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$24.90
21. A History of Christianity in the
$12.95
22. United States Classic Wall Map
 
$42.88
23. Race, Class, and Gender in the
$45.37
24. A Monetary History of the United
$6.70
25. The United States Constitution:
$3.99
26. The United States of Atlantis
27. The Naval War of 1812 Or the History
$16.99
28. United States Executive Poster
$5.77
29. The Constitution of the United
$7.90
30. A Young People's History of the
$15.50
31. The Oxford Companion to United
$33.99
32. Christian Life and Character of
$5.14
33. The Constitution of the United
$9.50
34. A Young People's History of the
$14.00
35. Grand Expectations: The United
$10.27
36. A Guide Book of United States
$12.61
37. History of the United States
$101.80
38. Health Policymaking in the United
$12.16
39. National Geographic Guide to the
$15.42
40. National Geographic Guide to the

21. A History of Christianity in the United States and Canada
by Mark A. Noll
Paperback: 592 Pages (1992-08)
list price: US$50.00 -- used & new: US$24.90
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0802806511
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
Author Mark Noll presents the unfolding drama of American Christianity with accuracy and skill, from the first European settlements to ecumenism in the late 20th Century. This work has become a standard in the field of North American religious history. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (8)

5-0 out of 5 stars History of Christianity in America
During the past decades a Wheaton College professor, Mark Noll, emerged as one of the nation's finest evangelical church historians.He's confirmed that standing with the recent publication of A History of Christianity in the United States and Canada (Grand Rapids:William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, c. 1992), a readable, up-to-date survey, a textbook which should enjoy a wider audience than the colleges and seminaries which offer courses on American church history.
Noll tells an important story, a story largely untold in the typical textbooks used in high schools and colleges in America--where more space is sometimes devoted to Native American religious practices than to Christian communities, where the Pilgrims and Puritans may be mentioned without a word concerning their religious faith and godly concerns.Just as the millions of church-going Americans rarely appear in today's media, so earlier church-goers rarely appear on the pages of authorized school textbooks.Censorship is alive and well in academia!But Christians, at least, should know some truths about their heritage.For. unfortunately, when they're told about this nation's religious background in church they're too often fed some patriotic pablum, filled with ideologically-fueled examples which distort the historical record.Just as academic historians err by omitting the truth, Christian propagandists (seeking to make this nation a thoroughly "Christian" nation) err by over-stating it.True, the United States is, in some ways, a "Christian" country.But, truth to tell, in perhaps more ways, the United States has failed to really be Christian.To get at the real story, we need historians like Noll to clear the record!
Noll divides his study, the "plot" of which follows "the rise and decline of Protestant dominance in the United States" (p. 4) into five parts:1) "Beginnings"--seventeenth century transplants ofEuropean churches; 2) "Americanization"--the eighteenth century emergence of a distinctively American church, shaped by the Great Awakening and War for Independence; 3) The "Protestant Century"--the nineteenth century, distinguished by the Second Great Awakening's evangelicalism; 4) The "Emergence of Religious Pluralism"--late nineteenth and early twentieth century developments responding to immigration, industrialism, and intellectual challenges such as Darwinism and biblical criticism; and 5) "Wilderness Once Again?"--the turbulent twentieth century's dislocating impact on a Protestant hegemony which seemed secure a century ago.
Each chapter begins with a religious song of the era to be considered--a nice touch which gives one a feeling for the period.The author (with his publisher's assistance) includes ample pictures, maps, etc., which add to the book's readability and comprehension.Brief bibliographical entries at the end of each chapter point to the latest research available to scholars.For years I've used Ahlstrom's monumental study in my course on American Christianity, but it's now dated and is always something of a hurdle (1000 pages!) for students.Noll's new book would now be my choice for that course.


5-0 out of 5 stars still enjoying the book
ok, I'm a slow reader. I also tend to read 3 books at a time. I checked this out at my local library and wanted a copy of it. It seems to be very well written and i am very interested in the early history of the United states (cause college sure didn't teach this stuff!).

5-0 out of 5 stars How religion in America escaped state control
This excellent, detailed history shows what was new about Christianity in the New World. It portrays the dramatic contrasts between official colonial churches and various refugee sects, with their different visions of how they might relate to each other. Where the first colonies, provinces or states usually had official state churches, Noll documents the issues of church relations on the borders or frontiers between these domains. Into these zones, dissidents of all stripes fled from state-backed religion. And in areas where no religious group had a majority, Noll records how people learned to meet their community needs and get along: "The result was a degree of interdenominational tolerance probably unknown anywhere else in the world at that time". (p. 89) Noll's statement may overlook the religious diversity of India or China, but for the Christian world it applied.

Of course Noll's book holds far more, and is of interest to people of every denomination in Canada and the USA. I was just most impressed by the explanation of how religion in North America escaped state control.

-author of Correcting Jesus

5-0 out of 5 stars A History of Christianity in the United States and Canada
This is a very good book for Church History. It is a single volume that is written on a fairly east-to-read level. If you've not read a Church History reference before, this would be a good choice with which to start.

Mark Noll's works are always good.

5-0 out of 5 stars History in America - The Religious History
This book helps us to remember the Christian Heritage of our country. By studying the Christian Heritage of our country we can see how the secular history has played out too and how they go hand in hand. This book by Mark A. Noll helps to bring this rich history in an easy to read format. This book is also a great resource for research and to help with illustrations for sermons and Sunday School lessons. ... Read more


22. United States Classic Wall Map (tubed)
by National Geographic Maps
Map: Pages (2008-01-01)
list price: US$16.99 -- used & new: US$12.95
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0792293185
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
Our most popular United States wall map. Features all 50 States with insets for Alaska and Hawaii. All major cities, transportation routes, State boundaries, National Parks, inland waterways, and mountain ranges are clearly displayed and labeled.
Scale size: 1:4,560,000
Tubed 30'' x 43'' ... Read more

Customer Reviews (2)

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Map of the U.S.
If your looking for a great looking, detailed, interesting U.S. map at just the right size then this map would be perfect for you. It's not too large yet includes many cities/towns in all states either well-known or not. It works out well for me becuase I find it fun to put small push pins in all the different cities I visited all around the country. The map also makes room for parts of Canada and Mexico. The key is very helpful and creative and the map also shows some of the more mountainous regions of the U.S. I have it hanging up right above my bed and I love just exploring the map and the states every night before I go to bed.

5-0 out of 5 stars US map, just what I wanted
I have a world map that I place markers of the places I have been and where I want to go next.I have traveled widely in the US and will frame this map and do the same.I love to travel and this will help me plan future trips and remember wonderful past trips. ... Read more


23. Race, Class, and Gender in the United States: An Integrated Study, Eighth edition
by Paula S. Rothenberg
 Paperback: 774 Pages (2009-09-11)
-- used & new: US$42.88
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 142921788X
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description

Regarded as the best reader of its kind, Race, Class, and Gender in the United States: An Integrated Study invites students to think critically about complex issues of race, gender, and sexuality. Rothenberg deftly and consistently helps students analyze each phenomenon, as well as the relationships among them, thereby deepening their understanding of each issue. The result is a reader at home in any number of classes.
... Read more

Customer Reviews (19)

5-0 out of 5 stars A realistic, approachable collection
In terms of readers or anthologies, Paula S. Rothenberg offers one of the most accessible compilations of articles focusing on race, class, and gender that I have yet to encounter.Rothenberg provides a varied selection of readings that reveal the comprehensive state of discrimination and oppression within the United States. "Race, Class, and Gender in the United States" works within an academic context, but it's also avaluable addition to any professional's bookshelf.

I used "Race, Class, and Gender in the United States" for a recent class onRacism and Sexism and I found myself spending a considerable amount of time exploring articles outside of those assigned.The articles integrate with one another quite well and they provide a variety of perspectives.Perhaps the most valuable part of Rothenberg's compilation is its ability to simultaneously provide the historic framework of oppression while providing a cross-section of how concepts of race, class, and gender play out in today's society.

I would strongly recommend this book to anyone looking to expand their knowledge of the societal and cultural implications held within race, class, and gender in the United States.Rothenberg provides an abundance of readings within its voluminous 700+ pages.I enjoyed the fact that Rothenberg provided a realistic selection of readings without reveling in overly academic texts.

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent!!
Received my package a day before it was suppose to come :). Was in excellent condition. Great service, and good price.

4-0 out of 5 stars informative, and interesting.
This book was a great read over the semester. Its rare where you find a book youll read for leisure even when its a text book. if your class requires this book good for you.

1-0 out of 5 stars unhappy, mislead
The book was actually the 7th edition, not the 8th. The seller notified me of that after I made the purchase, but before it was shipped. At that point, I was desperate because time was running out to receive the book in time for my course. I took the book for that reason,only, but wasn't very happy about the situation. I feel like I was treated unfairly because I paid too much for an outdated book.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Book
I had to buy this for a class.It is definitely the best textbook I've ever purchased. A textbook that really makes you think.I will keep it and refer to it in the future.I think it should be required reading for everyone. ... Read more


24. A Monetary History of the United States, 1867-1960
by Milton Friedman, Anna Jacobson Schwartz
Paperback: 888 Pages (1971-11-01)
list price: US$60.00 -- used & new: US$45.37
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0691003548
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description

Writing in the June 1965 issue of theEconomic Journal, Harry G. Johnson begins with a sentence seemingly calibrated to the scale of the book he set himself to review: "The long-awaited monetary history of the United States by Friedman and Schwartz is in every sense of the term a monumental scholarly achievement--monumental in its sheer bulk, monumental in the definitiveness of its treatment of innumerable issues, large and small . . . monumental, above all, in the theoretical and statistical effort and ingenuity that have been brought to bear on the solution of complex and subtle economic issues."

Friedman and Schwartz marshaled massive historical data and sharp analytics to support the claim that monetary policy--steady control of the money supply--matters profoundly in the management of the nation's economy, especially in navigating serious economic fluctuations. In their influential chapter 7, The Great Contraction--which Princeton published in 1965 as a separate paperback--they address the central economic event of the century, the Depression. According to Hugh Rockoff, writing in January 1965: "If Great Depressions could be prevented through timely actions by the monetary authority (or by a monetary rule), as Friedman and Schwartz had contended, then the case for market economies was measurably stronger."

Milton Friedman won the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2000 for work related to A Monetary History as well as to his other Princeton University Press book, A Theory of the Consumption Function (1957).

... Read more

Customer Reviews (13)

4-0 out of 5 stars Interesting, well researched and informative
A departure from other Friedman books this is truly a historical walk down 100 years. Not too much commentary about whether Friedman agrees/disagrees with monetary policy but it's so well researched you can't help but get caught up in the historical significance of monetary policy.. and boy does history ever repeat itself. Not for the faint at heart, this book is for the serious economic student.

4-0 out of 5 stars Revolutionary, albeit flawed, Monetary Analysis
"A Monetary History of the United States, 1867-1960" by Milton Friedman and Anna Schwartz is an epic in economic literature.The authors concisely analyze nearly 100 years of monetary history and prove why monetary economics matter.Their work, originally published in 1963, offers immaculate insight into endogenous and exogenous economic variables that shaped US history.

When reviewing a classic text it is important to test it on two criteria: 1) it's ingenuity; and, 2) it's validity.In regards to ingenuity "Monetary History" paved the way towards a statistically grounded analysis of macroeconomics (in this case monetary theory).While "Monetary History" was groundbreaking it's truly memorable aspect is Ch7's "The Great Contraction".This chapter, which is now known as the money hypothesis, revolutionized the way economists thought about the Great

Deprhttp://www.amazon.com/review/R1C118WNLAM4I/ref=cm_cr_pr_cmt?ie=UTF8&ASIN=0691137943&nodeID=#wasThisHelpfulession.Ultimately, this analysis proved to be incorrect.

Why the work remains a classic, even though flawed, is because the sheer difficulty in producing such a feat.Friedman and Schwartz managed to put together a comprehensive 100 year monetary history in (a short) 700 pages.The amount of research required to take on such a project is hard to grasp.The footnotesin the "Monetary History" give a small glimpse into how much work was required to create this book.They alone are the size of a mid-sized economic text.Throughout the text the authors synthesis a wide range of evidence, often being forced to recalculate the statistics given to them, and somehow come out with a fairly consistent history.

The work is so encompassing it is impossible in an Amazon book review to point out all of the prescient ideas presented in a "Monetary History".Here is a short list off the top of my head: 1) money matters in the short-run; 2) active gov't policy can prevent bank panics if correctly implemented; 3) Consistent misperception regarding economics have OFTEN created bad policy (both in the private and public sphere);4) the gold standard was never good (and we never had anything near an ACTUAL gold standard);5) An excellent review of business cycle contractions between 1844-1960; 6)Everything you wanted to know about the composition of banking mechanisms from 1867-1960.There are many, many more...

Friedman's "Monetary History" analysis does occasionally feel awkward (this tends to happen when his quantitative analysis does not account for history and he is forced to make qualitative assumptions).1) The entire Great Contraction rested on the qualitative factor of not having a 'Great Man' running the Federal Reserve; 2) Deflation existed side by side with rapid economic expansion in the 1880's, which Friedman finds interesting, but no attempt is made to ascertain whether monetary issues had any recessionary effects on potential growth; 3) The entire 48-60' analysis exerts a strong ideological stance that did not seem to exist in the earlier chapters.(many more minor hiccups exist and for the most part Friedman is willing to admit when he cannot reasonably prove causation).

However, two major problems exist in the "Monetary History".

1) The assumption that money does not matter in the long-run is unsupported through their analysis.Friedman and Schwartz fail to find any long lasting effectsregarding changes in the price level and money stock to changes in economic activity.This view, which is a very simple look at correlations, is essentially embracing a negation.They fail to find a connection between monetary economics and business cycles so it must not exist.Though this view has little empirical evidence it is made several times throughout the work (and in almost every case the statement seems to be completely out of place).The claim that money is 'neutral' has forever changed economics by being included in the Neoclassical Synthesis.

2) Friedman's chapter on the velocity of money is by far the weakest part of his text.After going on for ~700 pages with precise attention to quantitative analysis Friedman is forced to argue, in a mere 3 pages, that changes in velocity must be due to rational expectations (with little empirical evidence).Friedman's assumption that Velocity exhibits a secular decline with rising income is CRUCIAL when analyzing Monetarism.The Quantity Theory of Money states: Money*Velocity=Price*Output --- M*V=P*Y (this is a rearrangement of Fisher's equation -- See Michael Emmett Bradely's review for a far superior theoretical analysis of this equation).If Velocity can be considered constant then changes in M = changes in P*Y.This means all that is needed to have stable business cycles is an unchanging, or better yet a slightly increasing, money supply.HOWEVER, this flawed assumption is why Monetarism is so difficult to implement into policy. Friedman's tentative assumption in his "Monetary History" became the dogma of Monetarism.

"A Monetary History of the US, 1867-1960" is a revolutionary, albeit flawed, canon in economic literature.

5-0 out of 5 stars study / interested in econ / political economy ? -- must read !


do not have more to say than the header ..... basically :-) (it's more of "working oneself through" than "reading over", or while doing something else at the same time but it is very much worth it and it sets the record straight on many fallacies still heard/told about the great depression)

5-0 out of 5 stars An Eye-Opening Revelation
Myths, misconceptions, and wishful thinking pervade the study of US history. Economic history has been especially prone to revisionists who twist and distort facts, or who fabricate lies outright. This is perhaps most evident in the Great Depression, as many blame the "do nothing" policies of Herbert Hoover and champion FDR's New Deal. These individuals would be truly enlightened by Friedman's Monetary History, which sheds light on the true nature of the Great Depression. Friedman convincingly argues that both Hoover and Roosevelt prolonged the Depression with inflationary policies.A useful text for anyone interested in reason, truth, and economics.

4-0 out of 5 stars Break from the norm.
This is perhaps the best work if you are simply looking for examples of how government intervention can cause harm instead of good. Additionally, this has been the work that pushed the recognition of monetarism into the heat of the economic mindset.

This being said, it is important to note that the theory underlying this endeavor is not an ample explanation of the Great Depression as it is conventionally used. The bottom line is that there are simply far too many exogenous and endogenous factors that operate regardless of what or what not government policy may influence. Additionally, the compilation of data and analyses from financial markets over the years shows with clarity that Friedman's general framework is a very special exception, not a rule. Read Michael Emmett Brady's review, as he seems to touch on this more.

Ultimately, the conclusion, in my opinion, is not worth the effort. Everyone long understood, if perhaps not the extent, the potential for intervention through misguided fiscal or monetary policy to cause harm. Friedman's methodology is far too ideologically tempered to continue to be taken seriously. However, the compilation of statistical data alone make this a necessary purchase for anyone serious about (ironically) economic history in the United States. It is (Edit - was) also a highly original analysis of depression economics, for those interested. Even with the truckload of ideology and faulty, sometimes absurd, assumptions taken to build a logical framework, this book is worth reading simply because of its influence on economics as a discipline. The main question is its relevance.

Conclusion - Buy this for compiled data and statistics, and to understand the thinking that has had huge effect, if not for quite a while dominated, mainstream economics. Leave the ideology at the door. ... Read more


25. The United States Constitution: A Graphic Adaptation
by Jonathan Hennessey
Paperback: 160 Pages (2008-10-14)
list price: US$16.95 -- used & new: US$6.70
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0809094703
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Product Description

Our leaders swear to uphold it, our military to defend it. It is the blueprint for the shape and function of government itself and what defines Americans as Americans. But how many of us truly know our Constitution?

The United States Constitution: A Graphic Adaptation uses the art of illustrated storytelling to breathe life into our nation’s cornerstone principles. Simply put, it is the most enjoyable and groundbreaking way to read the governing document of the United States. Spirited and visually witty, it roves article by article, amendment by amendment, to get at the meaning, background, and enduring relevance of the law of the land.

What revolutionary ideas made the Constitution’s authors dare to cast off centuries of rule by kings and queens? Why do we have an electoral college rather than a popular vote for president and vice president? How did a document that once sanctioned slavery, denied voting rights to women, and turned a blind eye to state governments running roughshod over the liberties of minorities transform into a bulwark of protection for all?

The United States Constitution answers all of these questions. Sure to surprise, challenge, and provoke, it is hands down the most memorable introduction to America’s founding document.

Amazon.com Review

Take a look at the Constitution as you've never seen it before in The United States Constitution: A Graphic Adaptation.Writer Jonathan Hennessey and illustrator Aaron McConnell describe the creation of Article I with vibrant, detailed graphics and captions that aresurprisingly informative. Each image below links to a larger view of the page [PDF].




... Read more

Customer Reviews (15)

3-0 out of 5 stars Review of Hennessey's Graphic Constitution
This is a great idea, but I don't feel it was put together as well as it should have. The graphic novel is bogged down by very odd visual metaphors for different constitutional powers. The book is great at whipping through constitutional history. Also, there is occasional old, 'constitution' style cursive presented to the reader, which is so small that even I had trouble with it.

4-0 out of 5 stars A supplement, not a replacement
I really enjoyed this and found the style helpful in understanding the points of the Constitution and its amendments. However, it was difficult at times to know what were actual quotes from the Constitution and what was paraphrasing.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great idea for a book!

This book, which is a comic book version the the American Constitution, includes the history behind the resulting document.I gave a copy of this to all the people on my Xmas list last year!The book is fun to read, and good to have around, as a particular article is discussed on the news. This is also a great book for 12 year old kids!5 stars!!!!

5-0 out of 5 stars The Balancing Act of All Time
In our modern punditocracy, fewer and fewer Americans understand how the Constitution truly works, especially those who hype it the loudest. While alternative education methods like graphic depictions still face criticism from skeptics, this book might just be what the doctor ordered for high school or college students whose civic knowledge has been polluted by a lifetime of uninformed political propaganda. Writer Jonathan Hennessy does a fine job explaining many of the Constitution's intricacies while busting a lot of myths, and manages to stay politically realistic while pointing out the American inequality that the Constitution has not always been able to conquer. Artist Aaron McConnell contributes fairly dramatic artwork that is clearly influenced by hard-hitting golden age pulp comics, and he uses a few very poignant tricks to point out America's not-so-noble past, such as drawing slaves as having three-fifths of full bodies.

The constitutional information imparted herein is robust and effective, but note that a largely procedural document like the Constitution does not always lead to smooth storytelling, so this book's narrative is a bit awkward and disconnected in places. But Hennessy and McConnell really make the Constitution come alive in ways that all readers can understand, and there will be some surprises in store for those who think they know what the great document is all about. That's already a better civics education than most Americans are getting these days. [~doomsdayer520~]

4-0 out of 5 stars Read this primer first
Hennessey and McConnell mix it up quite a bit to present the US Constitution - not only a summary of each article and ammendment, but the ideas behind them and often the historical settings in which they were formed.Often a brief history lesson is used to show what the particular concept was meant to address; other times, hypothetical examples are used.The graphics vary much the same way - sometimes a simple story is being told; other times, an abstract concept is presented in totally original symbols and sci-fi like images.

This is a very accessible approach to what would otherwise be a dry read.Though the text of the constitution itself is only partly quoted, the substance and explanations come across in a well balanced fashion.And, often, the changing interpretations over our history are presented as well, offering a vision of a Constitution that will continue to be re-interepreted and evolve.

A great way to get the meat of this critical document in world history into the mind of a middle- or high-school student.
... Read more


26. The United States of Atlantis
by Harry Turtledove
Hardcover: 448 Pages (2008-12-02)
list price: US$25.95 -- used & new: US$3.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B0028N72T4
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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England has driven the French from Atlantis, giving King George leave to tighten his control over the colonies. The Redcoats have seized the continent’s eastern coastal towns, depriving the Atlanteans of the markets where they sell their goods as part of a strategy to bend the colonists to their will.

Instead, England’s tactics have only strengthened the Atlanteans’ resolve to be free. As leader of the revolutionaries, Victor Radcliff will make the English pay for each and every piece of land they dare to occupy, and will stop at nothing to preserve the liberty of his people as a new nation is born—a nation that will change the face of the world. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (23)

5-0 out of 5 stars 2nd in Trilogy does not disappoint-can't wait for third
Turtledove picks up where he left off in Opening Atlantis (Opening Atlantis). Ok maybe it has been a few years since Victor Radcliff helped the British fight off the French, but now the Atlantis colonies are itching for a fight with the motherland. The parallels to the American Revolution are obvious, yet insightful. The characters familiar yet not perfect. It is Turtledove at his best developing people we may see again later.

I cannot wait for the third installment, Liberating Atlantis (Liberating Atlantis). It is not giving away too much by stating that it must be about an Atlantis civil war. Readers will remember that the first book had three sections, so for sometime I thought I had read all three books in this series. I am glad I realized my error and found United States of Atlantis.


Sam Hendricks, author of Fantasy Football Tips and Fantasy Football Basics

3-0 out of 5 stars This was a really boring novel.Disappointing.
I've been a huge fan of Turtledove, but I couldn't finish this book.The quality of his last several books have dropped dramatically. I was looking forward to this novel, but it never caught my attention. Characterizations are weak and I felt the story was rambling.Can't recomend this one.

1-0 out of 5 stars The Worst of Turtledove
This is the first time that I put down a Harry Turtledove book.Usually I can't stop reading and finish in the first day or two, but this one I didn't even plan to finish, except that I ended up on an airplane and slogged through to the end.

No one who grew up in the United States needs to bother reading this book, as "The United States of Atlantis" have the same history as the United States of America.This is basically a re-packaging of the American Revolution, with characters exactly mirroring those in real history.Like George Washington, Victor Radcliffe is the reluctant leader, upon whom greatness is thrust.There is a Benedict Arnold-esque traitor who goes over to the British.There is someone in France, impressing the court with his rustic charm a la Benjamin Franklin.There is even a Jewish guy somewhere funding the revolution.

Usually I like when Turtledove explains every detail of the military campaigns and goes into detail explaining the winning strategies.This time I was bored because of how similar it was to things I already learned way back when in 11th grade.

I would give it no stars if I could.

5-0 out of 5 stars The United States of Atlantis
Harry Turtledove does an interesting twist on American history. This is the second book of a trilogy and can be read as a stand alone but is much more interesting when read in order.

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Serivce!
The book arrived ahead of schedule and in excellent condition. I would definitely but from this seller in the future. ... Read more


27. The Naval War of 1812 Or the History of the United States Navy during the Last War with Great Britain to Which Is Appended an Account of the Battle of New Orleans
by Theodore Roosevelt
Kindle Edition: Pages (2009-10-04)
list price: US$1.99
Asin: B002RKS238
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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Product Description
This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (1)

4-0 out of 5 stars Very solid, Kindle version is lacking
An excellent book.T.R. knows how to keep your interest.

Well researched, lots of information about the crews, weapons and ships.

I wish he had left out the land portion (seems unnecessary).

Interesting to see how much he was trying to make a point about the condition of the US Navy in 1882.

Some definite issues in formatting with the free Kindle version.The absence of the illustrations is noticeable.

Also, if you are Italian or Indian, T.R. didn't think highly of you as a sailor - so be warned on that one. ... Read more


28. United States Executive Poster Size Wall Map (tubed)
by National Geographic Maps
Map: Pages (2009-01-01)
list price: US$16.99 -- used & new: US$16.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1597752207
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Product Description
Make a statement with this "2008 Premier Print Awards Winner." The rich tones of this Political Executive map combine the popular antique look with up-to-date information so that you have a map that is elegant enough for the board room, study, or office, and contemporary enough to make it an ideal reference.

Poster size 24'' x 36'' (tubed)
Scale size: 1:5,429,000 ... Read more

Customer Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Looking Map
Received this map very quick, Got it framed and Matted for my daughter and son in law for there home. I had a laminated so they could stick pins in the states they have been too. ... Read more


29. The Constitution of the United States of America, with the Bill of Rights and all of the Amendments; The Declaration of Independence; and the Articles of Confederation
by Thomas Jefferson, Second Continental Congress, Constitutional Convention
Paperback: 96 Pages (2010-02-10)
list price: US$7.94 -- used & new: US$5.77
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1441419500
Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
Collected here in one affordable volume are the most important documents of the United States of America: The Constitution of the United States of America, with the Bill of Rights and all of the Amendments; The Declaration of Independence; and the Articles of Confederation. These three documents are the basis for our entire way of life. Every citizen should have a copy. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (261)

5-0 out of 5 stars must read
Must read,once you are informed you will be motivated to defend it,and to understand the threats to our nation,past ,present and future.

1-0 out of 5 stars We do not need a disclaimer on our Constitution!
Wilder Publications should be ashamed of themselves.A disclaimer on our Constitution?Thankfully, they have a Constitutional right to be speak "stupid". Buy your copy from some other publisher.

5-0 out of 5 stars wisdom
must read for all citizens....especially the president...legislating judges....congress members who have forgotten who they serve...

5-0 out of 5 stars Book with Constitution and Related Documents
This book is exactly what I had been hoping for.It contains the pertinent documents without any opinion pieces.Perfect!

2-0 out of 5 stars Just wanted what the title implies
Most people that intend to purchase this product are already indoctrinated in its purpose and ideas. However, it is nice to have a copy for the finer details and any discussion that may come up. Unfortunately, I purchased this pamphlet before reading the reviews. Even if I had, I would not have believed them. All it took was one glance to realize that instead of what I purchased I received more opinions than substance. Shame on me. Do not make the same mistake and purchase this propagandist gobbledygook. ... Read more


30. A Young People's History of the United States, Vol. 1: Columbus to the Spanish-American War
by Howard Zinn
Hardcover: 224 Pages (2007-05-01)
list price: US$16.95 -- used & new: US$7.90
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1583227598
Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

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Praise for A People’s History of the United States:

“Professor Zinn writes with an enthusiasm rarely encountered in the leaden prose of academic history, and his text is studded with telling quotations from labor leaders, war resisters and fugitive slaves. There are vivid descriptions of events that are usually ignored.”—Eric Foner, The New York Times Book Review

Howard Zinn’s first book for young adults is a retelling of US history from the viewpoints of slaves, workers, immigrants, women, and Native Americans with color images, a glossary, and primary sources. Volume one begins with a look at Christopher Columbus’ arrival through the eyes of the Arawak Indians and leads the reader through the strikes and rebellions of the industrial age.

Young People's History of the US

... Read more

Customer Reviews (5)

1-0 out of 5 stars Can't Believe in Him Anymore
After reading that Howard Zinn does not think it is important to investigate 9/11, I will have nothing more to do with him. I don't care how renowned he is. If he doesn't think it's important to stop the false flag operations that have gone on for many, many decades that have thrust us into wars that were instigated by interested 3rd party investors to cash in on the vast fortunes made when they finance both sides of a war, then he will get no support from me. Wake up people! Aren't you tired of being played like a puppet on a string. Watch "JFKII: The Bush Connection" and "Empire of the City: Ring of Power" on YouTube.

[...]

1-0 out of 5 stars A biased and inaccurate history
This book presents a biased and inaccurate history of the US. In Zinn's eyes America is the source of evil in the world. This is historical revisionism and political correctness at its worst. Instead of this, I would recommend "A Patriot's History of the United States" by Schweikart.

5-0 out of 5 stars A true history of the "people."
For so many groups of people who never got a chance to see themselves in history textbooks, Zinn's A Young People's History is a gem. Far from being "leftist" or "radical," his book tells this nation that it is ok to confront the less-than-humane paths America has taken on its quest for world recognition.

4-0 out of 5 stars A Nice Primer
This book and its companion Volume 2 are the perfect introduction to US history.Based on Zinn's larger work, this focuses on a younger audience.It is informative and provides prospective that is different than the material taught in schools.Every child in the US should read these books.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Work and Much Needed
As with all of Mr. Zinn's works, this series is clearly written and thorough. Mr. Zinn's writing is very readable, it is always reminiscent of his own pace and phrasing as he speaks. I had been hoping for something like this for a long time. I have given away quite a few copies of The People's History of the United States, but was at a loss for what to do for younger readers. It was proposed by a friend that these books are so constructed and easy to read and understand that maybe even one of the still-confused right-wing supporters might be able to finally get it. In the U.S.A. all most people get is a highly inaccurate and mythologized public school American History education. It is no wonder that they fall victim to Fox news and the propaganda machine of the present regime. They have no frame of reference to weigh facts and spin. They might even actually believe that "They hate us for our "freedoms" and other laughable sound bites. Events do not occur in a vacuum. Truthful history is all we have to clarify and help us learn to prevent the mistakes of the past. The young are our hope so they must be informed. ... Read more


31. The Oxford Companion to United States History (Oxford Companions)
Hardcover: 984 Pages (2001-07-04)
list price: US$79.95 -- used & new: US$15.50
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0195082095
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

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Here is a volume that is as big and as varied as the nation it portrays. With over 1,400 entries written by some 900 historians and other scholars, it illuminates not only America's political, diplomatic, and military history, but also social, cultural, and intellectual trends; science, technology, and medicine; the arts; and religion.
Here are the familiar political heroes, from George Washington and Benjamin Franklin, to Abraham Lincoln, Woodrow Wilson, and Franklin D. Roosevelt. But here, too, are scientists, writers, radicals, sports figures, and religious leaders, with incisive portraits of such varied individuals as Thomas Edison and Eli Whitney, Babe Ruth and Muhammed Ali, Black Elk and Crazy Horse, Margaret Fuller, Emma Goldman, and Marian Anderson, even Al Capone and Jesse James. The Companion illuminates events that have shaped the nation (the Great Awakening, Bunker Hill, Wounded Knee, the Vietnam War); major Supreme Court decisions (Marbury v. Madison, Roe v. Wade); landmark legislation (the Fugitive Slave Law, the Pure Food and Drug Act); social movements (Suffrage, Civil Rights); influential books (The Jungle, Uncle Tom's Cabin); ideologies (conservatism, liberalism, Social Darwinism); even natural disasters and iconic sites (the Chicago Fire, the Johnstown Flood, Niagara Falls, the Lincoln Memorial).Here too is the nation's social and cultural history, from Films, Football, and the 4-H Club, to Immigration, Courtship and Dating, Marriage and Divorce, and Death and Dying. Extensive multi-part entries cover such key topics as the Civil War, Indian History and Culture, Slavery, and the Federal Government.
A new volume for a new century, The Oxford Companion to United States History covers everything from Jamestown and the Puritans to the Human Genome Project and the Internet--from Columbus to Clinton. Written in clear, graceful prose for researchers, browsers, and general readers alike, this is the volume that addresses the totality of the American experience, its triumphs and heroes as well as its tragedies and darker moments.Amazon.com Review
From abortion to "Babe" Didrikson Zaharias, Abrams vs. United States to the Zenger trial, and abstract impressionism to Dr. Marie Zakrzewska, TheOxford Companion to United States History is an encyclopedic overviewcovering the pre-Columbian era to the election of George W. Bush in 2000.

The Companion examines the notable men and women and major events inU.S. history, such as wars or the Depression, as well as ideas andideologies, technological innovations and economic developments, andlong-term processes such as immigration and urbanization. Each entry iswritten by an authority on the subject, thoroughly cross-referenced in the78-page index, and arranged alphabetically for easy reference. Thealphabetic organization makes for some strange (or amusing) combinations of people on the same page: Billy Graham and Martha Graham; "Mother" Jones and Michael Jordan; Persian Gulf War and Petroleum Industry; Income Tax, Federal, and Indentured Servitude.

A browser's delight, but full of solid scholarship, The Oxford Companionto United States History deserves the treatment its editorsrecommend--as "a work to be thumbed and worn out, not a book to be putbehind glass on a shelf!" Absolutely essential for the well-stocked historylibrary. --Sunny Delaney ... Read more

Customer Reviews (8)

4-0 out of 5 stars An intelligent guide, with Easton Press's gorgeous presentation
Easton has been printing gorgeous books for as long I as can remember. They work on the same old subscription method of "giving" you a low-priced "introductory" volume, after which Easton automatically enrolls you in their subscription list. "The Story of a Thousand Nights and a Night" (which the rest of us know as the story of the Princess Shaharazed) offers you the first volume at a low introductory price of $50 (if you watch TV, you can hardly avoid the ads), and then suddenly the remaining books are $64 dollars.

While I have always disapproved of this marketing scheme I also have to add that Easton Press publishes some of the most beautiful machine-made books in the world. The books are bound in full leather, with luxury abounding: all the page edges (as opposed to those who gild only the page tops) are covered with gilt, while the books come with sewn-in satin bookmarks, and include moiré silk front and end pages. Furthermore the spine (with four ridges) and front cover especially, display elaborate gilt tooling of exquisite designs. If all I wanted to do was sit and gaze upon beautiful books or even sit and read beautiful books, I would buy all Easton Press books without the slightest qualm.

Let's be clear, however, about one thing: price vs. value. Like beauty, value is in the eye (and hand) or the beholder, or, in this case, reader. And as both beholder and reader, I love these books. There is nothing like the feel of a fine book, and, except for a handmade version, Easton's books are about as good as they get. Would I buy them? If I had much more money, or wanted to build a beautiful private library (especially if I had young children and wanted them to learn the joys of a private library), absolutely. I do own some Easton Press books that I'm not selling at all.

The decrease in the number of private libraries is one of the tragedies of present-day life. When I was growing up, we (my family) had books everywhere. A number of them were Modern Library, much simpler hardback publications, many of which I have to this day. Easton Press employs the arts of high-end bookmaking that, unfortunately, most people never see.

Nor is the Easton content to be dismissed lightly. I was pleasantly surprised to find that they had included coverage of the trial of John Peter Zenger for sedition, libel, and treason. This 1734-1735 hallmark case is without doubt one of the most important trials in our national issue. A complicated and tangled case, with party politics mixed in with land ownership and subservience to the Tory government in Britain, at the time of the trial, the jury was instructed that to prove the charges, prosecution had merely to prove that the defendant had printed the passages at issue -- whether they be true or not. In America's first case of jury nullification, the jury acquitted Zenger becase what he had printed was true, and you cannot find a man guilty for telling the truth. The standard has stood the test of time and nearly all cases involving freedom of speech or freedom of the press, almost always do so by invoking the precedent of John Peter Zenger. As far as I'm concerned, that's reason enough to buy the book, even apart from the usual beauty of the book itself. For more information on the Zenger trial, select the following link: John Peter Zenger and Freedom of the Press copy, then paste it into the Amazon search window. This book is essentially an elaboration of the notes made by Livingston Rutherford, Zenger's attorney, as the trial progressed.

So, I admit, I'm partial to the book because it is just gorgeous and with proper handling will teach your children the value of great books, and because it covers one of my favorite subjects, one I consider to be the most important subject in American history. Now, having said that, I bow to other reviewers who complain about bias or deletions. After all, it's a truism that history is written by the winners. But if you want a beautiful book that covers at least the winners' view, this is certainly a gorgeous place to start. I hope you enjoy it.And then you then move on to more comprehensive views of American history, such as Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States: 1492 to Present (P.S.), A People's History of American Empire (American Empire Project), A Power Governments Cannot Suppress, or, Zinn's wonderful story of "SNCC: The New Abolitionists." Or, oh heck, anything by Howard Zinn. Warning: "Liberal content. Reader discretion advised. You might get influenced by an idea."

Happy reading.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great for browsing and reference
Most of the entries are detailed and informative, as well as fair and balanced, even on controversial subjects.The articles on "Protestantism" and "Revivalism" are excellent, befitting their distinguished authors, Martin Marty and Edith Blumhofer, respectively.(Unlike some dictionaries and encyclopedias, all entries are signed, instead of initialed or attributed to the staff and editors collectively.)
An occasional exception would be articles such as the hagiographic piece on "Margaret Sanger." At least its author is willing to include "Eugenics" as a cross reference.(Unfortunately, there is no reciprocal cross reference in the "Eugenics" entry.)
Sanger's work alongside the eugenics movement is whitewashed as a "pragmatic alliance." This is no more credible than a claim by liberal German Protestants that they emerged guiltless from WW II since their alliance with the Nazis was merely "pragmatic."In contrast, a true example of a pragmatic alliance from that era is the U.S. and Russia--we acted on different military fronts, and are not stained by the atrocities of Soviet commissars and the punishment regiments that raped and plundered eastern Germany.In contrast, Sanger and Planned Parenthood are forever linked with the abortion of lower class babies and children of color, whichcontinues unapologetically today.http://www.blackgenocide.org/sanger.html

4-0 out of 5 stars From abortion to the Zenger trial
From abortion to the Zenger trial.This massive book covers everything (or just about): the heroes, the tragedies, the darker moments, Presidents, inventors, wars, government, ideologies, movements, culture, entertainment, science, art, religion.There are 1,400 entries and some 900 historians.

While there are some questionable individuals and subjects inserted, others just as noteworthy are forgotten.It is of course a monumental undertaking; data will come up short periodically; should be complemented with other sources, such as "A Patriots Guide to US History".This treasure is in dictionary form: fairly written, convenient to use, and not dry.A reference that should be in all households.

Wish you well
Scott




4-0 out of 5 stars Companion Blunders on Sacco and Vanzetti
Editor in Chief Paul S. Boyer states in his Introduction (p. viii):"Still another central goal has been to make this a 'state of the art' work incorporating the best and most up-to-date historical scholarship.We have chosen contributors who are authorities on the subject which they write about, and who in many cases are themselves the authors of books and essays that have shaped contemporary understanding of the topics they write about."

The entry "SACCO AND VANZETTI CASE" in The Oxford Companion to United States History has factual errors.Why Lynn Dumenil was chosen over David Felix to write this entry is curious.Dumenil has no book on Sacco and Vanzetti.Felix's 1965 book, "Protest:Sacco-Vanzetti and the Intellectuals," received strong reviews.Keeping up to date on Sacco and Vanzetti, Felix rebuked Hugh Brogan, chair of the History Department at the University of Essex, in a letter to the TLS on May 31, 1985, p. 607.He rebuked Brogan a second time in a letter to the TLS on February 21, 1986, p. 191.Within the last eighteen months Felix has published two letters in the TLS, evidence that he is still in the intellectual arena and has continuing respect in the intellectual community.But Oxford University Press chose to ignore Felix.It is Dumenil and other scholars who have shaped opinion on Sacco and Vanzetti.Perhaps Paul S. Boyer will incorporate in the next edition of The Oxford Companion to United States History new evidence on Sacco and Vanzetti that was discovered at Dexter, Maine, in 2003 and new evidence that was discovered in The Sacco-Vanzetti Case Papers, microfilm Reel #21, in 2005.Authors of U. S. history textbooks have yet to publish this new evidence.

2-0 out of 5 stars Fails as a Guide to American History
Students and history buffs need a good, comprehensive volume on the significant people, events, movements and changes in the United States over the course of its history. This volume, from the leading publisher of reference books in the English language, fails and disappoints with regard to these goals. This Oxford Companion tries to be the United States History of Everything, as a result it misses key aspects of political history and what it does cover is often inadequate and incomplete.

The Companion tries to cover too many aspects of cultural history and its icons. As a result it sacrifices information on many important political and public figures. We get biographies of Michael Jordan and Marilyn Monroe but no separate bios of George Mason, William Borah, Hiram Johnson, Henry Cabot Lodge, Tom Watson, Joseph Cannon, Thomas Dewey, Nelson Rockefeller, Clarence Darrow, Sam Rayburn, Jesse Jackson -- and the list goes on and on. When they are covered it is often in snipets in subject area articles, which does not give a complete overview of their public careers.

What it does cover in cultural and intellectual history is often incomplete. The Companion has separate artices on the history of the blues, jazz and a weak article on rural country and folk music, but absolutely nothing on bluegrass or commercial country music and its pioneers. The index doesn't even mention the Carter Family, Jimmie Rodgers, Bill Monroe or Hank Williams. Yet country music far exceeds both the blues and jazz in popularity in terms of its fan base and are certainly deserving popular art forms for inclusion.

The selection of significant figures for separate biographies is often strange and arbitrary. The Companion offers a bio of physicist Eugene Wigner but not of Hans Bethe or Richard Feynman, like Wigner both Nobel Prize winners. Feynman is considered by many to be the most important theoretical physicist of the second half of the 20th century. This arbitrariness in selecting subjects for biographies can be repeated in many different subject areas.

The Companion contains 26 black and white maps, often of poor resolution, and follows the same arbitrary editing in terms of subject matter. You get a map of the properties of U.S. Steel, but no map on how the United States looked at the end of the Revolution or after the Louisiana Purchase, though there is a barely readable map of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. No reference tables and charts are included to tell the reader Presidential election results, who were the Chief Justices of the Supreme Court, or who occupied important positions in Congress or the military over the course of American history.

On the positive side there are many good articles here on political and social history. However the reader must use this book carefully and supplement it with other Oxford Companions and reference books. At $... I would examine this book in a library before considering a purchase. ... Read more


32. Christian Life and Character of the Civil Institutions of the United States
by Benjamin Franklin Morris
Hardcover: 830 Pages (2010-08-10)
list price: US$44.99 -- used & new: US$33.99
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 184902670X
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Product Description
Benjamin Franklin Morris' monumental work on the Christian roots of America. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (16)

5-0 out of 5 stars Not a quick read
If you are looking for a quick read and light entertainment, find another book. If you are looking for reference material and incredible amounts of data on the religious background of the founders and signers of the Declaration of Independence, here it is.

I have always enjoyed delving through pages loaded with many infomational, enlightening and entertaining tidbits, but this book has such rich content that it is impossible to skim off the cream. This is a book that requires concentration, and pays off with information.

Highly recommended. Every Christian Pastor should have this book in his library.

5-0 out of 5 stars We ARE a CHRISTIAN nation!
It's important for us to remember that our foundations are as a Christian nation.The beauty of this book explains how and why we are.There is information in this book that has either been edited or deleted in most history books over the past 40 years.

The liberals don't want the information in this book to get out.Anyone found with this book should expect or be mocked or ridiculed for reading such "trash."The thing of it all is, it puts history back in perspective and reveals what has been going on with our country since the late 1800's.Yes, as early as that CHANGES were taking place that have brought us to this point.When you read this book you will see for yourself how it has been happening.

I do not say what has been happening is a "CONSPIRACY."But what has been happening has a long history and has been progressive.As time has gone on the people have gotten louder and stronger.This book will open your eyes and understanding to what is going on.

5-0 out of 5 stars Delivery Disappointment
My package tracking still says it will be delivered today.It is now 7:40pm and no package!This is not Amazon's fault but they need to register a complaint with UPS!I really don't think my book(s) will arrive today.

5-0 out of 5 stars This is a MUST READ & BUY!
In plain terms.....Buy it, Share it, and Distribute it! Nothing explains the foundation of America more clearly, specifically and truthfully. America's survival as a sovereign free nation depends on knowledge from this book entering every household, school and library in the United States. This is THE book that brings the ACLU (american criminal liberties union), left-wing anarchists/atheists, United Nations, Socialists, Communists, and Marxists to a screeching halt.
Save YOUR LIBERTY/FREEDOM and your country. Time is running out, just look at Congress and the White House.

5-0 out of 5 stars If you're a staunch atheist or are affiliated with the ACLU you're not going to like this book AT ALL.
An outstanding read that sheds the light of truth upon the lies & propaganda being pushed upon young Americans. Read it and share it with your loved ones.

Benjamin Franklin Morris' book has been out of print for over 100 years. "This volume is committed to the American people, in the firm assurance that the invaluable facts which it records will be grateful to every patriotic and pious heart. In it, as from the richest mines, has been brought out the pure gold of our history. Its treasures have been gathered and placed in this casket for the instruction and benefit of the present and future. We have a noble historic life; for our ancestors were the worthies of the world. We have a noble nation, full of the evidences of the moulding presence of Christian truth, and of the power and goodness of Divine wisdom in rearing up a Christian republic for all time. That this was the spirit and aim of the early founders of our institutions, the facts in this volume fully testify."
-- Benjamin Franklin Morris

Organizations like the ACLU and Americans United for Separation of Church and State have done their best to ignore the content of the massive compilation of original source material found in this book. If Americans ever become aware of the facts assembled by the author in this historic encyclopedia of knowledge, arguments for a secular founding of America will turn to dust.

Reprinted by American Vision for the first time in over 140 years in 2007, we can't keep this book in print!

It is already in it's eighth printing, again in a beautiful high-quality smythe-sewn hardback version with an updated cover and several formatting improvements.

Don't miss out on the fantastic wealth of information this 1000+ page book has in store. Your children and grandchildren are not being taught the truth of history in public school, and this book will correct that travesty!

Christian Life and Character could very well be responsible for the rediscovering of the truth of America's foundation in Christianity." Excerpt from [...] ... Read more


33. The Constitution of the United States of America
Paperback: 94 Pages (2010-05-27)
list price: US$6.95 -- used & new: US$5.14
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1452898472
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
The Constitution of the United States of America, with the Bill of Rights and all of the Amendments; The Declaration of Independence; and the Articles of ConfederationCollected here in one affordable volume are the most important documents of the United States of America: The Constitution of the United States of America, with the Bill of Rights and all of the Amendments; The Declaration of Independence; and the Articles of Confederation. These three documents are the basis for our entire way of life. Every citizen should have a copy. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (22)

4-0 out of 5 stars waited too long
I should have purchased this a long time ago.Very informative book, every american should own one....

5-0 out of 5 stars Great little copy
Nice stiff cover and great pages.Well laid out and easy to find things quickly.Love this handsom little book!

5-0 out of 5 stars Attractive Gift Book with the Exact Words of our Founding Fathers!
I find it truly hard to believe the negative reviews found here on this book. This is a gift book, a treasure, a keepsake, a collectible. It is the exact text of the founding fathers, nothing more and nothing less. It is very attractive in the way it was put together. The book is exactly as described and well worth the money. Quite frankly, I do believe the $9.95 price is quite small for what you get.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Gift for Any American or Would-Be American
Note: Amazon has grouped together reviews of several different editions of this book; this review is for The Constitution of the United States of America (Little Books of Wisdom).

Americans often have a hard time grasping just how lucky they are to have such a foundation for their rights and their laws.Unlike so many more recent examples, the US Constitution is clear, concise, and simple enough for anyone literate in English to understand it with only the occasional resort to a reference book: bill of attainder, ex post facto law, etc.(In contrast it takes years of careful miseducation in order to get its obvious meaning wrong.)

Of course there are almost as many editions of the Constitution available as there are Americans to buy them for, but this Applewood Books version is a good choice for reasons besides being sturdy, nice looking, and inexpensive.

It is presented without commentary (and associated axe grinding), thus for example allowing anyone with eyes to see just how unjustified are anti-religious and anti-gun interpretations of the crystal clear language of the First and Second Amendments.The result is that the complete Supreme Law of our Land can be printed in just 30 pages.

A downside to this is that, unlike in some versions, obsolete sections, rendered inoperative by later amendments are not designated in any way, leaving it to the reader to check the 13 pages of 27 amendments in order to prevent embarrassment.

A Spanish language edition of the Constitution is also available from Applewood Books: Constitucion de Los Estados Unidos, as are uniform editions of its predecessor: The Articles of Confederation and the reaction to it: The Constitution of the Confederate States of America.

Note: Applewood Books has produced a nice looking inexpensive series of sturdy pocket-sized reprints of important American books, documents, speeches, pamphlets, and poems, the Little Books of Wisdom, uniform with this volume, that are ideal for gifting to doctors, lawyers, teachers, business professionals, and students of same: The Way to Wealth, George Washington's Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior in Company and Conversation, On the Art of Teaching, The Poems of Abraham Lincoln, The Strenuous Life, The Bill of Rights with Writings That Formed Its Foundation, The Path of the Law, The Jefferson Bible: The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth, A Message to Garcia, A Declaration of Sentiments, Robert's Rules of Order, Good Citizenship, On Being Human, A Discourse Upon the Duties of a Physician, The Declaration of Independence with Short Biographies of Its Signers, Teamwork, Stick-To-Itiveness, Opportunity, & You, The Wants of Man, George Washington's Farewell Address, Universal Declaration of Human Rights, The Speech of Chief Seattle, Common Sense, The Emancipation Proclamation, and The Gospel of Wealth.

Some selected volumes are also available in boxed sets: Books of American Wisdom Boxed Set, CEO's Gift Box of Wisdom, Doctor's Gift Box of Wisdom, Lawyer's Gift Box of Wisdom, New Citizen's Gift Box of Wisdom, and Teacher's Gift Box of Wisdom.

And one other has been published in Spanish: Un Mensaje a Garcia.

5-0 out of 5 stars Nice Little Copy of The Constitution
A well-constructed copy of the book that few Americans even bother to read nor is adequately taught in schools.When it is taught, it is portrayed as a "living document" that is open to liberal interpretation and then ultimately change.Incorrect on both counts.If more Americans voted based on the Constitution, we wouldn't be $13,000,000,000,000 in debt and getting deeper everyday. ... Read more


34. A Young People's History of the United States: Class Struggle to the War On Terror (Volume 2)
by Howard Zinn
Hardcover: 240 Pages (2007-05-01)
list price: US$17.95 -- used & new: US$9.50
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1583227601
Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
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Product Description

In volume two, Howard Zinn’s lively, clear prose guides the reader through the wars and revolutions of the twentieth century. Zinn continues his retelling up to the policies and resistances that have characterized the war on terror and that shape the United States of America today. Includes a final chapter updating our country’s history to the present moment.

Howard Zinn is the author of numerous books, including his epic masterpiece, A People’s History of the United States, as well as many recent books published by Seven Stories Press: Voices of a People’s History of the United States and Terrorism and War, both written with Anthony Arnove, and The Zinn Reader. He is professor emeritus of political science at Boston University.

Young People's History of the US

... Read more

Customer Reviews (7)

5-0 out of 5 stars I owe my niece and nephew an apology!
I bought this two volume set to give to Alex and Ana as a gift.I had just purchases Howard Zinn's A Peoples' History of the United States for myself.I noticed these books as well and I thought that they should have these to read as they grow up.I got them home and started to read them before I launched into Howard Zinn's tome (it is over 800 pages).I couldn't put these down.I was so engrossed that I cruised right through them and I was so fired up that I decided to keep these for myself to load to friends.I was also energized to really dig into "The Big Book."Sorry, kids, I promise to order another set of these and this time I'll have them shipped directly to you!

1-0 out of 5 stars Heavily biased and full of inaccuracies.
Every author, historian and journalist has their biases. Most try and back up there biases with facts, Zinn does not, he changes or omits facts to fit his bias.

A few examples of this are: on page 144 he states " Bush administration started two wars in four years" he is referring to the Panama and the first Iraq war. Ok, Panama, perhaps. But he started the first Iraq war? Come on, Iraq invaded Kuwait, not a whole lot of gray area there. On page 69 he states that the evidence against the Rosenbergs was week.However later evidence from the USSR archive provide that in fact they were spies for the USSR. His entire chapter on World War one is misleading, he would lead a reader to believe that WW I was about corporations trying to make a buck, he leaves out how badly Wilson wanted to stay out of the war and only after the Zimmerman letters came to light and the Germans were trying to get Mexico and Japan to attack the US did Wilson choose to go to war with the vast support of the American public.

It seems like on every other page I was amazed at the inaccuracies in this book. Bias is fine but please back it up with some sort fact.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Good Supplemental Reader for Young People.
I feel compelled to respond to some misinformation propagated by another reviewer regarding the book where it is stated that "...[the author] claims on page 209 that "The beginning of the Declaration of Independence says that 'We the people'..." 'We the people'? In the Declaration of Independence?"

The reviewer places the quote entirely out of context. The quote is from the last chapter, which is a prologue or summation of the book by the author. Thus, an opinion by the author is valid, and not some distortion of the historical record as implied. The author is not quoting the Declaration of Independence, he is making a point about it; which would be clear if you read it in context.

This is not a complete history but an overview of The history of the United States. It assumes that you already have a basic outline of historical events. It makes a good supplementary reader for a fifth grade level classroom, and provides an alternative perspective that can lead to healthy discussion. Is it opinionated? Yes. But why would anyone ever think that ANY book would be referred to as gospel? Let students know that there are many ways of presenting information and let them know how to approach the errors and biases that are in every text critically.

Volume One begins with Columbus, which, if we are talking about American History(obviously we are not)is a little late in my opinion, and it runs through the Spanish-american War(shouldn't that be the Cuban-Spanish-American-Filipino-Guam War?). Volume Two begins with "Class Struggle" and runs through the "War on Terror." That sequence itself reflects a distinct perspective. I think that perspective is healthy. To find yourself looking for and questioning the opinions expressed in this reader is a good thing. It is always good to know the difference between an opinion and a fact, and to know when the record reflects a strong bias. Perhaps a sense of cognitive dissonance is a positive step toward thinking through the historical record more critically, and not being too smug in your own opinions. The democratic process requires an informed society. Mr. Zinn doesn't appear to think that our children are very well informed, and I applaud his attempt to do something about it. Whether you agree with him or not, at least we should be talking about it proactively with our kids.

1-0 out of 5 stars A biased and inaccurate history
This book presents a biased and inaccurate history of the US. In Zinn's eyes America is the source of evil in the world. This is historical revisionism and political correctness at its worst. Instead of this, I would recommend "A Patriot's History of the United States" by Schweikart.

2-0 out of 5 stars History?
While at times Howard Zinn puts forth interesting theories, facts occasionally get in the way.For example, he claims on page 209 that "The beginning of the Declaration of Independence says that 'We the people'..."'We the people'?In the Declaration of Independence?

I'm not sure if this is just an issue with Rebecca Stefoff's adaptation, or Zinn's facts, but it's clearly an issue. This isn't a history book, but more a political opinion book which happens to use history to support the author's arguments.

--13 year old history buff



... Read more


35. Grand Expectations: The United States, 1945-1974 (Oxford History of the United States)
by James T. Patterson
Paperback: 829 Pages (1997-11-20)
list price: US$27.95 -- used & new: US$14.00
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0195117972
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
Beginning in 1945, America rocketed through a quarter-century of extraordinary economic growth, experiencing an amazing boom that soared to unimaginable heights in the 1960s. At one point, in the late 1940s, American workers produced 57 percent of the planet's steel, 62 percent of the oil, 80 percent of the automobiles. The U.S. then had three-fourths of the world's gold supplies. English Prime Minister Edward Heath later said that the United States in the post-War era enjoyed "the greatest prosperity the world has ever known." It was a boom that produced a national euphoria, a buoyant time of grand expectations and an unprecedented faith in our government, in our leaders, and in the American dream--an optimistic spirit which would be shaken by events in the '60s and '70s, and particularly by the Vietnam War.

Now, in Grand Expectations, James T. Patterson has written a highly readable and balanced work that weaves the major political, cultural, and economic events of the period into a superb portrait of America from 1945 through Watergate. Here is an era teeming with memorable events--from the bloody campaigns in Korea and the bitterness surrounding McCarthyism to the assassinations of the Kennedys and Martin Luther King, to the Vietnam War, Watergate, and Nixon's resignation. Patterson excels at portraying the amazing growth after World War II--the great building boom epitomized by Levittown (the largest such development in history) and the baby boom (which exploded literally nine months after V-J Day)--as well as the resultant buoyancy of spirit reflected in everything from streamlined toasters, to big, flashy cars, to the soaring, butterfly roof of TWA's airline terminal in New York. And he shows how this upbeat, can-do mood spurred grander and grander expectations as the era progressed.

Of course, not all Americans shared in this economic growth, and an important thread running through the book is an informed and gripping depiction of the civil rights movement--from the electrifying Brown v. Board of Education decision, to the violent confrontations in Little Rock, Birmingham, and Selma, to the landmark civil rights acts of 1964 and 1965. Patterson also shows how the Vietnam War--which provoked LBJ's growing credibility gap, vast defense spending that dangerously unsettled the economy, and increasingly angry protests--and a growing rights revolution (including demands by women, Hispanics, the poor, Native Americans, and gays) triggered a backlash that widened hidden rifts in our society, rifts that divided along racial, class, and generational lines. And by Nixon's resignation, we find a national mood in stark contrast to the grand expectations of ten years earlier, one in which faith in our leaders and in the attainability of the American dream was greatly shaken.

Grand Expectations is the newest volume in the prestigious Oxford History of the United States. The earlier releases were highly acclaimed, and one, Battle Cry of Freedom, was both a New York Times bestseller and a winner of the Pulitzer Prize. Patterson's volume takes its rightful place beside these distinguished works. It is a brilliant summation of the years that created the America that we know today, a time of setbacks and unmatched and lasting achievements.Amazon.com Review
Part of the multivolume Oxford History of the UnitedStates, Grand Expectations spotlights the United States atthe center of the international stage during the post World War IIyears. The book opens on country very different from the U.S. oftoday--racial segregation was law and more than half the nation's farmdwellings had no electricity. With England, Germany, and Japan ravagedby war, the U.S. entered a period of prosperity that soared tounimaginable heights in the 1960s. Though Patterson ends his bookwith the downfall of Nixon andthe beginnings of a troubled economy, he concludes that the U.S. in1974, "remained one of the most stable societies in theworld." ... Read more

Customer Reviews (23)

3-0 out of 5 stars This was a bit of a disappointment..hard to get into
I have read the entire oxford history of US and I must admit, this one didn't leave me too satisfied. I absolutely loved the whole series in it's entirety but the writing of this book was simply not up to the level of the others. I found myself wandering more and not getting into the storytelling like the other books. Let's face it, it was one of the most interesting times of our country but this book didn't do it justice. It would be fine if the other books in the series weren't so good but it should be at the same quality level.

4-0 out of 5 stars Self Sacrifice to Mass Entitlement
What a period to cover, the pace and extent of change is incredible when you look at the critical events between 1945 and 1974. I have read each of the entries in this Oxford History of the United States series and Grand Expectations deals with a fascinating period. The author cannot be blamed for the fact that there is just so much to cover and, as a result, some areas receive less than required attention.

The U.S. was suddenly turbo-charged economically following WW2. Add to that the fact that the country felt it was their destiny to lead the world and you have a combination of runaway materialism and idealized hubris. The prosperity following the war was astonishing: the U.S. possessed 42% of the world's income in the late 1940's and produced half of the manufacturing output with only 7% of the world's population.

Young people were so optimistic that they took on significant debt to fund lifestyles unthinkable in their parent's generation (this actually horrified their parents). Opportunity was everywhere and Americans became famously mobile moving about the country chasing their dreams. In fact, 20% of the population moved every year between the 1940's and 1970's. I myself witnessed this trait when working for an American company in the early 1990's and observed colleagues moving between Los Angeles and New York for a $5,000 raise (I am Canadian and we are far more sedentary).

This era kicked off conspicuous consumption as "stuff" like frozen food, Polaroid cameras, electric clothes dryers, vinyl floors, Styrofoam containers, and televisions became available. Not to mention cars, cars, cars. In 1945, there were 69,500 cars sold, in 1949 sales jumped to 5.1 million. How people lived was influenced by this mobile society with suburban homes designed with the garages on the front rather than in back lane.

Patterson does a great job in the early part of this period covering Truman and Eisenhower. Truman deserves more credit than he receives as president and the author tries to correct that in the book. He exposed me to a different Eisenhower - one who was "more ambitious, crafty, and egotistical than most recognized". Patterson also credits Ike with being the first politician to truly grasp the important of television when most credit Kennedy. I was also surprised by the fact that Ike decreased significantly the armed forces in the 1950's when one expects an ex-General facing the Soviets would be ramping it up. But based on his faith in the nuclear deterrent he actually cut troop levels by 671,000 between 1953 and 1959.

Having read a few histories on the Korean War I found Patterson's work on the topic particularly good. The fluidity and savageness in the first year of the three year war is well covered as is the startlingly high four million civilian deaths the war produced. He does an equally fine job on Vietnam where U.S. troops killed sixteen of the enemy for every one of their casualties. However, body counts were not the way to win this conflict if there ever was one. In the end 11.7 million Americans served during the ten years of the conflict, 2.1 ended up in Vietnam, and 1.6 million saw combat. Of those who fought their average age was 19 compared with 27 in WW2 and the Korean War.

What fascinated me most was how the strong economy impacted society and behavior. Patterson writes, "The majority of Americans, their basic needs more secure, developed ever-larger expectations about life". This led to "rampant commercialization, mindless mass entertainment". Television and advertising exploded. T.S. Eliot wrote at the time that TV is a "medium of entertainment which permits millions of people to listen to the same joke at the same time, and yet remain lonesome."

Patterson points out that the turbulent 1960's disrupted all convention and unsettled the historic societal structure. This disarray influenced almost every facet of daily life. People spoke of rights but seem to have confused that notion with material wants and personal entitlement. It produced a period where trust in institutions was lost, fear of revolution apparent, and nuclear annihilation possible.

Patterson touches on all of the issues from the period one would expect: race and civil rights, sex, Cold War spying, feminism, music, McCarthyism, movies, the pill, Operation Mongoose, the missile crisis, the labor movement, Berlin, the Great Society, Vietnam, and Watergate. But the timeframe and its events are just too broad to detail adequately. He seems to lose steam halfway through the 1960's. However, the book redeems itself in the overall effort, provides insights I had not come across before, and is entertaining and honest. It is both credible for academic research and enjoyable for pleasure reading.

1-0 out of 5 stars Sarah Palin would not approve
This book is too biased against conservatives.If you love this country and believe in Sarah Palin and Glenn Beck, skip this book and stick with the Patriots History of the United States.

4-0 out of 5 stars Grand Expectations
I received this book promptly and the book is in good condition. I found it usable and helpful for my needs.

5-0 out of 5 stars Narrative History at its Best
This is a wonderful work of narrative history and a worthy sequel to David Kennedy's brilliant "Freedom from Fear," which covered America in the Great Depression and World War II.Like Kennedy, Patterson tells the tale chronologically, which is really the only way to narrate history.But also like Kennedy, he organizes the narrative around socio-culutural as well as political, economic, and diplomatic developments.

And also like Kennedy, he has one simple overarching theme.In Kennedy's case, the theme was that the quest for security and inclusiveness explained the era of 1929-45.Patterson's theme is that America in the period of 1945-74 was characterized by grand expectations.Rising expectations are what cause revolutions, to borrow from Crane Brinton.And there was certainly much turmoil in this period that resulted in permanent and beneficial change -- such as civil rights, change in gender roles, environmentalism, the creation of a social safety net.

But another result of grand expectations is hubris -- the country's expectations were too high and America set itself up for a fall.The nation ran up against resource limitations resulting in the first oil shock in 1973, the inability to have a guns-and-butter economy, and the limits of power that the Vietnam experience demonstrates.

Patterson weighs the evidence and historiography judiciously to arrive at what is probably the conventional wisdom of American historians, a slightly left of center group.That conventional wisdom includes a useful paring down of Truman's reputation to reflect his narrow-mindedness and surprising tentativeness and indecisiveness early in his tenure; Eisenhower's extraordinary skills in wielding Presidential power and in keeping the idiot right in check (too bad they don't make Republicans like him anymore); Kennedy's arrogance and failings at domestic policy; Johnson's brilliance at passing legislation but fatal problem with credibility; and Nixon's genius at politics that was his strength and downfall.

I tend to be convinced by the conventional wisdom, except for the treatment of Kennedy, who I believe is short-changed.To say that Kennedy did not grow in office or would not have handled Vietnam differently than Johnson is to ignore the profound effect that the Cuban Missile Crisis had on Kennedy.One only has to read his American University speech to appreciate this.Also, Kennedy does need to be given more credit for his handling of the missile crisis, despite the current fashion of criticizing his approach as reckless.To say that he should have confronted Khrushchev privately is to ignore that public pressure was the only thing that was going to force Khrushchev to back down.Moreover, of all the post-war Presidents, I would only trust Eisenhower and Kennedy to handle the crisis right.The other guys would have stumbled into World War III.

However, while "grand expectations" is in some respects an intriguing and worthwhile way to approach this period, I don't think it quite captures the nature of this era.This was the absolute climax of American power, and one must explore some of the imperial leanings and failings of the United States in this period.America was not just on the defensive in the cold war.It aggressively promoted its economic and political interests around the world and created client state arrangements in every region.This was a short-sighted approach, as was the uniquely American approach of investing too much power in the private sector and in unbridled capitalism.

Patterson, to his credit, does criticize American policymakers for trapping themselves in cold war rhetoric to sell the policy to Americans, which ended up limiting their ability to pursue sensible diplomatic arrangements to do business with left-leaning third world nations and to play the Russians off against the Chinese.This came to a crescendo in Vietnam, when the U.S. was limited by 25 years of cold war rhetoric from standing down in a region that did not implicate the nation's vital inerests.

I've read three volumes of the Oxford History -- McPherson's book on the civil war era, Kennedy's "Freedom from Fear, and now Patterson's book.Each volume is first rate and award winning, and each work is narrative history at its best. ... Read more


36. A Guide Book of United States Coins 2011: The Official Red Book
by R. S. Yeoman
Hardcover: 432 Pages (2010-04-01)
list price: US$16.95 -- used & new: US$10.27
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0794831486
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
The Official Red Book®, now in its 64th year, is famous nationwide as the premiere resource for U.S. coin collectors. This best-selling one-volume library helps you make smart buying decisions as you build your collection. Millions of readers rely on it for full-color photographs, detailed technical data, and up-to-date mintages. The Red Book covers the history of colonial and early American coins; official federal issues from half cents through silver dollars and gold coins; classic and modern commemoratives; Proof and Mint sets; error coins; Civil War tokens; pioneer (territorial) gold; every state and territorial quarter, plus the new National Park quarters; all of the presidential dollars; and more. You ll benefit from its practical essays on grading, investing, auctions, and other hobby subjects and of course, its pricing for 6,000-plus coins, in up to 9 grades each, gathered from more than 100 of the nation s leading coin dealers! The 2011 edition features more than 1,800 full-color photographs to help you confidently identify your coins. Updated values, mintages, and auction records. Expanded coverage of commemoratives, sets, and other coins. The latest research on colonial coins and private/territorial gold. New higher-grade pricing for classic commemoratives. Something of value for every collector, new or experienced. It s no wonder more than 22 million copies of the Red Book have been sold since the 1st edition! ... Read more

Customer Reviews (15)

5-0 out of 5 stars rede book o9f USAA coins
I like the lay flat feature.It's been awhile sence i was into coins.Gotta get back into them.

4-0 out of 5 stars A Fantastic Resource For Information, But...
The 2011 Red Book once again blows away all expectations!It is the industry standard for both beginning and experienced collectors.Now in it's 63rd addition, this year's Red Book added special sections for the 2009 Lincoln Bicentennial Cents, the 2011 Presidential Dollar designs, and the new America The Beautiful Quarter program.There are also extended informational reviews on U.S. Private Issue tokens and colonial coinage.

The only issue with the Red Book is the annual nature.Unfortunately, most pricing is already obsolete due to a fast moving precious metals market.Overall however, the Red Book is definitely the best resource on the market for overall numismatic information.

5-0 out of 5 stars Best Coin Collecting Book You Can Buy!!!
I already had Red Book 2008, but I needed current prices.This book is great! I got what I wanted! Thanks!

5-0 out of 5 stars Coin Guide Book
Great help and very complete. I love this book. The only thing wrong it very hard to see and slow to find items quickly. They should make it available on DVD for quick and easy use on computer for coin collector with poor vision.

5-0 out of 5 stars A gift for a new coin collector
This book was bought as a gift for my sister in law who just started collecting coins. She loved it! It was in perfect condition. ... Read more


37. History of the United States
by Charles Austin Beard
Paperback: 466 Pages (2009-08-07)
list price: US$14.02 -- used & new: US$12.61
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 0217007716
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.This is an OCR edition with typos.Excerpt from book:Scotch flourished for many years enjoying in peace their own form of religion and growing prosperous in the manufacture of fine linen and woolen cloth. Then the blow fell. Toward the end of the seventeenth century their religious worship was put under the ban and the export of their cloth was forbidden bythe English Parliament. Within two decades 'twenty thousand Scotch- Irish left Ulster alone, for America; and all during the eighteenth century the migration continued to be heavy. Although no exact record was kept, it is reckoned that the Scotch-Irish and the Scotch who came directly from Scotland, composed one-sixth of the entire American population on the eve of the Revolution. These newcomers in America made their homes chiefly in New Jersey, Pennsylvania,Settlements or German And Scotch-irish Maryland Virginia and Immigrants ' r" '''.''the Carolmas. Cominglate upon the scene, they found much of the land immediately upon the seaboard already taken up. For this reason most of them became frontier people settling the interior and upland regions. There they cleared the land, laid out their small farms, and worked as " sturdy yeomen on the soil," hardy, industrious, and independent in spirit, sharing neither the luxuries of the rich planters nor the easy life of the leisurely merchants. To their agriculture they added woolen and linen manufactures, which, flourishing in the supple fingers of their tireless women,Wph.ebc.co..k.tmade heavy inroads upon the trade of the English merchants in the colonies. Of their labors a poet has sung:" O, willing hands to toil;Strong natures tuned to the harvest-song and bound to the kindly soil; Bold pioneers for the wilderness, defenders in the field."The Germans. — Third among the colonists in order ofnume... ... Read more

Customer Reviews (9)

5-0 out of 5 stars great textbook
This version is very nice! It is great that it is available again. I remember studying it at school even though it was not the newest book back than either. ;) I love the cover and it gives this misterious book a some kind of athmosphere. The quality is great and the story is facinating. I really love it, a great gift that you will never be wrong with!

5-0 out of 5 stars Review of Kindle Edition
This book should be judged for what it is; a seventy year old high school text with an over-emphasis on economic determinism.The Kindle Edition is done nicely; the illustrations are surprisingly clear and attractive, and the maps are usable. The index functions. The topical structure at the end is very nice; if you are a teacher looking for a new approach this is interesting and gives many possibilities.If you can get the free "public domain" edition of the book it makes an excellent supplementary work for your students; just add on a few questions! If you want to know why today's students read and write so poorly just compare this text with a modern unreadable "committee written" text.When students read well-written non-fiction it influences their own writing style.
This is a classic of great value.

5-0 out of 5 stars A history teacher's review
As a classroom history teacher, I realize that I am out of my league in reviewing this book. Charles and Mary Beard are "name brand" historians. There are precious few historians that make it to that level, and for me, a classroom teacher, to deign to review the work of a historian that has an entire school corporation named for him (his hometown of Knightstown, IN) takes some professional chutzpah on my part. It's the equivalent of a local bar band writing a criticism of the Beatles or a piano student evaluating Chopin.

Well, here's to chutzpah!

On a general level, this is an excellent textbook. Two general themes of the Beards are:

1) economics is a dominant driver of history.
2) America is a story of expanding rights - more groups of people are securing their rights as time goes on.

The book focuses on social issues such as how things were manufactured and societal heirarchy rather than battles, wars and strategies. For example, the Battles of Lexington and Concord (literally the "Shot heard 'round the world") get four sentences, none describing the battle itself. This makes it rather unique in history textbooks, although most don't dwell on the battles for long, they do mention tactics, changes the war brought to technology, etc.

The book is well-written. It has two authors and does not suffer from the stifling over-editing of most modern history texts that render them sterile, dry and boring.

Some commentary based on notes I took while reading:

-A strong section on the colonies.

-An especially well-written, if brief, commentary on the Declaration of Independence.

-From their commentary on a series of inventors in the late 18th and early 19th centuries: "...these men and a thousand more were destroying in a mighty revolution of industry the world of the stagecoach and the tallow candle which Washington and Franklin had inherited little changed from the age of Caesar." (location 4784)

-Charles A. Beard is a big proponent of the theory that underlying economic issues (industrial/small farms vs. large-scale cash crop agricultural) caused the Civil War, not slavery. I think that is an unreconcilable position in that slavery was the basis for the South's wealth - so slavery is the root. Beard lets his dichotomy stand unchallenged in his comment: "While slavery lasted, the economy of the South was inevitably agricultural." (location 5008)

-There are two large comments on immigration that show that the worries we have nowadays are no different than those in the past (locations 6492 & 9046).

-Native Americans (or Indians, if you prefer) are almost totally left out of the book.

-They skim over the backroom deal to end Reconstruction in the Tilden-Hayes Presidential election. They are more sympathetic to the plight of the defeated Southerners than newer textbooks are.

-Very good section on Women's rights. First-rate and better than anything I've seen in a current textbook.

The Beards are proponents of history being driven by economics, but they allow that their theory is not exact nor perfect. They note that the 13 Colonies were quite prosperous and secure just before the Revolutionary War. Despite the fact that their fortunes would be at risk, the Founding Fathers took the road to Independence. They note: "...mere economic advantage is not necessarily the determining factor in the fate of peoples." (location 1463)

It suffers from age a bit, which is to be expected from anything produced in 1921. First of all, it is missing nearly 90 years of history which, of course, cannot be helped. There are a few spelling differences and some different uses of language, such as referring to nationalities as races (the Irish race, etc.). There are understandable non-PC words, such as the use of the word "[...]", which are used without any intended bias, but an inexplicable repeated use of the adjective "savage" to describe the Indians (or Native Americans, if you prefer).

5-0 out of 5 stars A history teacher's review
As a classroom history teacher, I realize that I am out of my league in reviewing this book. Charles and Mary Beard are "name brand" historians. There are precious few historians that make it to that level, and for me, a classroom teacher, to deign to review the work of a historian that has an entire school corporation named for him (his hometown of Knightstown, IN) takes some professional chutzpah on my part. It's the equivalent of a local bar band writing a criticism of the Beatles or a piano student evaluating Chopin.

Well, here's to chutzpah!

On a general level, this is an excellent textbook. Two general themes of the Beards are:

1) economics is a dominant driver of history.
2) America is a story of expanding rights - more groups of people are securing their rights as time goes on.

The book focuses on social issues such as how things were manufactured and societal heirarchy rather than battles, wars and strategies.For example, the Battles of Lexington and Concord (the proverbial the "Shot heard 'round the world") get four sentences, none describing the battle itself. This makes it rather unique in history textbooks, although most don't dwell on the battles for long, they do mention tactics, changes the war brought to technology, etc.

The book is well-written. It has two authors and does not suffer from the stifling over-editing of most modern history texts that render them sterile, dry and boring.

Some commentary based on notes I took while reading:

-A strong section on the colonies.

-An especially well-written, if brief, commentary on the Declaration of Independence.

-From their commentary on a series of inventors in the late 18th and early 19th centuries: "...these men and a thousand more were destroying in a mighty revolution of industry the world of the stagecoach and the tallow candle which Washington and Franklin had inherited little changed from the age of Caesar." (location 4784)

-Charles A. Beard is a big proponent of the theory that underlying economic issues (industrial/small farms vs. large-scale cash crop agricultural) caused the Civil War, not slavery. I think that is an unreconcilable position in that slavery was the basis for the South's wealth - so slavery is the root. Beard lets his dichotomy stand unchallenged in his comment: "While slavery lasted, the economy of the South was inevitably agricultural." (location 5008)

-There are two large comments on immigration that show that the worries we have nowadays are no different than those in the past (locations 6492 & 9046).

-Native Americans (or Indians, if you prefer) are almost totally left out of the book.

-They skim over the backroom deal to end Reconstruction in the Tilden-Hayes Presidential election. They are more sympathetic to the plight of the defeated Southerners than newer textbooks are.

-Very good section on Women's rights. First-rate and better than anything I've seen in a current textbook.

The Beards are proponents of history being driven by economics, but they allow that their theory is not exact nor perfect. They note that the 13 Colonies were quite prosperous and secure just before the Revolutionary War. Despite the fact that their fortunes would be at risk, the Founding Fathers took the road to Independence. They note: "...mere economic advantage is not necessarily the determining factor in the fate of peoples." (location 1463)

It suffers from age a bit, which is to be expected from anything produced in 1921. First of all, it is missing nearly 90 years of history which, of course, cannot be helped. There are a few spelling differences and some different uses of language, such as referring to nationalities as races (the Irish race, etc.).There are understandable non-PC words, such as the use of the word "Negro", which are used without any intended bias, but an inexplicable repeated use of the adjective "savage" to describe the Indians (or Native Americans, if you prefer).

5-0 out of 5 stars simply put: a great book!
A classic every citizen should have. Very intersting, well written and nicely designed book. Can only recommend it! ... Read more


38. Health Policymaking in the United States, Fifth Edition
by Beaufort B. Longest, Jr.
Hardcover: 625 Pages (2010-05-15)
list price: US$102.00 -- used & new: US$101.80
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1567933548
Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
This new edition further clarifies health policy formulation, implementation, and modification. The policymaking process is brought to life through excerpts from congressional testimony, news stories, executive orders, legislation, and other documents related to real-world policy issues.Students will acquire the background they need to analyze the effects of health policies and influence the policymaking process. The book also provides a framework for understanding the development of today s health reform legislation. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (1)

3-0 out of 5 stars Good Information, but Dry
This was a required textbook for one of my classes.As far as the information in the book is concerned, this book is great.The concepts are presented well and are easy to understand.However, the book is REALLY dry.It actually literally puts me to sleep. ... Read more


39. National Geographic Guide to the National Parks of the United States, 6th Edition
by National Geographic
Paperback: 480 Pages (2009-03-17)
list price: US$26.00 -- used & new: US$12.16
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1426203934
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
Featuring 375 color photos and 80 full-color detailed maps—more than any other park guidebook—this is the most comprehensive, up-to-the-minute book of its kind on the market today. A perennial favorite with more than a million copies sold in previous editions, it reflects National Geographic’s century-long association with America’s national parks system and its peerless reputation for travel expertise and cartographic excellence.

The guide opens with an essay by Yellowstone authority Paul Schullery, a section on how to use the guide, and a national locator map. The parks are presented alphabetically region by region, with individual maps and geographical profiles. Colorfully illustrated descriptions offer tours tailored to the time available, whether it’s an hour or a week, and tell visitors the best spots to enjoy hikes, spectacular vistas, wildlife, and more. An Information & Activities page provides practical advice on visiting—park contact information, camping and lodging, accessibility, pet restrictions, things to do, and special advisories. Excursions to nearby wildlife refuges, monuments, forests, and other areas of exceptional interest follow many of the park entries.

From planning a trip to making the most of every minute, here’s all the information anyone could want on the scenic national parks—the crown jewels of the park system—plus invaluable advice from National Geographic writers who know them well. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (20)

3-0 out of 5 stars too light for my taste
Seems to have good summary of the parks.But it is so light in content, ~4 pages per park?, most web searches would come up with similar information.It's good for browsing all the national parks to see which one interests you, but not good enough if you want to visit one in particular.

5-0 out of 5 stars Getting ready to use it next week
So far it looks like it is just what I need for our trip to the Rockies in the near future.

5-0 out of 5 stars A Must Have For Visiting NPs
While on vacation this summer at Glacier National Park, I came across this book in the bookstore.I started thumbing through the pages and saw all the information contained about each park.We had already spent the morning just stopping at the usual tourist turnoffs in the park, but after purchasing the book, we followed the step by step recommendations on what to see and what to do in the park. The book lists the specific amount of time each activity should take as well as additional background information about the activitiy (how the geological formations were created, what the wildlife behaviors are, etc).Not only did it guide us to the best locations, it gave us a lot more information about the locations that the typical park visitor wouldn't have.After Glacier NP, we were headed to 3 more national parks before the end of vacation, and I kept this book by my side the entire time.I never received incorrect information or wished I had not taken the advice the book gave. It was perfect, and I can't wait to use it on our next vacation to a National Park. On a side note, I did pay full sticker price for it at Glacier (since I didn't have the luxury of ordering it off Amazon right then), but it was definitely worth it...even at that price!

4-0 out of 5 stars A Fitting Replacement
For years I relied on the Rand McNally National Park Guides by Dr. Michael Frome, PhD. This was a guy that actually went to the Parks and gave firsthand guidance on what to see, when to see it, how to approach the parks and where to stay. When he retired and stopped developing National Park Guides (the last were for Frommer), I felt a great disconnection because there was no one replacing him as the park system expanded and changed.

Then I found the National Geographic Guide to the National Parks at a NPS visitor center. In the spirit of Michael Frome, it tells you how to get there, how to visit, what to see, how to see it, when to see it, how much time to dedicate to a park based on your interests and what excursions from the park are worthwhile. These guides improve on the Frome guides by providing better pictures and maps but fall short by not providing information for National Monuments.

Although the National Parks are spectacular, National Monuments, in my estimation, are equally worth your time because they are generally more accessible.You can absorb a National Monument more completely than a National Park because they are smaller, less daunting, and less crowded. In fact, Rangers are more available to you at National Monuments since there is less of a crush of visitors.In any case, perhaps I'm recommending to National Geographic that they develop a National Monuments companion guide to go along with their lovely Guide to the National Parks.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great National Parks Book!
We love to visit the National Parks, and this book will be a great help in planning to get the most out of our visits. It is a beautiful book, too. The Parks are grouped by location with helpful information such as when to visit and fees. The book also contains maps and suggestions for lodging and things to do, and information about visitor's centers, etc. I wish we had purchased this book before our recent trip out west! I highly recommend! ... Read more


40. National Geographic Guide to the State Parks of the United States, 3rd Edition (National Geographic's Guide to the State Parks of the United States)
by National Geographic Society
Paperback: 384 Pages (2008-03-18)
list price: US$25.00 -- used & new: US$15.42
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1426202512
Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
With lush photography and comprehensive maps, this one-of-a-kind, up-to-date guide is ideal for the 700 million vacationers who visit state parks each year. From the white water at Ohiopyle State Park, Pennsylvania, to the dunes of Pink Coral Sand Dunes, Utah, the parks are presented in vivid detail and enhanced with more than 200 color photos and 32 maps. Essential information on openings, fees, contact numbers, activities, camping and lodging is included, as well as a new "Hidden Gems" section of tips on favorite places in the parks identified by parks staff.

For the day visitor, the weekend escapist, or the weeklong camper, the guides’ enticing selection of parks—chosen by state park directors who know them all—will inspire everyone.

Of the state parks’ 25,000 miles of trails, the authors have selected favorites for hiking and biking, horseback riding, and wildflower gazing, as well as ample opportunities for the bird-watcher or rock climber, the wildlife observer or the amateur archaeologist. Ideal for anyone who enjoys the outdoors, the National Geographic Guide to the State Parks of the United States, 3rd Edition promises many rewarding parks visits. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (10)

3-0 out of 5 stars road trip travel aide
Contains 3-5 state parks for each state.Next time I will look for regional book that shows 100% of the state parks.Probably means stopping by the visitors bureau at the border.But that negates planning ahead.

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Guide
National Geograhic does as great of a job highlighting the state parks as they did for the national parks.

They can't cover every state park but they do a thorough review of 4-6 parks from each state (they allowed each state to recommend their best parks). Plenty of info. is provided regarding camping, activities, best times to visit, trails to hike, specific areas to visit and things to see, etc.

5-0 out of 5 stars State Parks book
The book was exactly what I expected.It arrived in a timely manor and was given as a gift.Very pleaseed with purchase.

5-0 out of 5 stars State Parks
This is an awesome book and now that we are traveling all the time it really comes in handy

1-0 out of 5 stars A Waste of Money!
A real disappointment!Only a few of the state parks in each state are listed.The info provided is good, but it's very incomplete.Not a good resource for an RV-er. ... Read more


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