Geometry.Net - the online learning center
Home  - Basic_I - Industrial Revolution Workers

e99.com Bookstore
  
Images 
Newsgroups
Page 1     1-20 of 98    1  | 2  | 3  | 4  | 5  | Next 20
A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

         Industrial Revolution Workers:     more books (55)
  1. The Industrial Revolution: Workers and their Lives (The Lucent Library of Historical Eras) by Don Nardo, 2009-06-05
  2. Women Workers in the Industrial Revolution by Ivy Pinchbeck, 2004-11-11
  3. Workers in the Industrial Revolution
  4. Young Workers in the Industrial Revolution (Exploring History) by A.D. Cameron, 1981-08-03
  5. Stalin's Industrial Revolution: Politics and Workers, 1928-1931 (Cambridge Russian, Soviet and Post-Soviet Studies) by Hiroaki Kuromiya, 1990-06-29
  6. Women Workers and the Industrial Revolution 1750-1850 by Ivy Pinchbeck, 1969
  7. Women workers and the industrial revolution, 1750-1850,: By Ivy Pinchbeck (London school of economics. Studies in economic and social history) by Ivy Pinchbeck, 1930
  8. Women Workers in the Industrial Revolution by Ivy Pinchbeck, 1969
  9. Urban Workers in the Industrial Revolution (Croom Helm studies in society and history) by R Glen, 1986-09
  10. Stalin's Industrial Revolution : Politics and Workers, 1928-1931 (Cambridge Russian, Soviet and Post-Soviet Studies) by Hiroaki Kuromiya, 1980
  11. Workers in the Industrial Revolution, by Peter, Stearns, 1974
  12. Urban Workers in the Early Industrial Revolution by Robert Glen, 1984-04
  13. What Automation Means to You: a Summary of the Effects of the Second Industrial Revolution on the American Worker by Abraham Weiss, 1955-01-01
  14. English Workers' Living Standards During the Industrial Revolution: A New Look by Peter H. and Williamson, Jeffrey G. Lindert, 1983

1. Error: Can't Find Web Site
Index The American Industrial Revolution Development of the Industrial United States( 1870 1900 ) Changes In America industrial revolution workers in 19th
http://members.aol.com/TeacherNet/Industrial.html
Web Site Not Displayed Sorry, We Can't Display That Page
This member has exceeded their bandwith for the day. Please check back after 4 am EST to access this page Hometown Community Guidelines 500 Unknown Host

2. Lesson: Industrial Revolution (Women In World History Curriculum)
Inspectors visited mills, mines and shops taking evidence from workers to seeways in which the industrial revolution affected women and families.
http://www.womeninworldhistory.com/lesson7.html
Classroom Lesson Series The Plight of Women's Work in the Early
Industrial Revolution in England and Wales
The Industrial Revolution in part was fueled by the economic necessity of many women, single and married, to find waged work outside their home. Women mostly found jobs in domestic service, textile factories, and piece work shops. They also worked in the coal mines. For some, the Industrial Revolution provided independent wages, mobility and a better standard of living. For the majority, however, factory work in the early years of the 19th century resulted in a life of hardship. The following selections are testimonies from England and Wales collected by Parliamentary commissions who began to investigate the industrial employment of women and children in the early 1840s. Inspectors visited mills, mines and shops taking evidence from workers to see ways in which the Industrial Revolution affected women and families. The sources, along with illustrations and a workforce chart, reveal the following points: Working conditions were often unsanitary and the work dangerous.

3. Lesson: Industrial Revolution - Textile Workers (Women In World History Curricul
Primary Source material about women textile mill workers during the industrialrevolution in England and Wales. Textile workers industrial revolution.
http://www.womeninworldhistory.com/textile.html
Textile Workers
Industrial Revolution 1) Courtauld Silk Mill Workforce:
Samuel Courtauld built a silk mill in 1825 in Halstead, Essex (South East England). Before the Industrial Revolution, Halstead was an agricultural community with a cottage industry producing woolen cloth. In Halstead, as elsewhere in England, unemployment among depressed farming households and former wool workers forced people to find work outside the home. Because their labor was cheap, women more than men were recruited into the textile factories that sprang up all over Britain in the 19th century. This is a chart of the Courtauld workforce in 1860. The wages are in British schillings. Number Weekly Wages MALES 1000 pounds per year Mill Manager (Also got 3 per cent of the profits) Overseers and clerks Mechanics and engine drivers Carpenters and blacksmiths Lodgekeeper Power loom machinery attendants and steamers Mill machinery attendants and loom cleaners Spindle cleaners, bobbin stampers and packers, messengers, sweepers Watchmen Coachmen, grooms and van driver

4. Cotton Times
An overview of the industrial revolution in textiles, profiling workers and reformers of 18th century Britain, related events in labor history, and describing modes of transportation and living.
http://www.cottontimes.co.uk/
THE STORY OF HISTORY'S GREATEST UPHEAVAL Overview
Timeline

Who was Who

Inventors
...
The Wheelgate

Search Cottontimes:
sitemap

YOU can't hope to understand the Industrial Revolution without knowing something of what happened in Lancashire from the second half of the 18th century. This English backwater was the cradle of Britain's industrial greatness. Back in 1750, few sophisticated Georgian Londoners would have given any thought to Lancashire and fewer still would have seen the need to travel north on mudbath roads to visit. But within a few years, businessmen, politicians, statesmen and even royalty were beating a path to the county to find out just what was going on there. Lancashire's yeomen had suddenly blossomed into a society of inventors, engineers, businessmen and radical thinkers who were to turn the world upside down. The revolution was not all about cotton, of course. But it was the ingenuity of Lancashire men like John Kay and Samuel Crompton that spearheaded the march to the world's first industrial society, and we make no apology for giving them prominence. This is their story. It tells of the inventors, those who exploited the inventions, and the politicians, reformers and medical scientists who battled to contain the worst of the inevitable social fall-out. Sadly, it also tells of those who paid the price of progress with their health and often their lives.

5. Conditions Of The Working-Class In England Index
Fredrich Engel's widely read analysis of the effects of the industrial revolution on English life. An indictment of capitalism's oppression of workers in Victorian England.
http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1840/cond-wce/index.htm
Marx/Engels Internet Archive
The Condition of the Working Class in England
Frederick Engels
Written: September 1844 to March 1845;
Published: in Leipzig in 1845;
Transcribed: by Tim Delaney in 1998.
Table of Contents
Dedication:
To the Working-Classes of Great Britain
Preface to 2nd German Edition (1892)

Preface

Introduction

The Industrial Proletariat
... Marx/Engels Archive

6. The Industrial Revolution, Workers, And The Working Classes: Selected Bibliograp
The industrial revolution, workers, and the Working Classes Selected Bibliography. Glen,Robert. Urban workers in the Early industrial revolution.
http://65.107.211.206/technology/ir/3.html
The Industrial Revolution, Workers, and the Working Classes: Selected Bibliography
George P. Landow , Shaw Professor of English and Digital Culture, National University of Singapore
This bibliography was created with the assistance of Victorian Database on a CD-ROM, 1970-1995 , which was produced at the University of Alberta. Benson, Ian, and John Lloyd. New Technology and Industrial Change: The Impact of the Scientific-Technical Revolution on Labour and Industry . London: Kogan Page/ New York: Nichols Pub 1983. Berg, Maxine. "What Difference Did Women's Work Make to the Industrial Revolution?" History Workshop 1993 (35/spr) 22-44. Berlanstein, Lenard R., ed. The Industrial Revolution and Work in Nineteenth-Century Europe London: Routledge, 1992. Cohen, Marjorie."Changing Perceptions of the Impact of the Industrial Revolution on Female Labor." International Journal of Women's Studies Fleischman, Richard K. Conditions of Life Among the Cotton Workers of Southeastern Lancashire During the Industrial Revolution, 1780-1850 . New York: Garland 1985. Glen, Robert.

7. The Industrial Revolution, Workers, And The Working Classes: Selected Bibliograp
The industrial revolution, workers, and the Working Classes Selected Bibliography George P. Landow, Shaw Professor of English and Digital Culture, National University of Singapore
http://www.victorianweb.org/victorian/technology/ir/3.html
The Industrial Revolution, Workers, and the Working Classes: Selected Bibliography
George P. Landow , Shaw Professor of English and Digital Culture, National University of Singapore
This bibliography was created with the assistance of Victorian Database on a CD-ROM, 1970-1995 , which was produced at the University of Alberta. Benson, Ian, and John Lloyd. New Technology and Industrial Change: The Impact of the Scientific-Technical Revolution on Labour and Industry . London: Kogan Page/ New York: Nichols Pub 1983. Berg, Maxine. "What Difference Did Women's Work Make to the Industrial Revolution?" History Workshop 1993 (35/spr) 22-44. Berlanstein, Lenard R., ed. The Industrial Revolution and Work in Nineteenth-Century Europe London: Routledge, 1992. Cohen, Marjorie."Changing Perceptions of the Impact of the Industrial Revolution on Female Labor." International Journal of Women's Studies Fleischman, Richard K. Conditions of Life Among the Cotton Workers of Southeastern Lancashire During the Industrial Revolution, 1780-1850 . New York: Garland 1985. Glen, Robert.

8. Women Workers And The Industrial Revolution, 1750-1850
Ivy Pinchbeck, Women workers and the industrial revolution, 17501850.London GeorgeRoutledge, 1930. Women workers and the industrial revolution, 1750-1850.
http://www.eh.net/bookreviews/library/burnette.shtml
Project 2001: Significant Works in Twentieth-Century Economic History Women Workers and the Industrial Revolution, 1750-1850
Ivy Pinchbeck, Women Workers and the Industrial Revolution, 1750-1850. London: George Routledge, 1930. x + 342 pp.
Review Essay by Joyce Burnette, Department of Economics, Wabash College.
burnettj@wabash.edu
A Pioneer in Women's History:
Ivy Pinchbeck's Women Workers and the Industrial Revolution, 1750-1850
During the past twenty years economic historians have begun to pay more attention to the role of women in the economy of Industrial Revolution Britain, and how our conclusions might change if we no longer neglect them. We can thank Ivy Pinchbeck for blazing the trail seventy years ago. Her Women Workers and the Industrial Revolution, 1750-1850 is one of the most significant works in twentieth-century economic history both because of its merits and because of the impact it had on later scholarship. Pinchbeck consulted a huge number of primary sources, and was able to synthesize this material into broader conclusions that have shaped our understanding of women's history. The book was a pioneering effort in the field of women's economic history, and has served as a valuable resource for later researchers. Ivy Pinchbeck is not one of economic history's superstars, and relatively little is known about her. She was born in 1898. In 1930 she received her Ph.D. in Economic History from the London School of Economics, where she worked under Eileen Power. She spent her entire career (1928 through her retirement) at Bedford College, London. In 1969 she published (with Margaret Hewitt) Children in English Society, which examined English children from the sixteenth century to the twentieth century. She also published a couple of articles in the British Journal of Sociology, but her list of publications is not particularly long. Pinchbeck wrote about women's history before it was considered an important topic, and she lived, and presumably died, in relative obscurity.

9. A Trip To The Past
Times An overview of the industrial revolution in textiles, profiling workers and reformers of 18th century Britain,
http://members.aol.com/mhirotsu/kevin/trip2.html
A trip to the past s
The Industrial Revolution was a time of dramatic change, from hand tools and handmade items, to products which were msass produced by mawhjfhk;lasjgvk;jlsavj;h;sav;savchines. Workers became more productive, and since more items were manufactured, prices dropped, making exclusive and hard to make items available to the poor and not only the rich and elite. Life generally improved, but the industrial revolution also proved harmful. Pollution increased, working conditions were harmful, and capitalists employed women and young children, making them work long and hard hours. The industrial revolution was a time for change. For the better, or for the worse. This web page is dedicated to the industrial revolution, the changes that occurred and how it effected modern life. This web page demonstrates the transition from hand tools to machines, and shows the pros and cons of the revolution.

10. Alter, George. The Industrial Revolution
Peter H. Lindert and Jeffrey G. Williamson, English workers' Living Standardsduring the industrial revolution A New Look , Economic History Review, 2nd.
http://www.eh.net/coursesyllabi/syllabi/AlterG-a.shtml
History B300 "The Industrial Revolution"
Spring 1998
George Alter
Description Course requirements Books available at the bookstore ... Supplementary Readings
Office hours: Wednesday 12:00-2:00 in Ballantine 707 and by appointment Telephone: 855-5631, 855-1923 E-mail: ALTER@INDIANA.EDU Description This course will examine the conversion of Europe >from an agricultural to an industrial society. We will look for the roots of modern economic growth in European society and the contributions of science and technology, trade, government, and population. We will also consider the consequences of industrialization for living standards, both long-run improvements and short-run hardships, and the rise of European power abroad. We will begin by examining the economy of Europe in the 17 th and 18 th centuries. Next, we will look for patterns of economic development in the three largest European powers, Britain, France and Germany. After that, we will take a thematic approach to the causes and consequences of the Industrial Revolutions of the nineteenth century. Course requirements: Grades will be based on the following: Three papers, 4-6 pp., 15% each

11. Industrial Revolution
womeninworldhistory.com/lesson7.html The life of women during the industrial revolution. thefactory, reformers, supporters of child labor, workers voices and
http://score.rims.k12.ca.us/activity/IndustRev/

Pageant of World History p.515 Industrial Revolution Teacher Notes Dear M.P._, The House of Commons Parliamentary Committee on Working and Living Conditions welcomes you as a new member. We have been diligently holding committee meetings investigating the impact of this so-called factory system on our fair land. In your folder, you will have a number of critical pieces of testimony from prior inquiries into this phenomenon which has caused such tumult. In addition, you can read other testimony in our archives. You need to do this soon. In four days, a great debate is scheduled in the House of Commons. We expect you, as a member of our committee, to author a bill addressing a critical aspect of these events. You will also be expected to argue the bill's merits in front of friend and foe alike. We realize that your party affiliation will influence your bill, but also keep in mind the best interests of England. Please be as specific as possible in your bill, using detailed and accurate monetary figures. Also keep in mind the role of Her Majesty's government in monitoring this event. Sincerely

12. Industrial Revolution
led to the growth of the factory system, which brought workers and machines to twoother industries that were essential to the industrial revolution¬ócoal and
http://www.fresno.k12.ca.us/schools/s090/history/industrial_revolution.htm
Early spinning machine James watt
Beginnings of the Industrial Revolution
A revolution in agriculture in the 1700s created conditions that favored the Industrial Revolution.Farmers began growing new crops and using new technology such as the seed drill and the iron plow. Increased food production improved people's diet and health, which in turn contributed to rapid population growth. Better farming methods meant that fewer people were needed to farm. As a result, unemployed farmers formed a large new labor force.
The factory system.
Improvements in transportation and communication.
During the Industrial Revolution, advances were made in transportation and communication. In Britain, roads made of longer-lasting surfaces and canals connected all parts of the nation. A mining engineer, George Stephenson, developed the first steam-powered locomotive, opening the way for the building of railroads. Railroads and steam-powered ships improved transportation around the world. In 1837, an American inventor, Samuel F.B. Morse, devised the telegraph, which revolutionized communications.
Why Britain took the lead.

13. The Industrial Revolution
The industrial revolution was a dramatic change in the nature of production in energysources replaced human or animal power, and skilled workers were replaced
http://www.missouri.edu/~socbrent/industrv.htm
Return to Sociology Timeline
The Industrial Revolution
The Industrial Revolution was a dramatic change in the nature of production in which machines replaced tools, steam and other energy sources replaced human or animal power, and skilled workers were replaced with mostly unskilled workers.
A key element of the Industrial Revolution was the harnessing of steam power through steam engines such as those shown here.
The Industrial Revolution resulted in work that had been performed in the home by family members, such as spinning yarn, being performed with the help of large powerful machines in factories, such as the early textile mill shown on the right. The Industrial Revolution permitted trends begun in the domestication revolution and agricultural revolution to continue, resulting in still greater inequality, as illustrated by the picture on the left of homeless boys on the streets of London. The Picture below, popular during the 19th Century, also illustrates the great difference in wealth and living conditions between the rich bourgeoise who owned the means of production and factory and mine workers who labored for them.
Idea Works and the program names mentioned above are all trademarks of Idea Works, Inc.

14. Modern Western Civ. 16: Industrial Revolution: Tech/Effects
be discussed under lecture on Socialism). C. Was the industrial revolution Goodfor such as Blake and Wordsworth protested the treatment of workers + Dickens.
http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/lect/mod16.html
[Back to Modern Europe Syllabus Paul Halsall
Modern Western Civilization Class 16: The Industrial Revolution: Technology and Effects I. Introduction
  • Recap last lecture -looked at origins of Industrial Revolution
  • had to explain
    [1] the mobile labor force
    [2] the availability of money for investment
    [3] the growth of demand
  • -did this by looking at
    [1] effects of Agricultural Revolution
    [2] the growth of internal and external commerce
    [3] pop. Growth
  • -also took into consideration
    [1] the need for innovative approaches, especially in the area of power
    [2] the special geographical and political circumstances of GB.
  • -all these things were interconnected - came together to produce Industrial Revolution
II. What was Industrial Revolution? The term only used at the end of the 19th Century -so this is revolution in an odd sense of the word :
  • Factories
  • Urbanisation of the population
  • Massively increased production
This is was we are going to look at today. III. Industrial Technology
  • A. Introduction
    • Idea of Industrial Rev. as a Process. -one invention leads to another, which leads to new situations which call for yet other changes. [discuss this idea]

15. Internet Modern History Sourcebook: Scientific, Political & Industrial Revolutio
of Textiles Arnold Toynbee (18521883) Lectures on the industrial revolution inEngland At McMasterFull Text; Leeds Woolen workers' Petition, 1786 At this
http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/modsbook2.html
Halsall Home Ancient History Sourcebook Modern History Course Medieval Sourcebook
Other History Sourcebooks: African East Asian Indian Islamic ... Modern World
Notes: WEB Link to a World Wide Web site MEGA Link to a site which offers a guide to the net. RG Reading Guide to a text SUMMARY Summary (notes) sheet of period/issue
Paul Halsall, halsall@fordham.edu , Sourcebook Compiler Research Help Although I am more than happy to receive notes if you have comments on this web site, I cannot answer specific research enquiries [and - for students - I cannot, or rather will not, do your homework.] See the HELP! page for more suggestions on texts and research. - page hits since September 22, 1997. IMPORTANT: New Structure for the Modern History Sourcebook As of January 20 1999, the Internet Modern History Sourcebook has been completely reorganized. Each of the main sections had became too large [nearly 300k] to maintain as one file. To see the new arrangement go to the Main Index . The four older index files - Early Modern Three Revolutions 19th Century Modern World - will all remain available indefinitely, and the URLs of individual files will not alter. But no new texts (after 12/31/1998) will be added to these large index pages. For new texts, use the new structure, or check the

16. Women Workers And The Industrial Revolution 1750-1850 Pinchbeck Ivy
Women workers and the industrial revolution 17501850 Pinchbeck Ivy. Pinchbeck Ivy.Women workers and the industrial revolution 1750-1850 Business Investing
http://www.first-poembox.com/Pinchbeck-Ivy-Women-Workers-and-the-Industri-071461
Women Workers and the Industrial Revolution 1750-1850 Pinchbeck Ivy
Pinchbeck Ivy
Women Workers and the Industrial Revolution 1750-1850
Carteret and Newcastle : A Co...

Williams, Basil Life of Willia...

Woodward, E. L. Three Studies ...

Home
...
Halberstadt, Hans Airborne : A...

17. Samuel Slater - Father Of The American Industrial Revolution
Conditions often declined when workers were in great supply. In the early yearsof the American industrial revolution, many families realized an increase in
http://www.woonsocket.org/slatervillagelife.html
Rhode Island's Mill Villages
Slater Mill Historic Site Samuel Slater began the American Industrial Revolution when he constructed the first successful textile mill in Pawtucket in 1793. By its third year of operation, the Slater Mill had 30 employees, almost all of them children . Because large, poor families were an attractive pool of labor, Slater built housing to attract them. This also concentrated the work force within easy walking distance to the mills. Since mill workers had to buy everything that they needed to survive, Slater built company stores to provide for their needs. Paying wages in the form of credit at the company store also allowed him retain essential cash. To provide for his workers' spiritual needs, Slater built churches and established schools near his mills. These institutions were also used to socialize workers in ways that he approved. Company Store at the
Slatersville Mill Village
On one hand, the creation of a company village was intended to be seen as the philanthropic act of a benevolent mill owner, a perception that would help to inspire worker loyalty. On the other, the enterprise had to be seen by investors as a justified expense, one that would ensure consistent profits by allowing management to control almost every aspect of the lives of its workers' lives. Every feature of these villages - their buildings, street layouts and housing - were the product of careful thought and planning. On the Shop Floor from the
Museum of Work and Culture
In these villages, the mill owner alone determined the hours, earnings and physical conditions of the workers. Conditions often improved when the supply of workers was limited. Conditions often declined when workers were in great supply. In the early years of the American Industrial Revolution, many families realized an increase in their standard of living as they moved from farm to factory. In the process, though, they gave up self-sufficiency for a credit-based economy centered on the company store. In later years as the supply of workers grew, it was not unusual for owners to take advantage of their power over now dependant workers.

18. Samuel Slater - Father Of The American Industrial Revolution
Samuel Slater's first employees were all children from seven to twelve yearsof age. By 1830, 55% of the mill workers in Rhode Island were children.
http://www.woonsocket.org/slaterchildlabor.html

19. Lowell National Historical Park - Industrial Revolution In England
Before the industrial revolution, textiles were produced under the puttingout system,in the hand loom; increases in output required more hand workers at each
http://www.nps.gov/lowe/loweweb/Lowell History/england.htm
Historical Information: -Select a Topic- Prologue Lowell's Southern Connection Industrial Revolution in England Early American Manufacturing Transportation Canals Making Textiles Waltham-Lowell System Lowell Machine Shop Lowell's Canal System Waterpower in Lowell Mill Power Drives Power Looms "Mill Girls" Boarding Houses Immigrants Working Conditions Products of the Mills Lowell's Other Industries Decline and Recovery Rebirth of Lowell Jack Kerouac British historian Eric Hobsbawm sharply characterized English industrial history: "Whoever says Industrial Revolution says cotton." Rapid industrialization transformed the lives of English men and women after 1750, and changes in cotton textiles were at the heart of this process. The manufacture and export of various cloths were vital to the English economy in the 17th and early 18th centuries. Before the Industrial Revolution, textiles were produced under the putting-out system, in which merchant clothiers had their work done in the homes of artisans or farming families. Production was limited by reliance on the spinning wheel and the hand loom; increases in output required more hand workers at each stage.

20. ReferenceResources:IndustrialRevolution
from 17001900; photographs; organized by different topics Factory workers, Lifein The Plight of Women's Work in the Early industrial revolution in England
http://www.kidinfo.com/American_History/Industrial_Revolution.html
Reference Resources: Industrial Revolution
The Industrial Revolution America and the Industrial Revolution Links to sites with information about the Industrial Revolution Age of Industry: The Industrial Revolution Very nice site dealing with events, people, and important topics about the Industrial Revolution From Mass Production and Popularization to Motorization A brief summary of the movement from mass production to the production of the automobile; color photographs of early model cars Industrial Revolution Links Links to sites which contain information about the Industrial Revolution The Industrial Revolution The Industrial Revolution: Learn about the industrial revolution; facts; link resources Growth and Transformation Facts and information The Industrial Revolution: A Trip to the Past Web page dedicated to the industrial revolution, the changes that occurred and how it affected modern life; demonstrates the transition from hand tools to machines, and shows the pros and cons of the revolution

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

Page 1     1-20 of 98    1  | 2  | 3  | 4  | 5  | Next 20

free hit counter