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$1.50
1. Entertainment Weekly March 12
 
$9.95
2. No Mr. Big would be big mistake;
$5.85
3. Chris Noth, actor plays Mister
4. Michael Crichton Value Collection:
5. TV Guide January 3, 2004 Sarah
6. TV Guide October 24, 2005 Geena
$2.65
7. Saving Faith
$194.86
8. The Andromeda Strain
$13.49
9. Kiss the Girls (Alex Cross)

1. Entertainment Weekly March 12 2010 Julianna Margulies and Chris Noth/The Good Wife on Cover, 10 Best TV Shows, Spring TV Preview, Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, Yo Gabba Gabba!
Single Issue Magazine: Pages (2010)
-- used & new: US$1.50
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Asin: B003CS6URO
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2. No Mr. Big would be big mistake; Chris Noth not yet signed to Sex and the City movie as Carrie's flame.(TV - Articles): An article from: Winnipeg Free Press
by Gale Reference Team
 Digital: Pages (2007-07-15)
list price: US$9.95 -- used & new: US$9.95
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Asin: B000TSBXYU
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Editorial Review

Product Description
This digital document is an article from Winnipeg Free Press, published by Thomson Gale on July 15, 2007. The length of the article is 1053 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available in your Amazon.com Digital Locker immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

Citation Details
Title: No Mr. Big would be big mistake; Chris Noth not yet signed to Sex and the City movie as Carrie's flame.(TV - Articles)
Author: Gale Reference Team
Publication: Winnipeg Free Press (Magazine/Journal)
Date: July 15, 2007
Publisher: Thomson Gale
Page: d10

Distributed by Thomson Gale ... Read more


3. Chris Noth, actor plays Mister Big in Sex in the City, Cigar Aficionado magazine, June 2010 issue.
by actor plays Mister Big on Sex in the City, Cigar Aficionado magazine, June 2010 issue. Chris Noth
Paperback: Pages (2010)
-- used & new: US$5.85
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: B003UR05GY
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Editorial Review

Product Description
Monthly magazine focused on the good life for men. ... Read more


4. Michael Crichton Value Collection: Andromeda Strain, Jurassic Park, and The Lost World (The Michael Crichton Collection)
by Michael Crichton
Audio Cassette: Pages (2000-05-02)
list price: US$34.95
Isbn: 0375415807
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
Eight Cassettes, 10 hours

Contains: Andromeda Strain, Jurassic Park, and THE Lost World

The collection is sure to please avid Crichton fans and new listeners alike.These three audios are offered at 40% off the indivial retail price.

ANDROMEDA STRAIN
Read by Chris North

The Andromeda Strain sets forth the story of Project Wildfire - the crash mobilization of the nations highest scientific and medical resources when an unmanned research satellite returns to earth mysteriously and lethally contaminated. Four American scientists are summoned under conditions of total news blackout and utmost urgency to Wildfire's secret laboratory five stories below the Nevada desert. There - surrounded by the most sophisticated computer equipment, and sealed off from the outside world - they work against the threat of a worldwide epidemic. Step by step they begin to unravel the puzzle of the Andromeda Strain until, terrifyingly, their microbacterial adversary ruptures the hypersterile seal of the lab and their already desperate search for a biomedical answer becomes a split second race against time.


JURASSIC PARK
Read by John Heard

A shroud of secrecy covers a privately-owned island off the coast of the Dominican Republic where an American bioengineering firm is quietly building a resort theme park. Even the expert consultants on the project don't know exactly what it is. And local doctors are mystified when an injured park worker arrives at the hospital with gashes on his body, as if he's been mauled by an animal of monstrous proportions. A year later, when the first invited guests to "Jurassic Park" attend a 4-day preview, the amazement, the shock, and finally, the terror they experience there offer a horrifying solution to this disturbing puzzle.

Riveting scientific detail ad a driving, suspenseful narrative make this an unforgettable story - one of advanced technology versus prehistoric monsters . . . and of an extraordinary good idea gone extraordinary bad.

THE LOST WORLD
Read by Anthony Heald

The sequel to Michael Crichton's bestselling Jurassic Park.

It is now six years since the secret disaster at Jurassic Park: six years since that extraordinary dream of science and imagination came to a crashing end - the dinosaurs destroyed, the part dismantled, the island indefinitely closed to the public.

There are rumors that something has survived. ... Read more

Customer Reviews (3)

5-0 out of 5 stars Get all 3 great books for the price of one!
It has been said that 'Jurassic Park' is one of Crichton's best books (if not THE best) and I agree.An absolutely amazing work of original fiction which is written to near perfection.The movie was ripped to shreds by many fans of the novel for having 1-dimensional characters, but you cannot say that about the novel.Crichton breathes life into these people, especially Ian Malcom, easily his greatest creation (and Jeff Goldblum was perfectly cast in the movies I might add).

The idea of resurrecting extinct animals wasn't originated by Crichton, but he is the guy who took the idea and ran with it to the publisher first.I just cannot think of a more compelling idea for a fictional story which bases its original theory on literal facts.The idea of visiting living dinosaurs is facinating beyond words, but Ian Malcom said it best about the process of bringing to life animals that have been dead for millions of years when he said, "You were so interested in discovering whether or not you COULD clone dinosaurs that you never stopped to think if you SHOULD."Quite possibly one of the most entertaining adventure/thrillers ever published.

'The Lost World' in many ways was set up to fail by many even before they read it.How do you top 'Jurassic Park'?Since the total originality of the first book is gone, that takes away a little of the enjoyment, but I believe that Crichton sacrificed nothing with this sequel.Staying true to his original story he wrote a sequel to his book rather than the movie version, making this that much more compelling and entertaining.Never for a minute think that 'The Lost World' isn't as fun in almost every way as the original, because it IS.It is also SO different than the very poor movie that shared the same name.Actually they only shared about 5-10% of the same storyline, enough of a difference to wonder why they didn't come out with a novelized version of the movie.While not his best novel, I found it as exciting as the original and chock full of everything that makes a thriller worthwhile to read in the first place.

I had heard for years that 'The Andromeda Strain' was Crichtons best novel...and this is one area where I disagree. Although being a fun and very good book, it is easy to see how far he has come as an author when you read it.It is very possible that this book inspired a rash of movies which imitated the main plotline of a disease or alien being brought back to earth unknowingly, but one of Crichtons best novels?I don't think so.Still it IS a must read for every fan.

5-0 out of 5 stars Jurassic Park
Jurassic Park is an outstanding book. This is the second time I have read it and it got better.It is interesting becuase companies will probably be able to clone dinosuars like that soon.The book really kept me interested, it really didn't have a low spot.The book kinda tests your ability to understand fiction.At times you have to use a lot of imagination, but even with that it is a real good book.

5-0 out of 5 stars Absolutely great!
All three of these books are absolute winners, and being able to read them without lifting a finger is a plus on its own!Full of action and adventure, all thee titles are sure to keep you o the edge of your seat.You'll never want to stop listening! ... Read more


5. TV Guide January 3, 2004 Sarah Jessica Parker and Chris Noth/Sex and the City, Donald Trump's New Reality Series
Spiral-bound: Pages (2004)

Asin: B002L3VUJ4
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6. TV Guide October 24, 2005 Geena Davis/Commander In Chief, Oprah, Grey's Anatomy, David Krumholtz/Numbers Interview, Chris Noth/Law & Order Criminal Intent
Single Issue Magazine: Pages (2005)

Asin: B002LY8O2E
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7. Saving Faith
by David Baldacci
Audio Cassette: Pages (1999-12-01)
list price: US$25.98 -- used & new: US$2.65
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 1570427690
Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Product Description
It sounds like a movie pitch: "The story is like Tom Clancy crossed with John Grisham set in the Washington D.C. political world." But David Baldacci's Saving Faith successfully fuses elements from both of these chart-busters in this political thriller spiced with techno-wizardry.The villain is a classic spy caricature: cold-war CIA super-patriot Robert Thornhill wants to reclaim the glory days of the Central Intelligence Agency--when money flowed like the Mississippi during a flood, and the FBI watched helplessly from the sidelines. Working from his secret underground bunker, he blackmails Danny Buchanan, one of the great Washington lobbyists, to front an enormous bribery scheme that will force Congress to bend to the CIA's whims. But Thornhill's plan springs a leak: Buchanan's assistant Faith Lockhart discovers her boss's dirty dealings, and she intends to expose the whole mess to Thornhill's nemesis, the FBI. Thornhill's associates attempt to assassinate Faith, but their bullet kills her FBI escort instead. Faith finds herself on the run with Lee Adams, a fit-and-trim PI who had been shadowing her at the behest of Buchanan. If all this sounds a bit confusing, it is at times. Baldacci works hard to keep the tension steadily rising, but it is sometimes difficult to remember why Faith and Lee can't just stop running and go for help. Nevertheless, they are very likable heroes, and Baldacci's depiction of the world of lobbyists and the internecine warfare of the FBI and CIA (complete with state-of-the-art spy gadgets and transmission-proof chambers) elevates the novel with details that can come only from careful research. --Patrick O'KelleyAmazon.com Review
It sounds like a movie pitch: "The story is like Tom Clancy crossed with John Grisham set in the Washington D.C. political world." But David Baldacci's Saving Faith successfully fuses elements from both of these chart-busters in this political thriller spiced with techno-wizardry.

The villain is a classic spy caricature: cold-war CIA super-patriot Robert Thornhill wants to reclaim the glory days of the Central Intelligence Agency--when money flowed like the Mississippi during a flood, and the FBI watched helplessly from the sidelines. Working from his secret underground bunker, he blackmails Danny Buchanan, one of the great Washington lobbyists, to front an enormous bribery scheme that will force Congress to bend to the CIA's whims. But Thornhill's plan springs a leak: Buchanan's assistant Faith Lockhart discovers her boss's dirty dealings, and she intends to expose the whole mess to Thornhill's nemesis, the FBI. Thornhill's associates attempt to assassinate Faith, but their bullet kills her FBI escort instead. Faith finds herself on the run with Lee Adams, a fit-and-trim PI who had been shadowing her at the behest of Buchanan.

If all this sounds a bit confusing, it is at times. Baldacci works hard to keep the tension steadily rising, but it is sometimes difficult to remember why Faith and Lee can't just stop running and go for help. Nevertheless, they are very likable heroes, and Baldacci's depiction of the world of lobbyists and the internecine warfare of the FBI and CIA (complete with state-of-the-art spy gadgets and transmission-proof chambers) elevates the novel with details that can come only from careful research. --Patrick O'Kelley ... Read more

Customer Reviews (187)

5-0 out of 5 stars Saving Faith
I thoroughly enjoyed the book. I am about 80% through all of Baldacci's Books, and this is one of the best.

5-0 out of 5 stars Faith is on the Run
Lobbyist Faith Lockhart and her boss Danny Buchanan have done wonders with their help for the poor in third world nations, but sometimes they bent the rules a bit, legally speaking. Now Faith suspects perhaps Danny may be bending them too much, so she decides to make a deal with the FBI to save both herself and her boss.

However unknown to Faith, Danny has done some deals with the CIA and they don't want her telling the FBI anything. On her way to meet with the Fibby guys, an assassin tries to kill her, luckily she is saved by PI Lee Adams, who has been hired by an anonymous client to follow her. Unfortunately the FBI agent who had been accompanying Faith is killed.

Now, all of a sudden, Faith and Lee are on the run. The don't trust each other, but they have no one else to turn to. The FBI wants them alive, especially agent Brooke Reynolds, who was supposed to be in that car with Faith when the assassin struck, but the CIA apparently wants them dead.

This story is one long chase scene, full of intrigue and government power gone mad. It's a book that I couldn't put down. As usual David Baldacci nails his characters and draws his readers in right from the get go.

2-0 out of 5 stars Book Purchase
Disappointed - the book that was delivered was the large type for easier reading format and I did not know that is what I purchased.I am sure it stated such somewhere but apparently is wasn't too obvious as I wouldn't have purchased the book it I had know.

5-0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Book
This was a fantastic book that was hard to put down.I really enjoyed it.

5-0 out of 5 stars Good Read
I am a Baldacci fan so I'm a pushover for most of what he writes but this book has a slightly different slant.It's packed with action and turnarounds.I would recommend it. ... Read more


8. The Andromeda Strain
by Michael Crichton
Audio CD: Pages (2004-05-04)
list price: US$14.99 -- used & new: US$194.86
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Asin: 0739312251
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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Product Description
"Relentlessly suspenseful...A hair-raising experience."
THE PITTSBURGH PRESS
The United States government stands warned that sterilization procedures for returning space probes may be inadequate to guarantee uncontaminated re-entry to the atmosphere. When a probe satellite falls to the earth two years later, and lands in a desolate area of northeastern Arizona, the bodies that lie heaped and flung across the ground, have faces locked in frozen surprise. The terror has begun....


From the Paperback edition.Amazon.com Review
Some biologists speculate that if we ever make contact withextraterrestrials, those life forms are likely to be--like most lifeon earth--one-celled or smaller creatures, more comparable to bacteriathan little green men. And even though such organisms would not likelybe able to harm humans, the possibility exists that first contactmight be our last.

That's the scientific supposition that MichaelCrichton formulates and follows out to its conclusion in his excellentdebut novel, The Andromeda Strain.

A Nobel-Prize-winningbacteriologist, Jeremy Stone, urges the president to approve anextraterrestrial decontamination facility to sterilize returningastronauts, satellites, and spacecraft that might carry an "unknownbiologic agent." The government agrees, almost too quickly, to buildthe top-secret Wildfire Lab in the desert of Nevada. Shortlythereafter, unbeknownst to Stone, the U.S. Army initiates the "Scoop"satellite program, an attempt to actively collect space pathogens foruse in biological warfare. When Scoop VII crashes a couple years laterin the isolated Arizona town of Piedmont, the Army ends up gettingmore than it asked for.

The Andromeda Strain follows Stoneand rest of the scientific team mobilized to react to the Scoop crashas they scramble to understand and contain a strange and deadlyoutbreak. Crichton's first book may well be his best; it has anearnestness that is missing from his later, more calculatedthrillers. --Paul Hughes ... Read more

Customer Reviews (388)

5-0 out of 5 stars "There isn't anything in the world . . . "
THE ANDROMEDA STRAIN was written while Michael Crichton was in medical school. Arguably, this is his best book, written at the height of the U.S. Space Program, and guaranteed to terrify the reader with its tale of an unmanageable pathogen from beyond the Earth.

Written as a real documentary report, Crichton manages to impart significant information about Chemical-Bacteriological Warfare, epidemiology, hot zone protocols, computerized patient diagnosis, hemotology, and much else to his readers while still entertaining us.

It may be that his supersecret pathogen laboratory, "Wildfire" isn't real, but it could be, and so could virtually anything else between these covers, which is why THE ANDROMEDA STRAIN still inspires chills forty years after its publication. The 1971 movie The Andromeda Strain is a worthy effort, but read the book first.

3-0 out of 5 stars A decent techno-thriller, though it does have some issues
The Andromeda Strain was my second venture into Crichton's work, the first being Sphere. Though I did like it a bit more than Sphere, it still didn't really pull me in as much as I thought it might.

Andromeda Strain is about an extraterrestrial microorganism that comes to Earth via 'Scoop' satellite that is placed just in orbit, right around the highest levels of Earth's atmosphere. The satellite prematurely crashes right near Piedmont, a small town in Arizona. This unknown microorganism causes all but two people in Piedmont to meet their maker. It is the job of a small team of scientists to unravel the mysteries of this microorganism. Isolated, in an underground facility the scientists go to work.

I found most of this book to be at least mildly interesting. The plot seems somewhat plausible on the surface (even if it really isn't). The ending is a bit of a deus ex machina and some of the plot devices are entirely too clich├ęd (the clock ticking down to ultimate destruction for instance). There are also elements that are way too contrived though I won't discuss them here because it would spoil an important aspect of the plot.

In the end, it was entertaining enough to keep my bookmark moving.

4-0 out of 5 stars The book that started it all for Crichton
"The Andromeda Strain" was Michael Crichton's first novel, and it basically served as the foundation for his illustrious career. He could develop a serious crisis unlike any other, but it wasn't just the suspense and action that made his novels so great; it was also the unique characters he created and the way they evolved throughout his stories. Also, Crichton's narrative was at times very informative and free-flowing in ways that could almost be read like a work of non-fiction within the fictional story he was telling, and it helped bring the characters and events in his books to life. "The Andromeda Strain" is a great example of this.

Bacteriologist Jeremy Stone, along with a group of other scientists, are working in, what was then, a technologically advanced, state-of-the-art facility as they try diligently to unravel the mystery behind this extraterrestrial bacteria that came to earth via a satellite that had been launched by the army a couple years earlier. The satellite crash-landed near a small town in Arizona called Piedmont, and the bacteria quickly spread like a virus, killing all but two people in the town: a crying baby and a strange old man. The scientists find themselves encountering many problems in their facility as they try figuring out how these two people survived and how this deadly virus can be stopped before it kills them and spreads throughout the country.


The ending is somewhat anticlimactic, and there are parts of the story that read at a slow pace as Crichton describes things like scientific theories regarding bacteria from outer space and the now outdated technology being used in the facility. As a result, the book didn't seem quite as suspenseful as it could've been. Overall though, Crichton did a great job handling the mystery elements in this intriguing and unpredictable story, and he did a pretty good job with the character development as well. "The Andromeda Strain" is very well written, especially for an author's first novel. I guess that's not surprising though. Crichton always wrote like a veteran, and it seemed like he always knew exactly what he was doing. This book is no exception.

5-0 out of 5 stars Sci Fi Classic & Cautionary Tale
I have read and re-read this book many times, I've seen the movie and TV series. This is absolutely one of the best tales of science getting out of control. A space probe is sent to seek organisms that can be used for germ or biological warfare. The quest is far more successful than the government wants and things go down hill from there.

Crichton graduate from Harvard Med school, so he has the educational and technological background to make this entirely plausible and absoultely frightening. He has excellent writing skills, making what could have been a dull accounting of science and medicine into an emotional thriller that keeps you interested, building tension until the very end.

You may have heard of some of his other works: Congo, Sphere, Jurrassic Park, Rising Sun to name a few. A brilliant mind - his fiction often has footnotes and factual sources the reader can pursue to follow up on the facts.

5-0 out of 5 stars An Odyssey of Timeless Possibilities
Michael Crichton's first novel, "The Andromeda Strain", is an odyssey of timeless possibilities. The classic 1971 film vision, The Andromeda Strain (directed by Robert Wise), unfortunately could not include all of Crichton's little gems buried within the narrative of the text. The first time I tried reading the novel I couldn't get into the story, but recently I started over and actually forced myself to read the whole book. But this time it wasn't difficult once I got past the first parts and found myself compulsively reading it. I don't know what I was thinking the first time, but this book is exciting for the mind and still has much to offer even today.

The plot begins a little too slowly perhaps, but once the wave of ideas start coming it is a thoughtful and intelligent read. If you like his Jurassic Park, then this is an excellent novel to read for similar arguments about our human flaws. Like in "Jurassic Park", he questions the evolutionary and survival value of human intelligence. Are we too smart and powerful for our own good? Are we self-destructive like a ticking time bomb? All of these questions made famous by "Jurassic Park" get their start in this novel (Crichton's first). Besides his usual warnings against us humans trying to act as if we can control and manipulate nature without producing unknown, unpredictable, and potentially disastrous side effects, there are many other little gems for the imagination that I found even more interesting (and no I didn't find the Odd Man Hypothesis the most interesting idea).

Here are a few highlights to try to capture my meaning and point out all the excellent questions and SF possibilities mentioned in the text (most of which were not in the movie):

1. What sort of alien life are we likely to meet? It includes a table summarizing the odds of encountering certain types of alien life. The numbers indicate that we are most likely to discover non-complex and non-intelligent life. I found this interesting because Stephen Hawking notes a similar idea in his popular science book, The Universe in a Nutshell; he suggests that we are most likely to encounter lifeforms that are either less intelligent or much more intelligent than us.

2. What is life? He expresses skepticism over defining life in perfectly clear terms. Yes, most (if not all) definitions of life have counterexamples (just like almost all non-mathematical definitions)!

3. Could our first encounter come from below? He suggests a fascinating possibility that intelligent life might exist at tiny scales. Could we examine a piece of space debris under a microscope and see a message of greetings and peace from little aliens? Perhaps continuing trends of the miniaturization of technology would allow these little aliens to harness extreme types of power, at least for their size.

4. Would microorganisms from outer space be likely to harm us, or is it more likely that our environment will harm them? Bacteria on earth rarely exists in forms that are dangerous to humans, for over time microorganisms and humans co-evolved with each other and built immunities to each other. If a bacteria was too harmful and killed its host, then it is unlikely to survive in abundance.

4a. Though this means we are dependent on our 'good bugs' (our good bacteria) and we could be in danger if left 'naked' to our environment (the way an advanced alien life form would be, as H. G. Wells nicely used in The War of the Worlds (Modern Library Classics)). For example, Crichton discusses a kind of super-curing drug that could cure cancer completely by destroying all of one's microorganisms - including important ones in the stomach. Sounds great, but it would create the nasty side effect of undoing years of evolution and producing a quick death by some odd infection (that evolution regularly defends us against). So perhaps the odds are higher that bacteria will harm humans (or any life form) when man (or the life form) is stripped of centuries of co-evolution and left bare to the elements.

5. Is life as we know it 'normal' or could there be lifeforms very different? It speculates that an alien life form might use very different life-processes, such as not using amino acids (which we find in just about all life forms). Perhaps some sort of crystal life-processes could replace the 'normal' biological functions we observe on earth, and perhaps these processes would help equip such an alien life form to survive in space, travel the stars, meet new lifeforms, and seed new civilizations. Carl Sagan has an interesting discussion of life in his Cosmos: Carl Sagan (7 DVD Set) series and he suggests that carbon is essential for his classification of life, but Crichton is much more liberal about new life (in the tradition of Star Trek).

6. Would an atypical life form find other 'atypical' environments better for healthy life-functioning? Crichton points out that some forms of life survive best in very different environments than humans. Some live in the deep ocean in high pressure. So it may be possible that some lifeforms would survive best above the oxygen atmosphere of Earth. In the story, several scoops orbit the earth in search of microorganisms for the development of biological weapons.

7. Last on my list but not least -- How could an advanced civilization explore the universe within the constraints of vast distances, immense time intervals, and the rigors of space travel? One exciting option is that an advanced civilization might choose to send out microbiological organisms that adapt well to deep space. These microorganisms could announce the existence of their civilization and contact other life around the universe. And perhaps, just maybe, these organisms would have the ability to replicate and reproduce once they land in the right environment. They might even grow into a full life form, examine any life forms found in its area, and greet new life and new civilizations! How could they not put that into the movie!

The plot nicely weaves these seven questions into the story. The story is similar to the one in the movie. A group of scientists get a call to action to study a new microorganism scooped from an orbit around the earth. The scientists must find a way to defeat the deadly microorganism before it spreads, but many of their safety precautions produce unpredicted side effects. So they also have to battle against the limits of their humanity as well. They spend an immense amount of time decontaminating, and they go over the Odd Man Hypothesis in which studies show that a single person makes the right decisions more often than a married person. The Odd Man would have to decide whether to explode the entire facility if the microorganism gets out of control; and, by the way, only the Odd Man can turn off the count down to detonation.

I found the story surprisingly full of ideas, as if the author took his time and took great care to produce a near masterpiece. Some of his other stories seem too stock. Some of his stories carry along one or two interesting ideas near the end. But then he has "Jurassic Park" and "The Andromeda Strain" -- my two favorites by far. I also love Prey for a couple ideas but I didn't find it nearly as filled with gems as "The Andromeda Strain". I highly suggest this novel even though it was a little difficult for me to get into initially and science has probably advanced quite a bit since it was written. But the vision of the text and many imaginative possibilities seem very well intact (if not timeless). ... Read more


9. Kiss the Girls (Alex Cross)
by James Patterson
Audio CD: Pages (2005-11-01)
list price: US$17.98 -- used & new: US$13.49
(price subject to change: see help)
Asin: 159483119X
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
Canada | United Kingdom | Germany | France | Japan
Editorial Review

Product Description
"We begin with Alex Cross, the detective introduced in ALONG CAME A SPIDER. He's back, and this time it's personal. Alex's favorite niece, Naomi, a beautiful young woman, disappears from school at Duke University. The trail of evidence points to Wylie, a serial killer who takes sexual perversion to new heights.Wylie works in the Chapel Hill and Durham area of the South; his partner in depravity, Rudolph, finds his women in and around southern California. They are both serial freaks who have learned that there's strength in numbers. KISS THE GIRLS is about a secret sexual obsession of many men, and the nightmare of every woman in America. It is about a killer who takes women off the streets, who possesses them, subjugates them, keeps them captive, and murders many of them for ""disobedience.""Alex Cross encounters in the new South the most horrifying serial criminal in history. Eventually, it is believed that hundreds of women disappeared over a ten-year period. KISS THE GIRLS -- it's a roller-coaster, so hang on!" ... Read more

Customer Reviews (371)

5-0 out of 5 stars I LOVED THIS BOOK!
I could not put this book down!Kiss The Girls transformed me into a James Patterson fanatic!

5-0 out of 5 stars Kiss the Girls
The following has been presented to you spoiler free. (:

Let me just start off by saying this is the novel Swimsuit (by the same author) tried to be, but failed miserably. If you really want to hear my rant on that book, check out my review of it.

I waited a long time before reading this book. Mainly because I wasn't that impressed with the first book in this series, Along Came a Spider. But I'm so glad I did. This is by far my favorite James Patterson book that I've read so far.

It follows two pattern killers, Casanova and The Gentleman (oh, James Patteron and his nicknames for every single one of his antagonists), who abduct young women who are perfect in every way. They torture, rape, kill, and do every other horrific thing to them. And of course, Alex Cross takes the case because his niece, Naomi, was one of the girls that was taken.

This book is definitely gruesome. Especially a certain snake scene. If I may relate it to Swimsuit again, it has the same gross-out factor, but the story around Kiss the Girls is much more complex and fleshed out than Swimsuit was. So, if you can get through all the killing and rape scenes, this book is fabulous.

The plot is complex and interesting, as well. The storyline is unlike anything I've ever read before. And since it was written a good fifteen years ago, I'm sure it was the first of its kind. But if it wasn't, I don't really care, I loved it anyway.

Don't get me wrong, there were some things about this book that irked me. The fact that Kate (one of the victims) could fall for Alex not a week after being raped and tortured is completely unbelievable. Kate, if you're looking for a excuse to swear off men forever, you have one of the best reasons in the world. Also, the scenes with Alex's children are way too sugar-coated. James Patterson wrote two of the most angelic kids ever created. They were really bothersome. Thankfully, these things didn't bother me enough to keep me from enjoying the story completely.

Overall, I highly reccommend this book. I would read the first in the series, Along Came a Spider, before reading this one, however. It does reference events in that book quite a lot, especially towards the end.

4-0 out of 5 stars A Fast-Paced Thriller
Beautiful young women have been disappearing in North Carolina and Los Angeles at an alarming rate, and some are turning up dead. So when Washington D.C. Detective Alex Cross's niece goes missing from Durham, he heads down there, determined to find her, without or without local police support. For a while, there is no support, which is why is good friend, Detective John Sampson, decides to help him. Alex is soon taunted by a killer calling himself Casanova, but he's not the only murderer aware of Alex. So is the LA serial killer known as The Gentleman Caller. Complicating things further is Alex's growing attachment to a young intern who's met Casanova in person and has good reason to fear for her life.

I'm not sure it was James Patterson's intention to create a story so strongly associated with the number two, but it struck me that two pairs of detectives are looking for Casanova, Alex has two children, and there are two serial killers at large. Whether this is significant or not probably depends on how closely you analyze the pairs' relationships.

Kiss the Girls is a fast-paced page-turner that had me totally engrossed until the lack of logic in places became irritating. To divulge where and why the logic didn't work would give too much away, but these absences made the story too contrived at times. Still, the suspense kept me reading to the satisfying conclusion.

Debra
Fatal Encryption (Alex Bellamy mystery)
Taxed to Death (1st in Alex Bellamy Series)

5-0 out of 5 stars Great Alex Cross book of the series
I've read up thru The Big Bad Wolf - this one was my favorite - Kept me on the edge of my seat....

5-0 out of 5 stars Char from Alabama
Excellent Service.I enjoyed the James Patterson Alex Cross series that I ordered more of the series. ... Read more


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