed, is nobility in man and woman?And how are we so often willfullyblinkered by love, loyalty, ambition, and hate?There are severalstorylines in Ralph The Heir, and the author does not disappoint those whodelight in watching him tie all these delicious tales together in almostSeinfeldian fashion.Parliament figures prominently and the election (orrather the attempt at an election) of a principal character is somarvelously portrayed, so wicked, it alone is worth the price of the book. Trollope is a gem.Gentle, kindly in his characters, he truly lovespeople and when he laughs at them, I rather think he is laughing also athimself.Enjoy this; it's one of Trollope's best. ... Read more


10. Thackeray
by Anthony (1815-1882) Trollope
 Hardcover: Pages (2222)

Asin: B003TT17RY
Average Customer Review: 1.0 out of 5 stars
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Customer Reviews (1)

1-0 out of 5 stars Thackeray bio by equally great contemporary
Great idea but no quality control for printing this paperback. So far off-center rendered it
unreadable. ... Read more


11. He knew he was right, by Anthony Trollope; with sixty-four illustrations by Marcus Stone ... - [Complete in two volumes]
by Anthony (1815-1882) Trollope
 Hardcover: Pages (1869-01-01)

Asin: B0014NDRCK
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12. An editors tales / Anthony Trollope
by Anthony (1815-1882) Trollope
 Hardcover: Pages (1870-01-01)

Asin: B000MY5UTA
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13. An editorÃ?¯Ã'¿Ã'½s tales / Anthony Trollope
by Anthony (1815-1882) Trollope
 Hardcover: Pages (1870)

Asin: B002B8FI5Q
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14. Thackeray ; edited by John Morley
by Anthony (1815-1882) Trollope
 Hardcover: Pages (1882-01-01)

Asin: B001KUPQGC
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15. The WEST INDIES And The SPANISH MAIN.
by Anthony [1815 - 1882]. Trollope
 Hardcover: Pages (1860-01-01)

Asin: B000UEA9OI
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16. RALPH The HEIR. A Novel.
by Anthony [1815 - 1882]. Trollope
 Hardcover: Pages (1871-01-01)

Asin: B000MYXHEA
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17. The WARDEN. An Introduction by Angela Thirkell.
by Angela].[Kredel, Fritz].Trollope, Anthony [1815 - 1882]. [Thirkell
 Hardcover: Pages (1955)

Asin: B000MZ51A2
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18. The LIFE Of CICERO.
by Anthony [1815 - 1882]. Trollope
 Hardcover: Pages (1880)

Asin: B000MYQ6MU
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19. The THREE CLERKS. A Novel.
by Anthony [1815 - 1882]. Trollope
 Hardcover: Pages (1860)

Asin: B002JDW09A
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20. Dr. Wortle's School
by Anthony, 1815-1882 Trollope
Kindle Edition: Pages (2010-06-14)
list price: US$4.95
Asin: B003RRYB2G
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From Content:

"The Rev. Jeffrey Wortle, D.D., was a man much esteemed by others and by himself. He combined two professions, in both of which he had been successful had been, and continued to be, at the time in which we speak of him. I will introduce him to the reader in the present tense as Rector of Bowick, and proprietor and head-master of the school established in the village of that name. The seminary at Bowick had for some time enjoyed a reputation under him not that he had ever himself used so new-fangled and unpalatable a word in speaking of his school. Bowick School had been established by himself as preparatory to Eton. Dr. Wortle had been elected to an assistant-mastership at Eton early in life soon after he had become a Fellow of Exeter. There he had worked successfully for ten years, and had then retired to the living of Bowick. On going there he had determined to occupy his leisure, and if possible to make his fortune, by taking a few boys into his house. By dint of charging high prices and giving good food perhaps in part, also, by the quality of the education which he imparted his establishment had become popular and had outgrown the capacity of the parsonage. He had been enabled to purchase a field or two close abutting on the glebe gardens, and had there built convenient premises. He now limited his number to thirty boys, for each of which he charged -200 a-year. It was said of him by his friends that if he would only raise his price to -250, he might double the number, and really make a fortune. In answer to this, he told his friends that he knew his own business best he declared that his charge was the only sum that was compatible both with regard to himself and honesty to his customers, and asserted that the labours he endured were already quite heavy enough. In fact, he recommended all those who gave him advice to mind their own business.

It may be said of him that he knew his own so well as to justify him in repudiating counsel from others. There are very different ideas of what "a fortune" may be supposed to consist. It will not be necessary to give Dr. Wortle's exact idea. No doubt it changed with him, increasing as his money increased. But he was supposed to be a comfortable man. He paid ready money and high prices. He liked that people under him should thrive and he liked them to know that they throve by his means. He liked to be master, and always was. He was just, and liked his justice to be recognised. He was generous also, and liked that, too, to be known. He kept a carriage for his wife, who had been the daughter of a poor clergyman at Windsor, and was proud to see her as well dressed as the wife of any county squire. But he was a domineering husband. As his wife worshipped him, and regarded him as a Jupiter on earth from whose nod there could be and should be no appeal, but little harm came from this. If a tyrant, he was an affectionate tyrant. His wife felt him to be so. His servants, his parish, and his school all felt him to be so. They obeyed him, loved him, and believed in him."

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