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         Beryllium Disease:     more detail
  1. Chronic beryllium disease and sensitization at a beryllium processing facility.(Research/ Environmental Medicine): An article from: Environmental Health Perspectives by Kenneth Rosenman, Vicki Hertzberg, et all 2005-10-01
  2. Beryllium Disease: A Summary of the Occupational Health Concern by Renzo Bertolini, 1989
  3. ANALYSES OF FACTORS IN BERYLLIUM ASSOCIATED DISEASES by M.D. John F. Zielinski, 1962
  4. Managing Health Effects of Beryllium Exposure by Committee on Beryllium Alloy Exposures, Committee on Toxicology, et all 2008-09-30
  5. Report on the beryllium problem: As discussed at the sixth Saranac Symposium, Saranac Lake, N.Y., 27 September to 3 October, 1947 by W. E Park, 1947
  6. Beryllium toxicity (Case studies in environmental medicine) by Dennis M Green, 1997

21. Environ Health Perspect 102-6-7, 1994: Beryllium: A Chronic Problem
Discusses uses of beryllium in industry, chronic beryllium disease, genetic testing for beryllium disease, and the incidence of the disease in the workforce.
http://ehpnet1.niehs.nih.gov/docs/1994/102-6-7/focus.html
Environmental Health Perspectives, Volume 102, Number 6-7, June-July 1994 Citation in PubMed Related Articles
Beryllium: A Chronic Problem
What seest thou else in the dark backward and abysm of time?
Shakespeare, The Tempest Ubiquitous Beryllium additive to glass, ceramic, plastics
aircraft engines and brakes
brass alloys
camera shutters
dental prostheses
electrical relays
golf clubs
gyroscopes
microelectronics
microwave devices military vehicle armor mirrors missile guidance systems nonsparking tools nuclear reactors pen clips personal computers precision instruments rockets satellites springs structural material in space technology submarine cable housings transistor mountings wheels x-ray tubes Principal uses of beryllium stem from the discovery in the 1920s that an addition of only 2% beryllium to copper results in an alloy six times stronger than copper. beryllium-copper alloys withstand high temperatures, are extraordinarily hard, resistant to corrosion, do not spark, and are nonmagnetic. These alloys are used in many critical moving parts of aircraft engines, in key components of precision instruments, electrical relays, and switches. Beryllium-copper hammers, wrenches, and other nonsparking tools are used in the petroleum industry where sparks from steel might cause explosions. In the electronics industry, including personal computers, Beryllium-copper alloys are found in integrated circuit sockets and electronic connectors. An alloy of 25% beryllium has some limited use in camera shutters. Beryllium-copper alloys are also used in golf clubs, springs, pivots, wheels, pinions, submarine cable housings, and dental prostheses.

22. Beryllium Worker Medical Surveillance Program
The Y12 Plant Beryllium Worker Medical Surveillance Program was established todetermine the prevalence of chronic beryllium disease at the Oak Ridge Y- 12
http://www.dimensional.com/~mhj/bwmsp.html
Beryllium Worker Medical Surveillance Program The Y-12 Plant Beryllium Worker Medical Surveillance Program was established to determine the prevalence of chronic beryllium disease at the Oak Ridge Y- 12 Plant and replicate work by the National Jewish Center on the predictive value of the peripheral blood lymphocyte proliferation test in identifying early chronic beryllium disease. The Program is operated by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). A roster of over 3,000 living current and former beryllium workers has been constructed based on Plant records. A questionnaire has been administered to over 6,400 current employees to identify those who believe they were exposed to beryllium and to obtain work history and respiratory disease symptoms data. All medical services are provided by subcontracts, except the peripheral blood lymphocyte proliferation test, which is performed by ORISE. In 1991, two Y-12 Plant beryllium workers who had been diagnosed with other lung diseases were determined to have chronic beryllium disease. In 1993, 146 current beryllium workers were provided a the blood lymphocyte proliferation test for immunologic sensitivity to beryllium. Seven cases of chronic beryllium disease were diagnosed among those with abnormal blood test results. Since 1993, 1151 former beryllium workers agreed to participate, 73 have been found to be abnormal, 16 cases of chronic beryllium disease has been diagnosed, 20 do not have chronic beryllium disease, 4 have had equivocal results and 30 others have declined or are scheduled receive diagnostic medical examinations.

23. Toledoblade.com
Article in Toledo Blade about industry and defense alliance that effectively kept beryllium workers from being protected against chronic beryllium disease.
http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/artikkel?Avis=TO&Dato=19990329&

24. Chronic Beryllium Disease: Diagnosis And Management
Chronic beryllium disease Diagnosis and Management. Milton D. Rossman.Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, Hospital of the University
http://ehpnet1.niehs.nih.gov/docs/1996/Suppl-5/rossmanabs.html
Conference on Beryllium-related Diseases
Environmental Health Perspectives 104, Supplement 5, October 1996 Citation in PubMed Related Articles
Chronic Beryllium Disease: Diagnosis and Management
Milton D. Rossman Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Abstract
Chronic beryllium disease is predominantly a pulmonary granulomatosis that was originally described in 1946. Symptoms usually include dyspnea and cough. Fever, anorexia, and weight loss are common. Skin lesions are the most common extrathoracic manifestation. Granulomatous hepatitis, hypercalcemia, and kidney stones can also occur. Radiographic and physiologic abnormalities are similar to those in sarcoidosis. While traditionally the pathologic changes included granulomas and cellular interstitial changes, the hallmark of the disease today is the well-formed granuloma. Immunologic studies have demonstrated a cell-mediated response to beryllium that is due to an accumulation of CD4 T cells at the site of disease activity. Diagnosis depends on the demonstration of pathologic changes (i.e., granuloma) and evidence that the granuloma was caused by a hypersensitivity to beryllium (i.e., positive lung proliferative response to beryllium). Using these criteria, the diagnosis of chronic beryllium disease can now be made before the onset of clinical symptoms. Whether, with early diagnosis, the natural course of this condition will be the same as when it was traditionally diagnosed is not known. Currently, corticosteroids are used to treat patients with significant symptoms or evidence of progressive disease.

25. Chronic Beryllium Disease And Other Beryllium-Related Diseases And Medical Issue
Describes Berylliumrelated diseases and other Beryllium-related medicalissues, including chronic beryllium disease or berylliosis.
http://www.chronicberylliumdisease.com/medical/med_bediseases.htm

Chronic beryllium disease (CBD or berylliosis)
The Department of Health and Human Services Environmental Protection Agency CBD Symptoms:
  • Cough Shortness of breath Fever Fatigue Night sweats Loss of appetite Skin rash (sometimes)
Chronic beryllium disease (berylliosis or CBD)
Diseases Due to Inorganic Dusts
The average time from first beryllium exposure to the development of CBD symptoms (the latency period) can be a few months or as long as forty years ( Medfacts Testing treated Acute beryllium disease
Acute beryllium disease (ABD) is caused by breathing in relatively high concentrations of beryllium in dust and metal fumes ( Medfacts Skin Irritation
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home beryllium defined exposure ... about us This web site is sponsored by the law firm of for educational purposes. Please see our

26. Recent Research In Chronic Beryllium Disease
Recent Research in Chronic beryllium disease. July 27? 2001 ¬óRecent beryllium research topics include medical techniques for
http://www.chronicberylliumdisease.com/news/nw_072701-beryantigen.htm
Recent Research in Chronic Beryllium Disease chronic beryllium disease Factors in Chronic Beryllium Disease
Chest Medical Surveillance for Chronic Beryllium Disease
blood beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT)
The results showed that beryllium sensitization can occur as early as within 50 days of first exposure. The researchers concluded the blood BeLPT should be used repeatedly and serially in beryllium disease surveillance to capture new or missed cases of sensitization and disease. Printer friendly version home beryllium defined exposure ... about us This web site is sponsored by the law firm of for educational purposes. Please see our

27. OSH Answers: Beryllium Disease
What is beryllium disease? What is acute beryllium disease?What is chronic beryllium disease? beryllium disease.
http://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/diseases/beryllium.html
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Beryllium Disease What is beryllium disease? What is acute beryllium disease? What is chronic beryllium disease? What are the industrial uses of beryllium? ... How can we prevent beryllium disease? OSH Answers Feedback Printer Friendly Layout Inquiries Service
The Inquiries Service at CCOHS answers questions on the health or safety concerns people have about the work they do. More on Inquiries Service
Printer Friendly Layout Beryllium Disease
What is beryllium disease?
Beryllium disease is the term used to describe various conditions resulting from exposure to beryllium and its compounds or alloys. These conditions can be grouped into acute beryllium disease and chronic beryllium disease Depending on how workers are exposed, the diseases can affect different tissues and organs. Breathing in fumes or dusts of beryllium compounds may injure the lungs. Direct contact with beryllium fumes or dusts may injure the exposed areas of the body, such as the eyes or the skin. Beryllium may also affect such organs as the liver, kidneys, heart, nervous system, and the lymphatic system, which carries water, white blood cells and proteins to the blood. What is acute beryllium disease?

28. Unmasking The Mysteries Of Chronic Beryllium Disease
Unmasking the mysteries of chronic beryllium disease. New tests identifysensitivity, genetic susceptibility. Beryllium is a unique
http://www.eurekalert.org/features/doe/2001-06/danl-utm061302.php

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Unmasking the mysteries of chronic beryllium disease
New tests identify sensitivity, genetic susceptibility
Beryllium is a unique lightweight metal used in nuclear weapons and, in the commercial sector, for telescope mirrors, golf clubs and a variety of other applications. While solid beryllium and beryllium alloys are safe, fine particulate beryllium is hazardous if inhaled. In certain individuals, breathing microscopic beryllium particles can lead to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD), sometimes called berylliosis. CBD is a long-duration, allergic-type lung response that can make the sufferer abnormally weak and is sometimes fatal. Research into beryllium health effects in the Bioscience Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory center on identifying worker sensitivity and increased risk caused by genetic factors. Only a small percentage of people exposed to beryllium become sensitized to it, meaning they experience an immune-system reaction to exposure. In addition, it appears that not everyone who is sensitized develops CBD. A team led by Bioscience Division researcher Babs Marrone has devised an improved Lymphocyte Proliferation Test, or LPT, a blood test that can identify sensitized individuals. The researchers also have found genetic markers that indicate increased susceptibility.

29. Notice To Former Workers About Beryllium Disease Testing
Notice to Former Workers. About beryllium disease Testing. If you werean Ames Laboratory employee prior to the mid1950s, you should
http://www.ameslab.gov/BEnotice.htm
Notice to Former Workers About Beryllium Disease Testing If you were an Ames Laboratory employee prior to the mid-1950s, you should be receiving a letter from the Department of Energy inviting you to have a blood test to determine if you are sensitized to beryllium. Beryllium was known to be used in Gilman Hall and in Wilhelm Hall on the Iowa State University campus as part of work conducted in support of the Manhattan Project and as post-war work to improve the purification and processing of uranium and thorium. Some people who may have been exposed to beryllium or beryllium compounds during that period may develop chronic beryllium disease, or CBD. People are exposed to beryllium through inhalation of beryllium mists, dusts or fumes. The disease affects the lungs, but can be treated. If you were a non-Ames Laboratory ISU employee working in Gilman Hall during this same time period, you also should be receiving a letter from the DOE. In addition, if you know of any former Ames Lab or ISU employees who may have been exposed to beryllium, please pass this information along to them. Please follow the instructions in the letter if you want to proceed with the blood test. If you have any questions, call the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education toll free at 1-866-812-6703. ORISE is operating the Former Beryllium Workers Medical Surveillance Program for DOE. You can visit the ORISE Web site at

30. Ames Laboratory Beryllium Factsheet
to beryllium dust or fumes during machining and manufacturing operations may developsensitivity to beryllium or, ultimately, chronic beryllium disease, or CBD
http://www.ameslab.gov/BEfactsh.htm
Ames Laboratory Beryllium Factsheet What is beryllium? Beryllium is a hard, lightweight metal that is very strong and easy to shape. It has many industrial uses. Beryllium-copper alloys and beryllium-oxide ceramics are used in the electronic, nuclear and aerospace programs. Beryllium parts for nuclear weapons were manufactured and used at a number of Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories. This manufacturing process continues at some laboratories today. What is the Former Beryllium Workers Medical Surveillance Program? How many DOE laboratories/facilities are involved in the program? The medical surveillance program is operating at more than 20 DOE sites, including Rocky Flats in Colorado, Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, Hanford in Washington, Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California. The Burlington Assembly Plant in Burlington, Iowa, was also known to have handled beryllium. Is the Ames Laboratory included in the list of sites where beryllium was handled? Yes. Beryllium was used at the Ames Laboratory in the 1940s and early 1950s. In the 1940s, it was used in the processes developed at the Laboratory for the production of highly pure uranium and thorium for the historic Manhattan Project. Ames Lab metallurgists also worked on a process to produce pure beryllium metal from beryllium fluoride. In the early 1950s, beryllium-oxide powder was used to produce beryllium shapes and crucibles. The toxicity of beryllium was not well known until after WWII when greater efforts were made to minimize exposure. Present-day buildings in which purification work would have occurred include Wilhelm Hall and Gilman Hall on the Iowa State University (ISU) campus.

31. What Is Chronic Beryllium Disease?
Chronic beryllium disease, or CBD, is an inflammation in the lungs that can occurwhen a person is exposed to respirable beryllium fumes, dusts or powder, and
http://www.befacts.com/cbd/
Chronic beryllium disease, or CBD, is an inflammation in the lungs that can occur when a person is exposed to respirable beryllium fumes, dusts or powder, and subsequently demonstrates an allergic reaction to beryllium. CBD is an occupational disease that may occur in the manufacture of metallic beryllium, beryllium oxide ceramic, or alloys containing beryllium. It was first identified more than 50 years ago. Not everyone who is exposed to beryllium fumes, dusts or powder will develop CBD; most people do not . Researchers now believe that the tendency to develop CBD is genetically determined and results from an allergic sensitivity. Some individuals develop an allergy to beryllium upon exposure and are, therefore, more likely to develop CBD. Some people who are diagnosed with CBD do not develop clinical symptoms at all. In others, the disease can lead to clinical symptoms that include scarring and damage of lung tissue, causing shortness of breath, wheezing and/or coughing. Extreme cases of CBD can cause disability or death. The course of the disease can range from a few years to decades. Home What is Beryllium?

32. Beryllium Facts: Bibliography
Brush Wellman, Code of Safe Work Practices 78, 1972. Brush Wellman, Statementof Current Knowledge on Chronic beryllium disease, Aug. 1995.
http://www.befacts.com/biblio.html
Bibliography
38 Federal Register 66, April 6, 1973. 53 Federal Register 20960, 1988. 54 Fed. Reg. 2331, corrected at 54 Fed. Reg. 2331, 1989. 58 Fed. Register 35512, 35515-24, July 1, 1993. Toxicological Profile for Beryllium American Industrial Hygiene Association, Beryllium and Compounds, American National Standards Institute, Acceptable Concentrations of Beryllium and Beryllium Compounds, Brush Wellman, Air Sampling Program , May 18, 1950. Brush Wellman, Code of Safe Work Practices Brush Wellman, Statement of Current Knowledge on Chronic Beryllium Disease, Aug. 1995. Chemical Substance TLV Committee, American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, Beryllium and Compounds The Committee on Technologies for Preparing Beryllium Metal, National Materials Advisory Board, NMAB-452, Beryllium Metal Supply Options, Deodhar, Sharad D. , et al. "A Study of the Immunologic Aspects of Chronic Berylliosis," 63

33. Brayton Purcell: Chronic Beryllium Disease
fact that there is no known safe level of beryllium exposure and that minimal exposuresto beryllium have been shown to cause chronic beryllium disease (CBD or
http://www.braytonlaw.com/practiceareas/beryllium.htm
Beryllium Exposure
Beryllium is a rare element that is extracted from the earth, refined and reduced to a very fine powder. Its properties of light weight, high tensile strength and ability to slow neutrons have made it useful for many purposes in many industries. Common workplace forms of beryllium are beryllium oxide powder, beryllium ceramics and beryllium copper alloy. Because of the dangers associated with exposure to beryllium, the Atomic Energy Commission adopted a limit for workplace beryllium exposure. These exposure levels are extraordinarily low and reflect the fact that there is no known safe level of beryllium exposure and that minimal exposures to beryllium have been shown to cause chronic beryllium disease (CBD or berylliosis) in susceptible individuals. Even household family members of individuals who work with beryllium can develop CBD from exposure to dust on a worker's clothing. ( The Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 (H.R. 5408)

34. Beryllium Injuries Lawyers Brayton Purcell: Beryllium Workers And Chronic Beryll
Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 (HR 5408) establishes a program to compensatecovered employees who suffer from beryllium disease, chronic silicosis
http://www.braytonlaw.com/news/legalnews/120100-beryllium.htm
Legal News:
Government to Compensate Injured Beryllium WorkersIs It Enough?
With the signing of H.R. 5408 into law this past October, the question that anyone who has worked with or around beryllium should ask is whether the payment of $150,000 is adequate compensation for beryllium related injuries. The Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 (H.R. 5408) establishes a program to compensate covered employees who suffer from beryllium disease, chronic silicosis, or cancer caused by radiation with a lump sum payment of $150,000 for disability and future associated medical expenses. Covered employees are those individuals who were employed by the Department of Energy (DOE), its contractors and subcontractors, companies that provided beryllium to DOE, and atomic weapons employers. If the worker is deceased, the lump sum will be provided to survivors. This compensation program will become effective unless alternative legislation is enacted prior to July 31, 2001. The Act also provides that the DOE must assist workers with state workers' compensation claims. The statute calls for the President to submit to Congress a proposal for legislation to implement the compensation program by March 15, 2001. He must make specific recommendations that include the types of compensation and benefits to be provided, and any adjustment or modifications necessary to administer the compensation program. He also must decide whether to expand the compensation program to include other illnesses associated with toxic exposure and whether to expand the class of individuals who are considered special members of the group exposed to beryllium, which presently includes workers at Paducah, Kentucky, Portsmouth, Ohio or Oak Ridge, Tennessee facilities.

35. Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program
On November 24, 1999, the Secretary of Energy, Bill Richardson, signed a finalrule establishing the Chronic beryllium disease Prevention Program.
http://www.oha.doe.gov/beryllium.htm
The Office of Hearings and Appeals
Will Handle Dispute Resolution On November 24, 1999, the Secretary of Energy, Bill Richardson, signed a final rule establishing the Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program. The rule creates Part 850 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Under section 850.5, the Office of Hearings and Appeals will resolve disputes that arise under the program. This section appears on page 68906 of the Federal Register notice, which you can see by clicking here To find out more about the Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program, visit its web site by clicking here

36. Beryllium Disease Among Workers In A Spacecraft- Manufacturing Plan
beryllium disease among Workers in a Spacecraft Manufacturing Plant California. Epidemicchronic beryllium disease among scrap metal refiners.
http://www.cdc.gov/epo/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00000125.htm
August 19, 1983 / 32(32);419-20,425
Beryllium Disease among Workers in a Spacecraft- Manufacturing Plant California
From 1977 to 1981, three cases of beryllium disease (berylliosis) among workers in a large spacecraft-manufacturing plant in California, were reported to the Beryllium Case Registry (BCR) of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). All three patients were machinists who had worked with beryllium metal from the late 1950s to the mid-1970s, fabricating special parts for missile guidance systems. Laboratory tests in January 1980 showed a hemoglobin level of 16.1 g. White blood cell count was 6,100, with a normal differential. Sputum tests were negative for fungi and acid-fast bacilli. Measurements of arterial blood gases showed a pH of 7.42, PCO((2)) of 36 mm Hg, PO((2)) of 69, and oxygen saturation of 93%. Pulmonary function tests showed moderate reduction of vital capacity and total lung capacity and marked reduction of forced expiratory volume and diffusing capacity. Pathologic examination of biopsied mediastinal lymph nodes revealed non-caseating granuloma and chronic interstitial pneumonitis. A lymphoblast transformation test (LTT) conducted in 1981 was positive. The patient was first employed in 1956 as a milling machinist. He worked with beryllium metal and alloys from 1960 through the mid-1970s at three different plants of this company, two of which have been closed. According to the industrial protocol, such machining was to be done wet or under high-efficiency, local-exhaust ventilation. However, the patient stated that at times there was sufficient spillage of dusts to require vacuuming. He did not use a respirator.

37. HLA-DPB1 And Chronic Beryllium Disease
HLADPB1 and Chronic beryllium disease Print Version. This review willfocus on the role of HLA-DPB1 in chronic beryllium disease.
http://www.cdc.gov/genomics/hugenet/reviews/beryllium.htm
HuGE Review Home About HuGE What's New? Pub Lit Database ... CDC Genomics This paper was published with modifications in: American Journal of Epidemiology, 2003; 157:388-398 HLA-DPB1 and Chronic Beryllium Disease
Print Version
by Erin C. McCanlies Kathleen Kreiss Michael Andrew and Ainsley Weston Biostatistics and Epidemiology Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV.
Field Studies Branch, Division of Respiratory Disease Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV.
Toxicology and Molecular Biology Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV. Received for publication December 20, 2001; accepted for publication September 30, 2002. Abstract Gene Gene Variants Diseases ... Medical Literature Search Abstract
The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex is a series of genes located on chromosome 6 that are important in normal immune function. Susceptibility to chronic beryllium disease, a granulomatous

38. Beryllium Disease
Z . Back Home Next. beryllium disease. Beryllium Center. Beryllium SupportGroup support group for chronic beryllium disease. EcoIndiana
http://www.ability.org.uk/Beryllium_Disease.html
Our Aims Services Stats ... Z Beryllium Disease Beryllium is a toxic substance that can be harmful, depending on the amount and duration of exposure. Fact sheet from the National Jewish Medical and Research Center Beryllium Support Group support group for chronic beryllium disease EcoIndiana Beryllium Toxicological profile of beryllium, including information on environmental fate and transport, exposure pathways, metabolism, and health effects ... Webmaster . Site Design by Ability "see the ability, not the disability" Acknowledgments

39. Information About Beryllium And Beryllium Disease From Dessen,
DESSEN, MOSES SHEINOFF. INFORMATION ABOUT BERYLLIUM AND BERYLLIUMDISEASE. Last Updated February 01, 2002. WHAT IS beryllium disease?
http://www.dms-lawyer.com/AREA/beryl.htm

40. New Los Alamos Tests Will Aid Beryllium Workers
National Laboratory will make it easier to identify people sensitive to berylliummetal and help prevent workers from developing chronic beryllium disease.
http://www.lanl.gov/worldview/news/releases/archive/00-022.shtml
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New Los Alamos tests will aid beryllium workers
Contact: Jim Danneskiold Recent News Laboratory flips the mercury 'off' switch Thinning crews are working in Pajarito Acres area New high-purity plutonium sources produced at Los Alamos Cosmic particles find potential role in homeland security Lab upgrades to Security Condition 2 Northern New Mexico girls learn about math, science through Expanding Your Horizons program Lab returns to Security Condition Three Laboratory honors Year 2002 innovators Inventory weakness identified, remedied Los Alamos creates technology maturation fund LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Feb. 23, 2000 A two-pronged research effort at the Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory will make it easier to identify people sensitive to beryllium metal and help prevent workers from developing chronic beryllium disease. A team led by Babetta Marrone of Los Alamos' Bioscience Division has devised a new, more accurate blood test to identify workers who are sensitized to beryllium. The researchers also have pinpointed genetic markers that indicate increased risk for a small number of workers who are more likely to develop CBD. "This significant advance will help create an even stronger safety envelope for our workers who handle beryllium," said DOE Secretary Bill Richardson. "By identifying those workers who are more susceptible to being hurt by beryllium exposure, we can find them appropriate work that does not put them at increased risk. Pushing the science of worker safety is something we must do at the same time that we compensate workers harmed by exposure to beryllium from past practices."

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