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         Febrile Seizure:     more books (32)
  1. Febrile Seizures
  2. The Official Parent's Sourcebook on Febrile Seizures: A Revised and Updated Directory for the Internet Age by Icon Health Publications, 2002-09-16
  3. Febrile seizures (Postgraduate Medicine) by JTE Multimedia, 2010-06-03
  4. Febrile Seizures - A Medical Dictionary, Bibliography, and Annotated Research Guide to Internet References by ICON Health Publications, 2004-09-28
  5. Febrile Seizures
  6. Febrile seizures from vaccines appear benign. (DTP, MMR VACCINES STUDIED).(Brief Article): An article from: Family Practice News by Damian Mcnamara, 2001-10-15
  7. Febrile seizures: An entry from Thomson Gale's <i>Gale Encyclopedia of Neurological Disorders</i> by Marcos do Carmo Oyama, Iuri, MD, PhD Louro, 2005
  8. Parents Need Information About Febrile Seizures.(Brief Article)(Statistical Data Included): An article from: Family Practice News by Mike Bykowski, 2000-03-01
  9. EMS Magazine May 2010 Educating EMS, Why Distance Learning Makes Sense, Could a Bachelor's Degree Help Your Career? Implementation Challenges of the New Education Standards, Febrile Seizures, ROC PRIMED Study
  10. Treatment discouraged after first febrile seizure. (Evidence-Based Guidelines).: An article from: Family Practice News by Sherry Boschert, 2002-12-01
  11. Avoid antiepileptics for first febrile seizure. (Evidence-based Guidelines).: An article from: Clinical Psychiatry News by Sherry Boschert, 2003-03-01
  12. MMRV vaccine-febrile seizure link eyed.(News): An article from: Pediatric News by Sharon Worcester, 2008-12-01
  13. Influenza a infection poses higher risk for febrile seizures. (Call for Annual Immunization for all Kids).(Brief Article): An article from: Pediatric News by Sally Koch Kubetin, 2002-01-01
  14. Febrile seizures: An entry from Thomson Gale's <i>Gale Encyclopedia of Children's Health: Infancy through Adolescence</i> by Stephanie Sherk, 2006

1. Febrile Seizure
febrile seizure. A febrile seizure is a seizure caused by sudden elevationof the body temperature in a child in the proper age range
http://www.drhull.com/EncyMaster/F/febrile_seizure.html

Help for sleepless parents
Encyclopedia Index F febrile seizure Search
febrile seizure
A febrile seizure is a seizure caused by sudden elevation of the body temperature in a child in the proper age range, generally six months to three years old (some authorities extend the age range a bit but not beyond five or six years). Points about febrile seizures:
  • Febrile seizures are frightening to the parents but do not cause any harm to the child unless very prolonged. The usual seizure lasts three to five minutes and is harmless to the child. Febrile seizures are essentially impossible to prevent. They generally occur on a rapid upswing in the temperature, often before the parents are aware the child even has a fever. Most children only have one or at most two such seizures in childhood. They do not cause epilepsy later in life. Febrile seizures are limited to the young, probably under three years old. A seizure with a concomitant fever in an older child is a different animal and may indeed be related to epilepsy. True febrile seizures are usually thought to be generalised (the whole body is involved) and not focal (for example involving only one arm or one side of the body) although a true febrile seizure may begin focally and progress to the whole body.

2. Febrile Seizure
febrile seizure. Convulsion that occurs in some otherwise normal children when their body temperature rises quickly.
http://www.babyzone.com/drnathan/F/Febrileseizure.htm
[drnathan/left.htm] Febrile seizure Convulsion that occurs in some otherwise normal children when their body temperature rises quickly. Children usually outgrow these types of seizures. Children show no neurological damage, but have a slightly increased risk of developing epilepsy in the future, although this is still not universally agreed upon. Any seizure that lasts five minutes or is associated with respiratory difficulty requires immediate emergency help (Dial 911). [drnathan/sitedex.htm]

3. MEDLINEplus Medical Encyclopedia: Febrile Seizure (children)
febrile seizure (children). children. A child who has a febrile seizureonce may not have further seizures in response to a fever.
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000980.htm
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Febrile seizure (children)
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Illustrations
Grand mal seizure Central nervous system Alternative names Return to top Seizure - fever induced Definition Return to top A febrile seizure is a brief, generalized, symmetric convulsion in a child that occurs in association with fever but without any brain or spinal cord infection or neurologic cause. Causes, incidence, and risk factors Return to top A febrile seizure is a generalized tonic-clonic (grand mal) seizure that occurs in some children as a response to a fever . Febrile seizures are usually associated with rapidly rising fevers, and usually occur early in the fever rather than later. The seizure may last a few seconds up to a few minutes (although short seizures are more typical). It most commonly occurs in children between the ages of 6 months and 6 years of age. Approximately 2-5% of children will have a seizure associated with fevers. However, the exact cause of febrile seizures is unknown.
There is a tendency for febrile seizures to run in families. This suggest thats there are genetic factors involved. Occasionally, seizures associated with fever may be a symptom of other diseases such as poisoning

4. Febrile Seizure
Example febrile seizure. febrile seizure - febrile seizure is a seizure caused by sudden elevation of the body
http://www.ability.org.uk/febrile_seizure.html
Our Aims Services Stats ... Z Febrile Seizure Health Center: Infant Care - Febrile Seisures - What is a febrile seizure and what do I do if my baby should have one? Example - febrile seizure febrile seizure - febrile seizure is a seizure caused by sudden elevation of the body temperature in a child in the proper age range, generally six months to three years old (some authorities extend. febrile seizure without a fever? febrile seizure without a fever?. Febrile Seizure - Febrile Seizure List of Primary Care Physicians. What Every Parent Should Know About Febrile Seizures / AAFP Patient Information Handout Predictors for the Risk of Recurrent Febrile Seizures / Tips From Other Journals - American Family Physician, High Fever Raises Risk of Multiple Febrile Seizures - Children with a history of febrile seizures are more likely to have multiple seizures in a subsequent febrile episode if they are younger and have high temperatures at the onset of and during the course of the fever, a study of 230 children has found. Febrile Seizures - Three to five percent of normal, healthy children suffer a "febrile seizure" or "fever convulsion" (about 1 in 20 children). Typically the child is between 6 months and 5 years old. Febrile seizures occur more frequently in boys.

5. Single Seizure Evaluation
febrile seizure, Book, Home risk. Criteria for febrile seizure GeneralizedSeizure; Occurs once in 24 hour period and last 15 minutes; Associated
http://www.fpnotebook.com/NEU210.htm
Home About Links Index ... Editor's Choice Paid Advertisement (click above). Please see the privacy statement Neurology Seizure Assorted Pages Seizure Single Seizure Evaluation Status Epilepticus Epilepsy Resources ... Zonisamide Single Seizure Evaluation Book Home Page Cardiovascular Medicine Dental Dermatology Emergency Medicine Endocrinology Gastroenterology General Medicine Geriatric Medicine Gynecology Hematology and Oncology HIV Infectious Disease Jokes Laboratory Neonatology Nephrology Neurology Obstetrics Ophthalmology Orthopedics Otolaryngology Pediatrics Pharmacology Prevention Psychiatry Pulmonology Radiology Rheumatology Sports Medicine Surgery Urology Chapter Neurology Index Autonomic Cerebellum Chorea Cranial Nerve Cognitive CSF Cardiovascular Medicine Demyelinating Disability Examination Ophthalmology Gynecology Headache Infectious Disease Laboratory General Level of Consciousness Motor Obstetrics Pediatrics Pharmacology Procedure Psychiatry Radiology Seizure Sensory Sports Medicine Surgery Tremor Page Seizure Index Approach Approach Single Event Evaluation Approach Status Epilepticus Resources Types Absence Types Febrile Types Grand Mal Types Partial Types Partial Complex Types Rolandic
  • History of event Careful review of events leading up to Seizure Presence of prodromes or auras Description of Seizure by reliable witness Postictal observations Time to complete recovery Medical History Febrile Convulsion s Head Injury Cerebrovascular and Cardiovascular disease Cancer Substance Abuse Infectious disease Family History Febrile Convulsion s Epilepsy in siblings, parents, or close relatives
  • 6. Febrile Seizure
    febrile seizure. Health Center Infant Care Febrile Seisures - Whatis a febrile seizure and what do I do if my baby should have one?
    http://www.ability.org.uk/Febrile_Seizure.html
    Our Aims Services Stats ... Z Febrile Seizure Health Center: Infant Care - Febrile Seisures - What is a febrile seizure and what do I do if my baby should have one? Example - febrile seizure febrile seizure - febrile seizure is a seizure caused by sudden elevation of the body temperature in a child in the proper age range, generally six months to three years old (some authorities extend. febrile seizure without a fever? febrile seizure without a fever?. Febrile Seizure - Febrile Seizure List of Primary Care Physicians. What Every Parent Should Know About Febrile Seizures / AAFP Patient Information Handout Predictors for the Risk of Recurrent Febrile Seizures / Tips From Other Journals - American Family Physician, High Fever Raises Risk of Multiple Febrile Seizures - Children with a history of febrile seizures are more likely to have multiple seizures in a subsequent febrile episode if they are younger and have high temperatures at the onset of and during the course of the fever, a study of 230 children has found. Febrile Seizures - Three to five percent of normal, healthy children suffer a "febrile seizure" or "fever convulsion" (about 1 in 20 children). Typically the child is between 6 months and 5 years old. Febrile seizures occur more frequently in boys.

    7. Febrile Seizures Fact Sheet
    A febrile seizure is a brief, generalized, symmetric convulsion in a child that occurs in association with fever but
    http://www.ninds.nih.gov/health_and_medical/pubs/febrile_seizures.htm
    National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Accessible version Science for the Brain The nation's leading supporter of biomedical research on disorders of the brain and nervous system Browse all disorders Browse all health
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    Febrile Seizures Get Web page suited for printing
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    Table of Contents
  • What are febrile seizures? How common are febrile seizures? What makes a child prone to recurrent febrile seizures? Are febrile seizures harmful? ... Where can I get more information?
    What are febrile seizures?
    Febrile seizures are convulsions brought on by a fever in infants or small children. During a febrile seizure, a child often loses consciousness and shakes, moving limbs on both sides of the body. Less commonly, the child becomes rigid or has twitches in only a portion of the body, such as an arm or a leg, or on the right or the left side only. Most febrile seizures last a minute or two, although some can be as brief as a few seconds while others last for more than 15 minutes. The majority of children with febrile seizures have rectal temperatures greater than 102 degrees F. Most febrile seizures occur during the first day of a child's fever. Children prone to febrile seizures are not considered to have epilepsy, since epilepsy is characterized by recurrent seizures that are not triggered by fever.
  • 8. 1Up Health > Febrile Seizure (children) > Causes, Incidence, And Risk Factors Of
    Comprehesive information on febrile seizure (children) (Seizure fever induced). Febrileseizure (children) Causes, Incidence, and Risk Factors.
    http://www.1uphealth.com/health/febrile_seizure_children_info.html
    1Up Health Febrile seizure (children) Alternative Medicine Clinical Trials ... Health Topics A-Z Search 1Up Health Febrile seizure (children) Information Febrile seizure (children) Causes, Incidence, and Risk Factors Alternative names : Seizure - fever induced Definition : A febrile seizure is a brief, generalized, symmetric convulsion in a child that occurs in association with fever but without any brain or spinal cord infection or neurologic cause.
    Causes, Incidence, and Risk Factors
    A febrile seizure is a generalized tonic-clonic (grand mal) seizure that occurs in some children as a response to a fever . Febrile seizures are usually associated with rapidly rising fevers, and usually occur early in the fever rather than later. The seizure may last a few seconds up to a few minutes (although short seizures are more typical). It most commonly occurs in children between the ages of 6 months and 6 years of age. Approximately 2-5% of children will have a seizure associated with fevers. However, the exact cause of febrile seizures is unknown.
    There is a tendency for febrile seizures to run in families. This suggest thats there are genetic factors involved. Occasionally, seizures associated with fever may be a symptom of other diseases such as poisoning

    9. ThirdAge - Adam - Febrile Seizure (children)
    What Is a febrile seizure? A febrile seizure is a "convulsion" that occurs with a fever. Most children who have febrile seizures will outgrow them by four to five years of age.
    http://www.thirdage.com/health/adam/ency/article/000980.htm
    document.write(''); document.write(''); document.write('<'); document.write('/SCRIPT>'); document.write(''); document.write(''); document.write('<'); document.write('/A>'); document.write('<'); document.write('/NOSCRIPT>'); document.write('<'); document.write('/IFRAME>'); Activities Computers Family Tree Health ... Prevention
    Febrile seizure (children)
    Definition: A febrile seizure is a brief, generalized, symmetric convulsion in a child that occurs in association with fever but without any brain or spinal cord infection or neurologic cause.
    Alternative Names: Seizure - fever induced
    Causes, incidence, and risk factors: A febrile seizure is a generalized tonic-clonic (grand mal) seizure that occurs in some children as a response to a fever . Febrile seizures are usually associated with rapidly rising fevers, and usually occur early in the fever rather than later. The seizure may last a few seconds up to a few minutes (although short seizures are more typical). It most commonly occurs in children between the ages of 6 months and 6 years of age. Approximately 2-5% of children will have a seizure associated with fevers. However, the exact cause of febrile seizures is unknown.
    There is a tendency for febrile seizures to run in families. This suggest thats there are genetic factors involved. Occasionally, seizures associated with fever may be a symptom of other diseases such as poisoning

    10. 1Up Health > Febrile Seizure (children) (Seizure - Fever Induced) Information
    Comprehesive information on febrile seizure (children) (Seizure fever induced). 1UpHealth Diseases Conditions febrile seizure (children).
    http://www.1uphealth.com/health/febrile_seizure_children.html
    1Up Health Alternative Medicine Clinical Trials Health News ... Health Topics A-Z Search 1Up Health Febrile seizure (children) Information Guide Alternative names : Seizure - fever induced Definition : A febrile seizure is a brief, generalized, symmetric convulsion in a child that occurs in association with fever but without any brain or spinal cord infection or neurologic cause.
    Jump to a Section of this Guide Definition
    Causes, Incidence, and Risk Factors

    Symptoms

    Prevention
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    Calling your Health Care Provider

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    11. HealthlinkUSA Febrile Seizure Links
    part of the treatment process. FindWhat. Click here for page 1 offebrile seizure information from the HealthlinkUSA directory.
    http://www.healthlinkusa.com/459ent.htm

    12. Febrile Seizure; Treatment, Prevention, Cure
    febrile seizureSearch information from many of the best febrile seizure healthsites. Quickly find information treatments, prevention, support and more.
    http://www.healthlinkusa.com/content/459.html
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    13. All About Febrile Seizure
    Everything about febrile seizure/ spasm (also named in GERMAN Infektkrampf,Initialkrampf, Zahnkrampf, Gichter, Freisen, Froasen; also named in ENGLISH
    http://home.t-online.de/home/03518309915-0001/fikre.htm
    Everything about febrile seizure/ spasm
    (also named in GERMAN : Infektkrampf, Initialkrampf, Zahnkrampf, Gichter, Freisen, Froasen
    also named in ENGLISH: feverish spasm, febrile convulsion, febrile seizure, fever cramp)
    Created by Silvia and Uwe Guhr (german parents of febrile seizure / spasm children)
    Contents
    Call for help
    of 1995: Febrile seizure thermometer
    Parental information febrile seizure

    Description of febrile spasms suffered by our child

    Preventing a febrile spasm

    Information for/from doctors (1991; today)
    ...
    GERATHERM manufactures this febrile seizure thermometer! Zur Hauptseite (deutsch) last update: 09.03.2002 Uwe_Guhr@t online.de

    14. Febrile Seizure / Spasm
    4. febrile seizure/ SPASM Preventing a febrile spasm. by U.Guhr (fatherof two febrile spasm children). The onset of a febrile spasm
    http://home.t-online.de/home/03518309915-0001/fi4e.htm
    FEBRILE SEIZURE/ SPASM - Preventing a febrile spasm by U.Guhr (father of two febrile spasm children) The onset of a febrile spasm in children becomes ever more likely with an increase in temperature. In order to prevent such an attack, it is normal to take the childÂ’s temperature at short and constant intervals using an approved fever thermometer, and to undertake measures to reduce the fever according to the behaviour of the temperature increase over time. Back to main homepage Last updated: 18.01.2003; Uwe_Guhr@t-online.de ; Thanks to Emma!

    15. Febrile Seizure: From HealthSquare.com
    A complete explanation of febrile seizure including risks, what to expectand when to call the doctor. febrile seizure. WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW.
    http://www.healthsquare.com/mc/fgmc0315.htm
    About Sponsorship Opportunities Questions Comments ... Guide to Medical Care
    Febrile Seizure
    WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW
    A febrile (FEB-rile) seizure (SEE-zhur) is a type of convulsion. It causes your child's face or body to tighten up and jerk or twist. It is the most common type of seizure, and may last from 1 to 10 minutes. Children between 6 months and 2 years are more likely to have a febrile seizure. The seizures do not cause brain damage. Most children will not have another one.
    Causes
    A temperature of about 104 degrees F (40 degrees C) or more. The fever may be the result of an infection.
    Signs/Symptoms
    Jerking or twitching of the arms, legs or face. When a seizure starts, the child may pass out. He or she may not be aware of the jerking. The child may urinate or have a bowel movement without knowing it, or may throw up. After the seizure, the child may seem irritable, confused, or sleepy.
    WHAT YOU SHOULD DO
    • If your child develops a fever, give a sponge bath to try to reduce the fever. The bath should be done in a warm room with warm water. Using a damp washcloth, gently rub the entire body. The child should be damp but not dripping wet. Do not use a fan or ice or cold water, and do not chill the child.
    • During a convulsion, protect the child from injury by moving dangerous objects away. Do not try to hold the child down. Do not put anything in his or her mouth.

    16. Oral Diazepam Reduces The Risk Of Chilhood Febrile Seizure Recurrence
    Oral Diazepam Reduces the Risk of Chilhood febrile seizure RecurrenceFor release Wednesday, July 07, 1993 Back To menu Overview
    http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/pressrelease_febrileseizures_070793.htm

    17. NINDS Febrile Seizures Information Page
    A short information sheet compiled by NINDS, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.Category Health Conditions and Diseases Epilepsy febrile seizure...... children. During a febrile seizure, a child often loses consciousnessand shakes, moving limbs on both sides of the body. Less commonly
    http://www.ninds.nih.gov/health_and_medical/disorders/febrile_seizures.htm
    National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Accessible version Science for the Brain The nation's leading supporter of biomedical research on disorders of the brain and nervous system Browse all disorders Browse all health
    organizations
    More about
    Febrile Seizures
    Studies with patients Research literature Press releases
    Search NINDS... (help) Contact us My privacy NINDS is part of the
    National Institutes of

    Health
    NINDS Febrile Seizures Information Page
    Reviewed 07-01-2001 Get Web page suited for printing
    Email this to a friend or colleague

    Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What are Febrile Seizures?
    Is there any treatment?

    What is the prognosis?
    What research is being done? ... Related NINDS Publications and Information What are Febrile Seizures? Is there any treatment? A child who has a febrile seizure usually doesn't need to be hospitalized. If the seizure is prolonged or is accompanied by a serious infection, or if the source of the infection cannot be determined, a doctor may recommend that the child be hospitalized for observation. Prolonged daily use of oral anticonvulsants, such as phenobarbital or valproate, to prevent febrile seizures is usually not recommended because of their potential for side effects and questionable effectiveness for preventing such seizures. What is the prognosis?

    18. Febrile Seizures: What Every Parent Should Know
    febrile seizures What Every Parent Should Know. What is a febrile seizure? If mychild has a febrile seizure, does this mean that he or she has epilepsy? No.
    http://familydoctor.org/handouts/066.html
    This handout is also available in Spanish. Information
    from Your Family Doctor
    Febrile Seizures: What Every Parent Should Know What is a febrile seizure?
    Most of the time when children have a seizure, or a convulsion, it's caused by a fever. These are called "fever seizures" or "febrile seizures." They are very frightening, but they aren't as dangerous as they may appear. How serious are febrile seizures? Generally, febrile seizures aren't harmful to a child. Even though seeing your child have a febrile seizure is frightening, your child will be okay. A febrile seizure doesn't cause brain damage. Also, your child can't swallow his or her tongue during a seizure. Febrile seizures usually last just a few minutes and go away on their own. It's very unusual for a febrile seizure to last more than 10 minutes. Usually, a child who has had a febrile seizure does not need to be hospitalized and may not need x-rays or a brain wave test. Your child may only need to be seen by your family doctor so the cause of the fever can be found. What should I do if my child has a seizure?

    19. Health Ency.: Disease: Febrile Seizure (children)
    febrile seizure (children) See images. A child who has a febrile seizuremay not have further seizures in response to a fever. Ency.
    http://www.accessatlanta.com/shared/health/adam/ency/article/000980.html
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    Important notice
    Ency. home Disease F Febrile seizure (children) See images Overview Symptoms Treatment ... Prevention Alternative names: Seizure - fever induced Definition: Febrile seizure (children) is a brief, generalized, symmetric convulsion that occurs in association with fever, but without any CNS infection or neurologic cause. Causes and Risks A febrile seizure is a generalized tonic-clonic (grand mal) seizure that occurs in some children as a response to a fever . Febrile seizures are usually associated with rapidly rising fevers, and usually occur early in the fever rather than later. The seizure may last a few seconds up to a few minutes (although short seizures are more typical). It most commonly occurs in children between the ages of 6 months to 6 years of age. Approximately 2-5% of children will have a seizure associated with fevers. However, the exact cause of febrile seizures is unknown.
    There is a tendency for febrile seizures to run in families. This may suggest that there are genetic factors involved. Occasionally, seizures associated with fever may be a symptom of other diseases such as poisoning, meningitis or encephalitis Roseola , or infection with Human herpesvirus-6, is also a frequent cause of febrile convulsions in children. Dysentary caused by Shigella is frequently associated with a high fever and febrile seizures in children. A child who has a febrile seizure may not have further

    20. Febrile Seizures
    Are febrile seizures harmful? * What should be done for a child having a febrileseizure? What should be done for a child having a febrile seizure?
    http://www.pediatricneurology.com/febrile.htm
    [Back to Seizures
    Febrile Seizures
    Reprinted courtesy of:
    National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
    National Institutes of Health Index: * What are febrile seizures? * How common are febrile seizures? * What makes a child prone to recurrent febrile seizures? * Are febrile seizures harmful? * What should be done for a child having a febrile seizure? * How are febrile seizures diagnosed and treated? * How are febrile seizures prevented? * What research is being done on febrile seizures? * Where can I get more information? Febrile seizures are convulsions brought on by a fever in infants or small children. During a febrile seizure, a child often loses consciousness and shakes, moving limbs on both sides of the body. Less commonly, the child becomes rigid or has twitches in only a portion of the body, such as an arm or a leg, or on the right or the left side only. Most febrile seizures last a minute or two, although some can be as brief as a few seconds while others last for more than 15 minutes. The majority of children with febrile seizures have rectal temperatures greater than 102 degrees F. Most febrile seizures occur during the first day of a child's fever.

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